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VICTORIA     AND     ALBERT     MUSEUM. 

DEPARTMENT    OF    CERAMICS. 


CATALOGUE  OF  THE  SCHREIBER 

COLLECTION   OF  ENGLISH    PORCELAIN 

EARTHENWARE    ENAMELS    ETC. 


VOLUME    I.— PORCELAIN. 
BY 

BERNARD   RACKHAM. 


PRICE   TWO   SHILLINGS   AND   SIXPENCE. 


Presented  to  the 

LIBRARY  of  the 

UNIVERSITY  OF  TORONTO 

by 

Mrs.  Stella  Langdon 


VICTORIA     AND     ALBERT     MUSEUM. 
CATALOGUE    OF 

THE    SCHREIBER    COLLECTION. 

VOLUME   I.— PORCELAIN. 

'    Publication   No.    io6  C. 


First  printed  January    19  15. 


VICTORIA     AND     ALBERT     MUSEUM. 
DEPARTMENT    OE    CERAMICS. 


CATALOGUE  OF  ENGLISH  PORCELAIN 
EARTHENWARE      ENAMELS      ETC. 

COLLECTED  BY  CHARLES  SCHREIBER,  Esq.,  M.P.,  AND 
THE  LADY  CHARLOTTE  ELIZABETH  SCHREIBER 
AND      PRESENTED      TO      THE       MUSEUM      IN       1884. 

VOLUME    I.— PORCELAIN. 

BY 

BERNARD    RACKHAM. 

•  <t  *  • 

C 


LONDON  :    PUBLISHED    UNDER   THE    AUTHORITY    OF 
HIS    MAJESTY'S   STATIONERY   OFFICE,    1915. 


Crown    Copyright   Reserved. 


\     (11)19259     \Vt  20633— 1-in     2000     2/15     K&S 


PREFATORY    NOTE. 

THE  Rreat  advance  made  in  the  study  of  English  pottery  and  kindred 
arts  since  the  publication  of  the  original  Catalogue  of  the  Schreiber 
Collection  in  1885  has  rendered  necessary  a  considerable  expansion 
as  well  as  revision  of  the  material.  The  catalogue  has  consequently  been 
divided  into  three  parts  dealing  respectively  with  the  porcelain  ;  the 
earthenware,  stoneware,  etc.  ;  and  the  glass  and  enamels.  The  present 
volume— the  first— comprises  the  objects  numbered  from  i  to  817  in  the 
original  catalogue,  with  five  additional  pieces  received  from  Lady  Charlotte 
Schreiber  in  1889;  the  second  will  comprise  Xos.  818  to  1372,  together 
with  17  additional  examples;  and  the  third  will  comprise  Nos.  1373 
to  181 3.  The  second  and  third  volumes  are  now  in  preparation  and 
will  be  published  as  soon  as  possible.  The  preface  to  the  original 
catalogue  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber,  giving  a  brief  account  of  the 
formation   of  the  collection,  is  reprinted  on  page  vii  below. 

This  catalogue  has  been  prepared  by  Mr.  Bernard  Rackham,  Assistant 
Keeper  of  the  Department  of  Ceramics.  The  thanks  of  the  Board  are 
due  to  many  friends  of  the  Museum  for  information  given  and  facilities 
afforded  to  him.  Among  these  are  Sir  Hercules  Read,  Mr.  R.  L.  Hobson, 
and  Mr.  A.  M.  Hind,  of  the  British  Museum;  Mr.  A.  J.  Toppin,  of  the 
National  Museum  of  Science  and  Art,  Dublin,  Mr.  Richard  Quick,  of  the 
Bristol  Museum  and  Art  Gallery,  Mr.  P.  Entwistle,  of  the  Free  Public 
Museums,  Liverpool,  and  Mr.  B".  Howard  Cunnington,  of  the  Wiltshire 
Archaeological  and  Natural  History  Society;  M.  G.  Papillon  and 
M.  G.  Lechevallier-Chevignard,  of  the  Manufacture  Nationale,  Sevres; 
and  Mr.  Roland  H.  Ley. 

CECIL  SMITH. 

Victoria  and  Albert  Museum, 
January  1915. 


NOTE. 

RECENT  researches  have  resulted  in  a  wider  and  more  exact  know- 
ledge of  the  history  of  the  various  English  porcelain  factories  and 
of  the  nature  of  their  productions  than  was  possible  in  1885, 
when  the  original  catalogue  was  published,  and  changes  of  attribution 
have  consequently  been  found  necessary  in  many  instances.  Every  item 
in  the  collection  is  cited  in  the  order  given  in  that  catalogue,  and  where 
a  change  of  attribution  has  been  made,  a  cross-reference  is  given  to  the 
section  under  which  the  full  description  appears,  the  original  numbering 
having  been  retained.  The  numbers  in  brackets  following  the  descrip- 
tion of  certain  of  the  marks  refer  to  the  reproductions  of  marks  on 
Plates  93-96. 

New  information  has  been  provided  concerning  the  sources  of  design 
from  which  modellers  and  enamellers  derived  inspiration  for  their  work, 
and  further  critical  material  has  been  added  in  the  form  of  references  to 
literature  in  which  questions  of  provenance  are  discussed.  Wherever 
possible,  the  sources  from  which  the  objects  were  obtained  by  the  donors 
are  stated  by  quotations  from  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber's  Journals,  edited 
by  Montague  J.  Guest  (London,  igii).  Illustrations  of  the  objects  in 
this  and  other  publications  are  also  cited. 

Finally,  the  opportunity  has  been  taken  of  amplifying  the  descriptions 
of  the  objects,  correcting  some  minor  inaccuracies,  and  increasing  the 
usefulness  of  the  work  by  the  provision  of  numerous  illustrations.  The 
works  to  which  reference  is  made  in  the  text  are  recorded  in  a 
bibliographical  list. 

BERNARD  RACKHAM. 


PREFACE  TO  THE  ORIGINAL  CATALOGUE. 

THE  Collection,  of  which  this  is  a  catalogue,  was  commenced  at 
the  end  of  1865,  at  a  time  when  examples  of  English  Porcelain 
and  Earthenware  were  less  studied  and  appreciated  than  is  now  the 
case.  The  aim  in  its  formation  was  to  bring  together  objects  typical 
of  English  Ceramic  Art,  and  not  merely  such  as  were  conspicuous  for 
their  beauty  or  variety.  Accordingly  specimens  of  our  principal  manu- 
factories will  be  found  included  in  it.  Of  late  years  increasing  attention 
has  been  paid  to  the  products,  no  less  than  to  the  history,  of  these 
factories.  Old  and  unknown  collections  have  been  brought  to  light, 
and  the  Art  of  the  Potter  has  been  the  subject  of  careful  and  critical 
inquiry ;  the  Marks  employed  have  been  classified,  and  the  dates  and 
names  of  those  under  whom  the  several  establishments  rose  to  fame, 
as  well  as  those  of  many  of  the  able  hands  whom  they  employed,  have 
been  duly  recorded  ;  nor  is  it  too  much  to  say  that  the  works  of  our 
ceramic  artists  are  now  acknowledged  to  stand  on  an  equality  with 
those  of  France,  Italy  and  Germany. 

Since  the  commencement  of  our  researches  several  interesting 
incidents  have  occurred  which  have  added  to  our  information  on  these 
subjects. 

In  1868  the  extensive  operations  carried  on  by  Messrs.  Bryant  and 
May  laid  open  the  foundations  of  the  celebrated  Porcelain  Works  at 
Ijow.  In  the  debris  were  found  fragments  of  the  manufacture  in  all 
its  stages,  together  with  some  of  the  moulds  actually  used,  thus 
enabling  many  pieces  to  be  assigned  to  that  factory  which  had  pre- 
viously been  undetermined.  We  assisted  at  some  of  these  excavations, 
and  several  of  the  specimens  we  ourselves  disinterred  were  given  to  us 
by  the  proprietors,  and  are  included  in  this  Collection. 

We  had  the  opportunity  in  1869  of  purchasmg  the  memorandum 
books  of  John  Bowcocke,  w  ho  was  employed  in  the  Bow  Works  in  the 
beginning  of  the  second  half  of  the  last  century.  In  them  we  found 
some  curious  details.  Large  extracts  from  these  books  are  given  in 
the  third  edition  of  Chaffer's  "  Marks   and  Monograms." 

We  were  fortunate  enough  in  1870  to  be  present  when  Mr.  Bailey, 
the   proprietor  of   the  Fulham  Works,  made   a   search,  at  our  instance. 


viii  PREFACE. 

among  the  old  ledgers  in  his  office,  and  discovered  the  valuable  note- 
books of  Dwight  himself,  containing  his  recipes  for  making  "  white 
transparent  porcelaine,"  "  marbled  porcellane,"  etc.,  bearing  dates  of  from 
1689  to  1698. 

Mr.  Bailey  presented  us  with  some  specimens  which  had  been  found 
in  the  oft-cited  "  Walled-up  Chamber  "  at  Fulham,  which  w^ere  supposed 
to  have  remained  there  undisturbed  since  the  time  of  Dwight. 

In  the  course  of  frequent  journeys,  both  in  the  United  Kingdom 
and  on  the  Continent,  including  Spain  and  Sweden,  we  had  many 
opportunities  of  finding  remarkable  specimens.  But  the  most  valuable 
addition  we  ever  made,  at  one  time,  to  the  Collection  was  in  the 
autumn  of  1868,  when  we  visited  Kingsbridge  and  acquired  all  the 
Bristol  and  Plymouth  Porcelain  which  had  descended  from  Cookworthy 
himself  to  his  relations,  Mr.  Prideaux,  Miss  Tregellis,  and  Miss  Fox, 
and  which  they  willingly  ceded  to  us  with  the  hope  that  they  w-ould 
not  be  dispersed. 

Whatever  interest  the  Collection  now  offered  to  the  public  may 
possess,  rests  upon  the  claim  to  represent  by  examples  the  growth  of 
English  Ceramic  Art.  The  work  of  its  formation  has  been  a  labour  of 
love,  and  its  object  seems  best  attained  by  placing  it  where  it  will  be 
of  the  greatest  use  by  being  preserved  in  its  entirety,  in  which  its 
main  value  consists.  And  I  can  most  heartily  endorse  the  sentiments 
expressed,  on  a  similar  occasion,  by  the  late  Mr.  Sheepshanks  (and 
quoted  to  me  by  Sir  Henry  Cole  the  last  time  I  had  the  pleasure  of 
seeing  him,  shortly  before  his  death)  when  he  said  that  he  "  felt  like 
an  anxious  parent,  grateful  to  see  his  children  happily  settled  in  his 
lifetime." 

In  order  the  better  to  point  out  the  sources  from  which  the  deco- 
ration of  some  of  the  specimens  was  derived,  a  few^  engravings  and 
photographs  have  been  added  to  the  Collection. 

To  conclude,  —  it  was  said  of  Horace  Walpole  that  he  "  could 
throw  spirit  into  a  Catalogue."  Nothing  of  that  kind  has  been  aimed 
at  in  the  present  case,  and  the  simplest  matter-of-fact  description  has 
been  adhered  to ;  but  it  has  been  thought  that  an  occasional  note, 
referring  to  incidents  or  customs  of  the  period,  as  illustrated  by  objects 
in  the  Collection,  might  not  be  without  interest,  and  such  have  been 
introduced  accordingly. 

Very  warm  acknowledgments  are  offered  to  our  kind  and  gifted 
friend,  Mr.  A.  W.  Franks,  for  the  untiring  patience  he  has  bestowed 
on   the  arrangement  of    the  Marks   and  the  general    supervision    of   the 


PREFACE.  ix 

catalogue ;  and  the  best  thanks  are  rendered,  amongst  others,  to  Mr. 
Soden  Smith  and  Mr.  A.  H.  Church,  the  accompHshed  author  of  the 
"  Handbook  of  EngHsh  Pottery,"  to  whose  kindness  we  owe  the  valuable 
introductory  remarks  at  the  head  of  each  Section,  which  no  one  could 
with  more  authority  supply.  We  are  also  indebted  to  Mr.  C.  H.  Read 
for  kindly  drawing  the  Marks  for  engraving.  The  index  is  due  to  the 
industry  of  my  grand-daughter  Alice  Du  Cane. 

C.  E.  S. 


Langham  House, 

1884. 


CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

List  of  Plates        ---------  xii 

BiBI.IOGRAPIIY                 --....._.  XV 

Introduction            ...--.-..  i 

I.     Bow  ----------  4 

§  I.     Statuettes  and  groups,  coloured   -             -             -             -              •  7 

§2.     Figures  of  animals  and  birds,  coloured  -  -  -  -13 

§  3.     Statuettes  and  figures,  white        -             ...            -  14 

§4.     Vases  and  ornamental  pieces,  coloured    -             -             -             -  16 

§5.     Pieces  for  domestic  use,  coloured             -            -            -             -  18 

§  6.     Pieces  for  domestic  use,  white     -----  27 

II.     Chelsea        ---------  29 

§  I.     Statuettes  and  busts,  white  -  -  -  -  -31 

§  2.     Pieces  for  domestic  use,  white     -  -  -  -  "33 

§  3.     Statuettes  and  groups,  coloured   -----  34 

§  4.     Figures  of  animals  and  birds,  coloured  -             -              -             -  40 

§  5.     Vases  and  ornamental  pieces,  coloured  -             -             -             -  43 

§  5.     Chelsea  toys           -------  47 

§  7.     Pieces  for  domestic  use,  coloured              -             -             -             -  54 

III.  Chelsea-Derby      -               -             -             -            -            -             -            -  65 

§  I.     Statuettes  and  busts,  coloured      -             -             -             -             -  66 

§  2.     Figures  in  unglazed  biscuit  porcelain      -             -             -             -  71 

§  3.     Vases  and  ornamental  pieces        -             -             -             -             -  71 

§  4.     Pieces  for  domestic  use     ------  73 

IV.  Derby           --..-..--  76 

§  I.     Vases           .-..----  77 

§  2.     Pieces  for  domestic  use     ------  77 

V.  Worcester  ---------  81 

§  I.     Vases  and  ornamental  pieces        -             -                           -             -  84 

§  2.     Pieces  for  domestic  use     -             -             -             -                         -  88 

VI.     LoNGTON  Hall         -             -             -            -             -            -            -            -  119 

§  I.     Statuettes  and  groups        -             -             -             -             -             -  120 

§2.     Vases  and  pieces  for  domestic  use            ....  121 


CONTENTS.  xi 

PAGE 

\'II.     Plymouth  -             -------             -  123 

§  I.     Statuettes  and  groups      -             -             -             -             -             -  124 

§  2.     Figures  of  animals  and  birds     -----  126 

§3.     Vases  and  decorative  pieces        -----  127 

§4.     Pieces  for  domestic  use  -             -             -             -                           -  129 

VIII.     Bristol       -             -             -             -             -             -             -             -             -  i33 

§  I.     Statuettes  and  groups      -             -             -             -             -             •  i35 

§  2.     Vases  and  decorative  pieces        -              -             -             -             ■  ^39 

§  3.     Pieces  for  domestic  use  ------  140 

IX.     C.\UGHLEY  ---------  149 

X.     Liverpool  ---------  151 

XI.     Staffordshire  Porcelain  of  the  iqth  Century            -             -             -  153 

§  I.     Longport  --------  153 

§2.     Stoke-upon-Trent  (Spode)  -  -  -  ■  -153 

§  3.     Stoke-upon-Trent  (Minton)           .             -             -             -             -  154 

§4.     Hanley      --------  i55 

§5.     Staffordshire  (manufacture  uncertain)     -             -             -             -  155 

XII.     SwiNTON  (Rockingham  Works)      -             -             -              -             -             -  156 

XIII.  Lowestoft              ..------  158 

XIV.  Nantgarw  -■.-------  161 

XV.     Swansea     ---------  163 

XVI.     Coalport  -,--------  164 

XVII.     English  Porcelain  of  uncertain  origin             .             -             -            -  164 

XVIII.     Chinese  Porcelain  decorated  in  England        -             -             -             -  165 

§  I.     Decorated  at  Bow           -             -             -             -             -             -  165 

§  2.     Decorated  at  Chelsea      ------  165 

§  3.     Decorated  at  Worcester  -             -             -  166 

XIX.     German  (Meissen)  Porcelain  decorated  in  England  -             -             -  167 

XX.     Chinese  Porcelain            -------  168 

XXI.     French  (S£vres)  Porcelain         ..----  i6g 

Index             ..--------  170 


LIST    OF    PLATES. 


1.  Bow:  Coloured  figures.  ,\ 

2.  Bow  :  Coloured  figures.  j 

3.  Bow:  Britannia  with  a  medallion  of  George  II.  j 

4.  Bow  :  General  Wolfe  and  the  Marquis  of  Granby.  I 

5.  Bow  :  Boys  playing  drum  and  fife.  j 

6.  Bow  :   Figures  and  pot-pourri  bowl.  1 

7.  Bow  :  Gardener  emblematical  of  Autumn.  ' 

8.  Bow :  Woodward  and  Kitty  Clive.  ■  i 
g.  Bow  :   White  figures,  etc. 

10.  Bow  :  King  Lear. 

11.  Bow:  White  figures;  King  of  Prussia  tea-pot. 

12.  Bow:  Vase  and  plates. 

13.  Bow  :  Coloured  pieces.  ' 

14.  Chelsea :  White  pieces.  ] 

15.  Chelsea :  Figure  of  a  nurse.  ] 

16.  Chelsea:  Hercules  and  Omphale,  after  Lemoyne.  i 

17.  Chelsea  :  Chinaman  and  boy.  ■ 

18.  Chelsea  :  Coloured  figures. 

19.  Chelsea  :  Coloured  figures. 

20.  Chelsea  :  Leda  and  the  Swan. 

21.  Chelsea:   Coloured  figures.  j 

22.  Chelsea :  Dances  after  Watteau  ;  group  after  Vanloo.  j 

23.  Chelsea  :  Figure  of  a  reaper. 

24.  Chelsea  :  The  Music  Lesson,  by  Roubiliac  after  Boucher.     (Frontispiece.; 

25.  Chelsea  :  The  Seasons,  by  Roubiliac.  i 

26.  Chelsea  :  Actor.  ; 

27.  Chelsea  :  Lord  Chatham. 

28.  Chelsea  :  Figures  of  Birds. 

29.  Chelsea :  Vase,  Japanese  style.  j 

30.  Chelsea :  Vase,  claret-coloured  ground. 

31.  Chelsea:  Vases  and  candlesticks. 

32.  Chelsea  :  Scent-bottles  and  bonbonnieres.  ' 

33.  Chelsea :  Scent-bottles,  bonbonnieres  and  patch-boxes. 

34.  Chelsea  :    Tureen  and  other  coloured  pieces.  1 


LIST   OF    PLATES.  xiii 

35.  Chelsea :  Pieces  for  domestic  use. 

36.  Chelsea  :   Dishes  and  cups. 

37.  Chelsea  :   Dish  with  claret-coloured  rim. 

38.  Chelsea :  Pieces  for  domestic  use. 

39.  Chelsea  :  Plate    with    view    of    Chelsea    church  ;     Plate    from    the    Mecklenburg- 

Strelitz  service. 

40.  Chelsea- Derby  :   Coloured  figures  and  groups. 

41.  Chelsea- Derby:   Coloured  figures  and  groups. 

42.  Chelsea- Derbv:    La  Bergere  des  Alpes  ;  Le  Nceiid  de  Cravate  (after  T^oucher). 

43.  Chelsea- Derby  :   Pensem-ils  au  Raisin?  (after  Boucher). 

44.  Chelsea-Derby :    Biscuit    group  -Minerva     crowning     Constancy     and     Hercules 

killing  the  Hydra. 

45.  Chelsea-Derby  :  Vases  and  domestic  pieces. 

46.  Chelsea- Derby  :  Bowl  with  arms  of  the  Coopers'  Company. 

47.  Chelsea- Derby :  Heart-shaped  dish. 

48.  Chelsea- Derby  and  Derby  :  \^ases  and  domestic  pieces. 

49.  Derby  :  Jug  and  plate. 

50.  Worcester  :  Vase,  blue  scale-pattern. 

51.  Worcester  :  Vase  with  applied  masks  and  flowers. 

52.  Worcester  :  Vases  and  jug. 

53.  Worcester  :  Vase  painted  in  blue. 

54.  Worcester :  Jug  with  hunting  scene. 

55.  Worcester :  Pieces  in  Oriental  style. 

56.  Worcester  :  Pieces  with  printed  decoration. 

57.  Worcester  :  Vase,  jug  ^nd  coffee-pot,  printed  m  black. 

58.  Worcester  :  Pieces  with  printed  decoration. 

59.  Worcester :  Pieces  with  printed  decoration. 

60.  Worcester :  Jugs  and  plates. 

61.  Worcester:   Pieces  for  domestic  use. 

62.  Worcester  :   Pieces  for  domestic  use. 

63.  Worcester :  Pieces  for  domestic  use. 

64.  Worcester  :   Vases  and  other  pieces  chiefly  with  decoration  on  a  coloured  ground. 

65.  Worcester :  Pieces  for  domestic  use. 

66.  Worcester:  Mug  dated  1770;  tea-pot  in  Sevres  style. 

67.  Worcester :  Tea-pots  in  Japanese  style. 

(Worcester  (Chamberlains) :  Plate  with  sporting  subject. 
(Longton  Hall  :  Tea-pot. 
69.  Longton  Hall  :  Figures  and  group. 


xiv  LIST   OF    PLATES. 

70.  Longton   Hall:   Figures,  vases  and  domestic   pieces. 

71.  Longton  Hall:  Vase  with  applied  figures  and  flowers. 

72.  Plymouth  :  Asia  and  America. 
(Plymouth  :   Candlesticks  with  figures. 

''I  Bristol  :  Shepherd  and  Shepherdess. 

74.  Plymouth  :   Figures  and  domestic  pieces. 

75.  Plymouth  :   Figures,  vases  and  tea-pots. 

76.  Plymouth  :   Garniture  of  vases. 

77.  Bristol :  Group — -Venus  and  Adonis,  and  figures. 

78.  Bristol :  Children  as  Seasons — Summer  and  Autumn. 

79.  Bristol :    Children  as  Seasons — Spring  and   Winter  ;    classical  figures  as  Seasons — 

Spring  and  Winter. 

80.  Bristol :  Classical  figures  as  Seasons — Summer  and  Autumn. 

81.  Bristol:  Figures,  biscuit  plaque  and  domestic  pieces. 

82.  Bristol :  Hexagonal  vase  painted  with  birds. 

83.  Bristol :  Soft-paste  mug  and  sauceboat. 

84.  Bristol  or  Plymouth  :  Tea-pot  with  blue  ground. 
(Bristol:  Plate  with  ribbon  border. 

(Swinton   (Rockingham  Works)  :  Plate,  Chinese  style. 
86.  Caughley  :  Jug  with  monogram  "  SB." 


(Caughley :  Jugs  and  mug. 
(Liverpool : 


(Liverpool :  Mugs  and  cup  and  saucer. 

88.  Stoke-upon-Trent :  Spode  vase  and  Minton  beaker. 

89.  Lowestoft :  Pieces  for  domestic  use. 
(Lowestoft :  Tea-poy  and  mug. 

(English  porcelain  of  uncertain  origin.     Jug  dated  1792. 

91.  Nantgarw  and  Swansea. 

92.  Chinese  and  German  porcelain  decorated  in  England. 

93.  Marks,  Nos.  1-28,  Bow,  Chelsea  and  Chelsea-Derby. 

94.  Marks,  Nos.  29-50,  Derby,  Longton  Hall  and  Worcester. 

95.  Marks,  Nos.  51-73,  Plymouth  and  Bristol. 

96.  Marks,  Nos.  74-S8,  Miscellaneous. 


BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

List    of  Works   to   which    reference   is    made   in   tlie    Catalogue   and  of 
other  Authorities  consulted. 


Note. — The  abbreviated  titles  by  which  some  of  these  books  are  cited  in  the  text  are  added 
ill  brackets  after  the  full  titles. 


Archaeological  Journal,  The,  vol.  xix.,  1S62,— A.  Wollaston  Franks,   Notes  on  the 

Manufacture  of  Porcelain  at  Chelsea. 
Artist's   Vade    Mecum,    The,    being    the    whole   art    of   drawing  taught    in    a   new 

work,    elegantly    engraved    on    one    hundred    folio    copper  plates.     3rd    edition. 

London.     Printed  for  R.  Sayer  and  J.  Bennett,   1776. 
Ballantyne,      a.      Randal,     Robert     Hancock     and     his     Works.       London,     1885. 

(Ballantyne.) 
Bemrose,  William,  Bow,  Chelsea  and  Derby  Porcelain.     London,   i8g8. 
Bemrose,  William,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain.     London,  1906. 
Berlin,     Ausstellung    Friedrich     der    Grosse     in    der     Kunst     veranstaltet    von    der 

Koniglichen  Akademie  der  Kiinste  zu  Berlin,   1912. 
Berling,  K.,  Das  Meissner  Porzellan  und  seine  Geschichte.     Leipzig,   igoo. 
BiNNS,    R.    W.,    A    Century    of    Potting    in    the    City    of    Worcester.       London     and 

Worcester,  1865.     (Binns,  Century  of  Potting.) 
BiNNS,  W.  MooRE,  The  First  Century  of  English  Porcelain.     London,  1906. 
Bourgeois,  Emile,  Le  Biscuit  de  Sevres  au  XVIIP  siecle.     Paris,  1909. 
Bourgeois,    £mile,    and    Georges   Lechevallier-Chevignaro,  Le  Biscuit   de  Sevres, 

Recueil  des  Modeles  de  la  Manufacture  de  Sevres  au  XVIII''  Siecle.     Paris,  n.d 
BuFFENOiR,  HippoLYTE,  Lcs  Portraits  de  J. -J.  Rousseau.     Paris,  1913. 
Burlington  Magazine,   The,  vol.    vi.,  1904-5 — John    Hodgkin,   Transfer   Printing  on 

Pottery;  vol.  xx.,  1912 — R.  L.  Hobson,  Bristol  Porcelain  in  the  Trapnell  Collec- 
tion ;  and  vol.  xxv.,  1914 — Bernard  Rackhani,  The  Chronology  of  Bow  Porcelain  ; 

Contributions  to  the  Study  of  English  Porcelain. 
Burton,  William,  A  History  and  Description  of  English    Porcelain.      London,    1902. 

(Burton,  English  Porcelain.) 
Burton,    William,    Porcelain :    Its    Nature,    .'\rt    and    Manufacture.     London,    1906. 

(Burton,  Porcelain.) 
Bushell,    S.    W.,    Chinese   Art    (Victoria    and    .Mbert   Museum    Handbooks),    vol.    ii. 

London,  1910. 


xvi  BIBLIOGRAPHY. 

BusiiELL,  S.  W.,    Oriental    Ceramic    Art,    Collection  of  W.    T.  Walters.     New    York, 

1899. 
Century    Magazink,    The,  New   Series,  vol.   xxxiii.,    1898 — P.    L.    Ford,    Portraits  of 

General  Wolfe. 
Chaffers,    W'illiam,    Marks   and    Monograms   on    European    and    Oriental     Pottery 

and    Porcelain,    edited    by    Frederick    Litchfield.      13th    edition.      London,     1912. 

(Chaffers,  Marks  and  Monograms.) 
Chaffers,  William,    The    Keramic  Gallery,  2nd  edition,    revised    by  H.   M.  Cundall. 

London,  1907.     (Chaffers.) 
Chancellor,  E.  B.,   The  Lives  of  the  British  Sculptors  and  those  who  have  worked 

in  England,  from  the  earliest  days  to  Sir  Francis   Chantrey.     London,  1911. 
Church,   Sir  Arthur  H.,  K.C.V.O.,  F.R.S.,  English  Porcelain   (Victoria  and  Albert 

Museum  Handbooks).     London,  1904.     (Church.) 
Coke,  John  Talbot,  Coke  of  Trusley  in  the  County  of  Derby.     London,   1880. 
Connoisseur,  The,  vol.  v.,   1903 — The  Recent  Discovery   of  Lowestoft    Moulds  ;    and 

vol.  xxvi.,  1910 — Bernard  Rackham,  Longton  Hall  or  Chelsea  ? 
Delange,  H.,  Monographie  de  I'CEuvre  de  Bernard  Palissy.     Paris,  1862. 
Dillon,  Edward,  Porcelain  and  how  to  collect  it.     London,  1910.    (Dillon,  1910.) 
Dillon,    Edward,    Porcelain    (The    Connoisseur's    Library).      London,    1904.      (Dillon, 

1904.) 
Doenges,  Willy,  Meissner    Porzellan,  seine  Geschichte   und   kiinstlerische  Entwickel- 

ung.     Berlin,  1907. 
Dublin — Museum    Bulletin,    National  Museum  of   Science    and  Art,    Dublin,    vol.    ii. 

Dublin,  1912.     (Bulletin.) 
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Entwistle,  p.,  Sept-Centenary  Anniversary,  Liverpool,  1907.    Catalogue  of  Liverpool 

Pottery  and  Porcelain.     Liverpool,   1907. 
Essex  Review,  The,  vol.  xx.,  1911, — H.  W.  Lewer,   Thomas   Frye  and  Bow  China; 

and  vol.  xxi.,  1912 — Frank  Stevens,  The  Bow  China  Factory  and  its  Story. 
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C.  H.  Fischer  in  Dresden  [with  preface  by  O.  von  Falke].     Cologne,  1906. 
Folnesics,  J.,  Die  Wiener-Porzellan  Sammlung  Karl  Mayer,  Vienna,  1914.    (Folnesics, 

Sammlung  Karl  Mayer.) 
Garnier,  £douard,  Histoire  de  la  Ceramique.     Tours,   1882. 
G.^iTTY,  Charles  T.,  The  Liverpool  Potteries.     Liverpool,   1882. 
Gerhardt,  —  Sammlung  Gustav  von   Gerhardt,  Budapest,  I.  Kunstgewerbe.     Berlin, 

1911. 
GiBB,    William,    and    Bernard    Rackham,     A    Book   of   Porcelain.       London,    1910. 

(Gibb  and  Rackham.) 
Haslem,  John,  The  Old  Derby  China  Factory.     London,  1876. 
Hirth,  Georg,    Deutsch   Tanagra.       Porzellanfiguren    des    achtzehnten    Jahrhunderts. 

Munich,  1898. 


P.IBLIOGRAPHY.  xvii 

HoBSDN,   R.  L.,   British    Museum.     A  Guidi'  to  the  Englisii  Pottery  and  Porcchiin   in 

the    Department    of    British    and    Mediaeval    Antiquities.      2nd  edition.      London, 

1910.     (Hobson,  Guide  to  English  Pottery.) 
IloBSON,  R.  L.,    Catalogue  of  the  Collection  of  English  Porcelain  in  the  Department 

of   British   and    Mediaeval  Antiquities  and  Ethnography  in  the    British    Museum. 

London,   1905.     (Hobson,  Catalogue.) 
HoBSox,  R.  L.,  Worcester  Porcelain.     London,   1910. 

Hodgson-,  Mrs.  Wii.loughby,  Old  English  China.     London,  1913.     (Mrs.  Hodgson.) 
[ai;n'nicki;,    Friedricii,    Grundriss    der    Keramik    in    Bezug    auf   das    Kunstgewerbe. 

Stuttgart,  1879. 
Jiiwnr,  Llewellynn',  The  Ceramic  Art  of  Great  Britain.     London,   1878.     (Jewitt.) 
KipsoN",    Joseph    R.    and    FiiAXK,    Historical    Notices    of    ihe     Leeds    Old    Potter}-. 

Leeds,   1892. 
Ladies'  Amusement,    The,    or   the    whole    Art  of   Japanning  made    easy,  2nd  edition. 

London,  printed  for  Robert  Sajer,  n.d.  ■■ 
Lechi-:vallier-Chevign.a.rd,  Georges,  La  Manufacture  de  Porcelaine  de  Sevres.     Paris, 

1908.     (Lechevallier-Chevignard,  Sevres.) 
Mantz,     Paul,     Franq-ois     Boucher,    Lemoyao     et     Natoire.       Paris,     1880.      (Mantz, 

Boucher.) 
Marryat,    Joseph,    A    History    of    Pottery    and    Porcelain,    Mediaeval    and    Modern  : 

^rd  edition.     London,   1868.     (Marryat.) 
MvYER,  Joseph,  History  of  the  Art  of  Pottery  in  Liverpool.     Liverpool,   1855. 
Meissen,  Festive  Publication  to  commemorate  the  200th  Jubilee  of  the  oldest  European 

China  Factory,  Meissen.     Dresden,   191 1.     (Meissen,  Festive  Publication.) 
Meissen,  Koniglich  Sachsische  Porzellan-Manufactur  zu  Meissen  [Ali)um]. 
Meteyard,  Eliza,  The  Life  of  Josiah  Wedgwood.     London,  1865. 
Mew,  Egan,  Old  Bow  China.     London,  1909.     (Mew.) 
Michel,  Andre,  Francois  Boucher.     Paris,   1906. 
Museum  Bulletin,   National    Museum  of  Science    and    .\rt,    Dublin,  vol.   ii.     Dublin, 

1912.     (Bulletin.) 
Nightingale,  J.  E.,  Contributions    towards    the    History  of   Early    English    I^orcelain 

from  Contemporary  Sources.     Salisbury,   1881.     (Nightingale,  Contributions.) 
NoLHAc,  Pierre   de,   Franfois  Boucher.     Paris,   1907. 

Owen,  Hugh,  Two  Centuries  of  Ceramic  .\rt  in  Bristol.     London,   1873.     (Owen.) 
Oxford,  A.  W.,    A    Catalogue    of    Bristol    and    Plymouth    Porcelain,    with   examples 

of    Bristol    Glass    and    Pottery,    forming    the    Collection    mai  c    by    Mr.    .\lfred 

Trapnell.     Bristol,   1905.     (Oxford,  Catalogue,  Trapnell  Collection.) 
Papillon,  G.,  Manufacture  Nationale  de  Sevres,  Guide    illustre  du    Musce  Ccianiiquc. 

Paris,  1909. 
Parpart,  —  Kunstsamnilungen  F.  von  Purpart.     P)Crlin,   1912. 

*  Tim  tliird  editJon  uf  iliis  work  is  ndvcrlised  in  llie  llnr<l  edition,  dated  iyj6,  o{  The  Artist's  \'(idc-mecum. 
X      1!I2.V.|  A 


xviii  r.i]'.Licx;ii.\i'iiY. 

Pei.vture  Decurative  au  X\'II1'^   Sieci.e,   La.     ^«  Serie,  Sujcts  de   Genre,  Pastorales. 

Paris,  public  par  Armand  Gueriiiet. 
PoRiALis,  Baro.m  Roger,  and  Hexri    Beraldi,  Les  Graveurs  du   Dixliiiitieme  Siecle. 

Paris,  1880. 
Priueaux,  John',   Relics  of  \\'illiani  Cookwortliy.     London,   1S53. 
Read,  Raphakl  ^^'.,  A    Reprint    of   tlie   Original    Catalogue    of    one    Year's    Curious 

I'roductifiTi    of    the    Chelsea    Porcelain     Manufactory.      Salisbury,    1880.      (Read, 

Chelsea  Porcelain.) 
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Statuettes.     Salisbury,   1872.     (Read,  Porcelain  Statuettes.) 
Reicks,    Trenham,    and    F.    W.    Rudler.     Catalogue    of    Specimens    in    the    Museum 

of  Practical  Geology  illustrative  of  the  Composition  and  Manufacture  of    British 

Pottery  and    Porcelain.     2nd  edition.     London,   1871.     (Catalogvie  of  the  Museum 

of  Practical  Geology.) 
Rhead,  G.  Woolliscroft,  British   Pottery  Marks.     London,   19 10. 
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1913- 
Scherer,  CiiRisTLXX.     Das  Fiirstenberger  Porzellan.     Berlin,   igog. 
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Solon,    M.    I^.,    A    Brief    Description    of    Old     English     Porcelain.      London,    1903. 

(Solon.) 
SoLON,  ^L  L.,  .-\.  History  and  Description  of  tlie  old  French  Faience.     London,   1903. 
Spelman,  W.  \\'.  R.,  Lowestoft  China.     London  and  Norwich,    1905. 
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1903. 


CATALOGUE 

OF    THE 

SCHREIBER    COLLECTION. 

VOLUME    I.— ENGLISH  PORCELAIN. 

INTRODUCTION. 


THE  porcelain  in  the  Sclireiber  Collection  belongs  for  the  most  part 
to  the  1 8th  century,  the  period  in  which  the  manufacture  was 
established  and  reached  its  highest  level  of  artistic  attainment 
in  England.  The  collection  contains  characteristic  specimens,  covering 
a  wide  range  of  style  and  technique,  from  all  the  earlier  English 
factories  of  importance.  The  porcelain  of  the  early  igth  century, 
relatively  of  minor  artistic  interest,  is  also  represented  by  a  few  selected 
examples. 

The  porcelain  bodies  produced  by  the  English  factories  show  great 
\arietv  of  composition,^ but  with  few  exceptions  belong  to  the  class  of 
"  soft  paste "  or  "artificial"  porcelain,  differing  from  their  prototype, 
the  "hard  paste"  or  "true"  porcelain  of  the  Far  East,  in  the  sub- 
stitution of  an  artificial  glassy  material  known  as  "  frit "  for  the 
fusible  natural  rock  which  is  an  essential  ingredient  of  the  latter. 
"Soft  paste"  is  fired  at  a  much  lower  temperature  than  "hard  paste"; 
the  former  can  be  more  or  less  easily  cut  with  steel  instruments,  whilst 
tliev  will  make  no  impression  upon  the  latter.  The  porcelains  made 
at  P)Ow,  Chelsea,  Derby,  Longlon  Hall,  Lowestoft,  and  Caughley  all 
belong  to  the  class  of  "soft  paste"  ;  that  of  Worcester  (in  the  iSth  century) 
is  of  similar  composition,  modified  by  the  addition  of  soapstone  (steatite) 
to  the  constituents.  "Hard  paste"  was  made  only  at  Plymouth  and 
Bristol,  and  perhaps  for  a  short  time  at  New  Hall  in  Staffordshire, 
after  the  transfer  to  that  place  of  the  Bristol  establishment. 

About  the  end  of  the  i8th  century,  as  a  result  of  experiments 
made  in  Staffordshire  by  the  second  Josiah  Spode,  with  which  perhaps 


2  INTRODUCTION. 

those  of  Martin  Barr  of  Worcester  were  on  parallel  lines,  a  new  porce- 
lain body  was  invented  in  which  the  essential  ingredients  of  hard 
porcelain,  china-stone  (petuntse)  and  china-clay  (kaolin)  were  combined 
with  bone-ash.  The  new  composition  was  soon  generally  adopted,  and 
remains  at  the  present  time  the  standard  English  porcelain  body. 

Painting  is  the  most  usual  method  of  decorating  English  porcelain. 
The  colours  are  always  applied  over  the  glaze,  with  the  important 
exception  of  cobalt-blue,  which  in  all  but  a  few  instances  is  used  as 
an  underglaze  pigment.  Printing  on  porcelain  is  an  English  invention 
adopted  most  extensively  at  Worcester,  though  most  of  the  early 
factories  appear  to  have  made  experiments  with  this  process.  The 
printed  designs  were  applied  at  first  over  the  glaze  in  various  colours  ; 
printing  in  underglaze  blue  was  introduced  at  a  slightly  later  date. 
At  Chelsea  and  Derby  statuettes  were  made  in  biscuit  porcelain,  that 
is,  without  the  addition  of  glaze  or  enamelling. 

Very  few  of  the  compositions  of  English  porcelain  painters  and 
figure-modellers  are  of  an  original  character  ;  their  designs  were  borrowed 
from  various  sources.  Much  of  their  work  is  in  direct  imitation  of 
Chinese  and  Japanese  porcelain,  or  that  of  Continental  factories,  parti- 
cularly Meissen  and  Sevres.  In  other  cases  designs  may  be  traced  to 
engravings,  either  after  the  contemporary  masters  of  painting,  especially 
of  the  French  school,  or  from  the  compositions  of  the  decorative  designers 
(ornemanistes)  of  the  period,  such  as  Jean  Pillement.  Designs  of  the  latter 
class  were  published  by  Robert  Sayer  and  others  in  contemporary  albums 
of  prints  under  such  titles  as  The  Artist's  Vade-mecum,  The  Draughtsman  s 
Assistant,  and  The  Ladies'  Amusement  or  Whole  Art  of  Japanning  made 
casy.^ 

The  earliest  manui'acturc  of  ]:)orcelain  in  England  is  of  relatively 
late  date  as  compared  with  that  in  Italy,  France  and  Germany.  In 
Italy  successful  attempts  were  made  to  imitate  Chinese  porcelain  towards 
the  end  of  the  i6th  century,  whereas  it  was  not  till  about  the  middle 
of  the  1 8th  century  that  the  manufacture  appeared  in  England. 
Several  factories  came  into  existence  about  that  time,  but  the  exact 
date  of  the  earliest  English  production  of  porcelain  is  unknown.  The 
earliest  date  recorded  on  extant  pieces,  1745,  occurs  on  two  milk-jugs 
made  at  Chelsea,  one  of  which  is  in  the  British  Museum  ;  it  is  not 
known  how  long  before  that  date  the  factory  was  opened.  The  Bow 
factory  may  be  said  to  have  been  founded    in  1744,  that   at  Worcester 

'  A  copy   of  the  last-named  work,  purchased    at    the    sale  of  the   Merton  Thorns 
Collection,  is  iu  the  Library  of  the  Museum. 


INTRODUCTION'.  •  3 

in  1751.  Another  was  in  existence  at  Bristol  in  1750,  whilst  those  at 
Derbv,  Longton  Hall,  and  Lowestoft  were  established  within  a  few- 
years'  of  the  same  date.  Various  other  early  ventures  in  porcelain- 
making,  presumably  of  short  duration,  are  also  on  record,  but  the 
nature  of  their  productions  is  unknown.  The  instability  characteristic 
of  the  fortunes  of  most  of  the  English  factories  of  the  1 8th  century  is 
due  to  the  circumstance  that  they  were  all  carried  on  by  private  enter- 
prise as  commercial  undertakings,  differing  in  this  respect  from  the 
majority  of  their  contemporaries  on  the  Continent,  which  were  con- 
ducted "as  adjuncts  to  royal  or  princely  households  subsidised  out  of  the 
revenues  of  their  patrons. 

Included  with  the  English  porcelain  in  the  Collection  are  a  few 
specimens  of  Chinese  and  Continental  origin,  which  throw  light  in 
various  ways  on  the  history  of  the  manufacture  in  this  country.  They 
comprise  (i)  pieces  made  abroad  and  decorated  in  England,  (2)  a  tea- 
pot, which  appears  to  have  been  the  property  of  an  English  painter, 
(3)  pieces  which  have  served  as  models  to  English  potters. 

BERNARD   RACKHAM. 


I._BOW. 


TIIl'^  earliest  evidence  of  the  existence  of  a  porcelain  factory  at  Bow, 
in  the  east  of  London/  is  a  patent  dated  December  6th,  1744, 
taken  out  by  Edward  Heylyn  and  Thomas  Frye,  the  latter  an 
artist  whose  name  is  well  known  "as  a  mezzotint  engraver.  A  second 
patent  was  taken  out  by  Frye  alone  in  1748.  He  became  manager  of 
the  works,  and  remained  in  that  position  till  1759,  three  years  before 
his  death.  Two  merchants,  Weatherby  and  John  Crowther,  became 
partners  in  the  ownership  of  the  factory  in  1750;  the  former  died  in 
1762,  the  latter  became  bankrupt  in  the  following  year.  In  1776  the 
factory  was  bought  by  William  Duesbury,  of  Derby,  to  which  place 
the  models  and  moulds  were  then  removed. 

The  patents  of  1744  and  1748  indicate  porcelain  bodies  differently 
constituted.  Of  the  earlier  body,  containing  a  kind  of  porcelain  clay  in 
combination  with  sand  and  potash,  no  specimens  can  now  be  identi- 
fied as  surviving.  In  the  later  composition  bone-ash  and  pipe-clay 
were  substituted  for  the  porcelain  clay,  while  a  lead  glaze  was  used. 

The  productions  of  Bow  have  been  recognised  mainly  by  means  of 
the  following  documents  :— (i)  The  memorandum  books  and  other  papers 
of  John  Bowcocke,  clerk  to  the  factory,  some  of  which  are  preserved  in 
the"  British  Museum  ;  -  (2)  certain  inkstands,  two  of  w^hich  are  in  the 
British  Museum  and  the  Victoria  and  Albert  Museum  (No.  2864— 1 901) 
respectively,  inscribed  with  the  words  "  Made  at  New  Canton  "  f^  (3)  a 
bowl  in  the  British  Museum  accompanied  b)-  a  note  stating  that  it  was 
made  at  Bow  and  painted  by  Thomas  Craft ;  (4)  two  plates  in  the  same 
museum  made  in  1770  for  Robert  Crowther,  presumed  to  be  a  relative 
of  the  partner  in  the  firm;  (5)  a  number  of  fragments  and  "wasters" 
disinterred  in  1868  on  the  site  of  the  w^orks,  several  of  wdiich  form  part 
of  the  Schreiber  Collection  (No.  132). 

With  the  help  of  these  documents  the  specimens  detailed  below 
mav  be  divided  roughly  into  three  groups.  The  earliest  group,  dating 
from   about    1750,   exhibits   a   soft   cream-coloured   paste   with   a  thick 


1  The  actual  site  of  the  factory  was  on  the  Essex  side  of  the  River  Lea,  in  the 
parish  of  West  Ham.  ,    , 

-  Amongst  these  is  a  sheet  of  engravings  (pi.  145,)  cut  out  of  The  Ladies  Amusement 
(compare  p.  2),  and  coloured  by  hand. 

'  From  Bowcocke's  memoranda  we  learn  that  the  factory  was  known  by  this  name. 


BOW.  5 

unctuous  glaze.  It  includes  statuettes  in  plain  white  porcelain  generally 
supported  on  a  rectangular  base,  for  the  most  part  vigorously  modelled, 
but  full  of  technical  imperfections.^  Where  colour  has  been  added  to 
the  figures  the  effect  is  rather  crude  ;2  the  cheeks  are  tinted  with  blotches 
of  dry  red,  and  a  yellowish  grass-green  is  to  be  noted  amongst  the  other 
pigments.  Small"  pieces  of  useful  ware  with  pseudo-Oriental  designs  in 
the  manner  of  the  "New  Canton"  inkstands,  which  are  dated  1750  and 
1 75 1,  may  be  included  in  the  same  group.^  In  this  early  period  the 
signs  for  Mercury*  and  Mars  are  sometimes  found  incised  in  the  paste  as 
a  mark. 

The  second  group  comprises  the  finest  productions  of  the  factory. 
Their  date  is  shown  by  the  Wolfe  and  Granby  statuettes  (Nos.  5  and  6) 
and  the  Craft  bowl  to"  be  about  1760.  The  paste  is  similar  to  that  of 
the  earlier  group,  but  less  uneven  :  the  glaze  is  generally  of  an  ivory- 
like smoothness,  giving  a  rich  effect  to  the  gilding  and  enamel  colours, 
which  are  now  used  in  profusion ;  amongst  the  pigments  an  opaque 
greyish  blue  and  a  marone  purple  are  conspicuous.  The  figures  are 
mo"delled  with  great  delicacy.  The  smaller  ones  generally  have  a  round 
base  v/ith  a  funnel-like  hole  underneath  it.  For  the  larger  ones  the 
characteristic  Bow  pedestal  begins  to  appear,  supported  on  four  scroll- 
work feet  picked  out  with  touches  of  purple  or  other  colours.  Some  of 
the  figures,  stamped  with  a  B,^  are  ascribed  to  the  sculptor,  John  Bacon, 
R.A.  Others  are  stamped  with  the  mark  "  T","  '^  which  is  found  at  a 
later  period  on  Worcester  and  Bristol  porcelain  [see  pp.  83,  134)  ;  it  is 
usually  regarded  as  the  mark  of  a  modeller  named  Tebo,  employed  by 
[osiah  Wedgwood  in  1775,^  probably  a  Frenchman  who  altered  his 
name  Thibaud  to  its  phonetic  form  in  Fnglish  spelling.  Many  of  the 
figures  of  this  date  are  either  exact  copies  or  adaptations  of  others 
modelled  in  the  Royal  Saxon  Manufactory  at  Meissen  by  Johann  Joachim 
Kaendler  and  othe'r  artists.*  A  small  class  of  figures  marked  by  pale 
colouring  and  faint  indication  of  the  features^  is  rather  doubtfully 
ascribed  to  Bow  and  appears  to  have  been  made  slightly  later  than  1760; 
the  hole  in  the  base  of  No.  197,  and  the  resemblance  of  the  flower- 
painting  on  the  costumes  to  that  on  Nos.  18  and  24  are  in  favour  of  the 
attribution. 


'  Nos.  135-137,  143-151.  -  Nos.  2,  2a,  4,  ig,  19a,  181. 

2  N()S.  37,  155,  15.5a,  appear  to  belong  to  this  period.  '  No.  2.  "  No.  20. 

"  Nos.  5,  6,  7,  ID,  II,  41,  51. 

Compare  LcllevA  of  Wedgwood,  ii.,  pp.  119, 121,  130;  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,p.  108. 

8  Nos,  I,  la,  17,  21,  25,  26,  2Q,  181,  198a.  "  No?.  14,  30,  197. 


6  BOW. 

In  the  decoration  of  "useful"  wares  the  "partridge  pattern"'  and 
others  adaj^ted  from  the  designs  on  Japanese  ])orce]ain  of  the  school  of 
the  potter  Kakiyemon  were  much  in  favour  at  this  period,  as  exemplified 
by  the  Craft  bowl  ^  ;  other  Oriental  patterns  are  traceable  rather  to 
Chinese  porcelain  of  the  early  famille  rose.-  The  numerous  pieces 
decorated  with  applied  sprays  of  ^nnuis- blossom,  either  alone  ^  or  in 
combination  with  enamel  painting,'*  may  also  be  referred  to  this  period; 
examples  of  this  type,  which  is  copied  from  the  Chinese  white  porce- 
lain of  Tehua,  in  the  province  of  Fuchien,  known  among  connoisseurs 
as  "blanc  de  Chine,"  are  to  be  seen  among  the  fragments  found  on  the 
site  of  the  works. ^ 

Transfer  printing  was  also  employed,  as  at  Worcester,  over  the  glaze, 
in  black,"^  dull  purple,^  or  red  ^ ;  the  impressions  are  often"  indistinct. 
The  prints  are  occasionally  somewhat  clumsily  painted  over  in  colours.'-* 
The  occurrence  on  No.  131  of  a  print  by  Robert  Hancock,  who  is 
generally  assumed  ^°  to  have  been  employed  till  about  1756  in  the 
enamel  works  at  Battersea,  seems  to  show  that  some,  at  all  events,  of  the 
printing  on  Bow  porcelain,  may  have  been  executed  at  that  place. 

In  the  later  productions  of  I3ow,  such  as  the  Crowther  plates,  dated 
1770,  in  the  British  Museum,  and  the  masonic  punch-bowl,  dated  1768, 
in  this  collection  (No.  86),  the  paste  is  nearly  opaque  and  the  glaze 
uneven,  strongly  tinged  with  blue,  and  frequently  disfigured  by  black 
specks.  In  the  figures  of  this  period  ^^  a  dark  transparent  blue  takes 
the  place  of  the  opaque  blue  of  the  finer  figures.  The  four-footed 
pedestal  gives  way  to  an  irregular  rococo-scrolled  stand  imitated  from 
the  contemporary  statuettes  of  Chelsea ;  the  elaborate  diaper-patterns 
on  the  drapery  may  be  traced  to  the  same  source.  In  the  printed  wares  ^^ 
black  predominates,  while  the  impressions  are  clearer  and  darker  than 
before.  Where  painting  in  underglaze  blue  is  used,  the  pigment  is  of 
duller  tone  than  the  strong  vivid  blue  of  earlier  times. ^^  The  marks  of  an 
anchor  with  a  dagger  and  a  cross  in  red  or  brown  belong  to  this  later 
period. 

•  Compare  Nos.  68,  69,   log,   127.  -  \os.  78,  83,  105,   114. 

3  Nos.  156,  158,  162,  163,  164,  165/.  '  Nos.  30,  80.  »  No.  132. 

«  Nos.  73,  74,  93.  '  Nos.  59,  113,  131.  "  No.  71.  8  ivjos.  590,  ^gfc. 

1"  Apparently  on   the    evidence    of   an    enamel    watch-back,  bearing   a  print  with 

Hancock's  signature,  assumed  on  insufficient  grounds  to  be  of  Battersea  manufacture  ; 

see  Chaffers,  pp.  778,  977. 

11  Nos.  3,  8,  9,   12,   13,   15,   i6,   18,  23,  24,  25,  29. 

1-  Nos.  61,  65,  76,  77,  85,  106,  501. 

'^  Nos.  86  and  128  exemplify  the  later,  Nos.  90  and  92  the  earlier  blue. 


BOW.  7 

§  I.  STATUETTES    AND    GROUPS,   COLOURED. 

Nos.   1-30,  197,  &c. 

All  the  roUowing  pieces  are  painted  in  enamel  colours  over  the 
glaze,  and,  with  the  exception  of  Nos.  i,  la,  20,  200,  22,  30  and  188, 
are  further  decorated  with  gilding. 

1.  Pair   of   Figures.      A   boy   and   girl  selling  fish.      Copied   from    Meissen   figures 

modelled,  probably  by  Johann  Joachim  Kaendler,  about  1750.  About  1760. 
(Plate  i.) 

The  boy  wears  a  blue  coat  and  red  and  white  striped  trousers  and  stands  on  a  square  base, 
holding  up  on  end  a  big  oval  basket  in  which  are  three  fish.  The  girl  is  dressed  in  a 
yellow  bodice,  flowered  skirt  and  white  apron,  in  which  she  holds  up  two  fish ;  she 
stands  with  a  basket  of  fish  beside  her  on  a  square  rocky  base  on  which  are  shells  and 
coral.  H.  5I  in.,  j|  in.  respectively. 
Meissen  figures  from  these  models  were  formerly  in  the  Fitzhenry  Collection. 

2.  Pair  of  Figures.     An  actor  and  actress  in  Turkish  costume.     Mark  on  the  former, 

the  sign  of  the  planet  Mercury,  incised  (No.  i)*.     About   1755.     (Plate   i.) 

The  actor  is  clad  in  a  fur  cap,  long  mauve  cloak  lined  with  ermine  over  a  green  tunic 
faced  with  brown  fur,  red  breeches  and  high  yellow  boots.  The  actress  wears  a  long 
red-sleeved  cloak  lined  with  ermine  over  a  flowered  dress  and  fringed  pink  and  yellow 
petticoats  :  her  hair  is  dressed  in  a  high  horn-like  coiffure,  with  a  veil  hanging  from  it. 
Both  figures  stand  on  a  square  base.     H.  jj  in.,  8}  in.  respectively. 

3.  .^CTOR,  in  a  costume  pirobably  intended  for  Turkish.     Mark,  a  dagger  and  anchor  in 

red,  and  a  sword  in  blue  (No.  2).     About  1770.     (Plate  2.) 

He  stands  on  a  four-footed  rococo-scrolled  base  with  applied  flowers  and  leaves,  and  wears 
a  fur  cap,  long  yellow  fur-lined  cloak  over  a  blue  tunic,  lli)\vercd  breeches  and  high 
red  boots.     H.  g  in. 

4.  Statuette  and  Pedestal.     Britannia  supporting  a  medallion  with  a  relief  bust  of 

King  George  II.  (1727-1760).  The  pedestal  has  designs  printed  in  black  and 
painted  over  in  colours,  amongst  which  is  a  trophy  with  a  shield  bearing  the 
arms  of  Prussia,  indicating  that  the  statuette  was  probably  made  aboiit  the 
time  of  the  British  alliance  with  Frederick  the  Great  in   1756.     (Plate  3.) 

Britannia  sits  on  a  mound,  wearing  a  loose  robe  painted  with  bouquets  of  flowers ;  she 
holds  the  medallion  with  her  left  hand,  while  with  her  right  she  supports  a  shield 
behind  which  a  lion  is  crouching.  Beside  the  mound  are  a  globe,  weapons  and  a 
standard.  The  pedestal  is  elaborately  moulded  with  rococo  scrollwork,  leaving  three 
spaces  in  which  are  the  printed  designs  ;  these  include,  besides  the  above-mentioned  trophv, 
a  camp-scene  and  a  landscape  with  equestrian  figures.  H.,  including  pedestal,  6J  in. 
Church,  fig.  19. 

5.  General  Wolfe    (b.    1727,   d.    1759),   copied,   with   slight   modifications,  from   an 

engraving_  by  Richard  Houston  after  a  sketch  by  Captain  Harvey  Smith. 
Mark,  "  T° "  impressed  (No.  3),  said  to  be  a  mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo. 
About  1760.  This  statuette  and  its  companion  representing  the  Marquis  of  Granby 
(No.  6)  were  probably  made  to  commemorate  the  victories  over  the  French  in 
1759  at  Quebec  and  Minden,  in  which  the  respective  Generals  were  engaged.     On 

*Note.—The  bracketed  numbers  joUoiving  the  descriptions  of  marlts  refer  to  the reproductinns  of  them  on  PlatesgycjCi 


8  how. 

ihe  base  is  a  |)laii  of  a  fortress  jiartlv  rolled  uj),  showing  piwi  ui  the  name 
"BECK"  (Quebec).     (Plate  4.) 

The  general  stands  as  if  directing  operations,  beside  a  tree-stump  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base. 
He  has  a  musket  slung  across  his  shoulder  and  a  crepe  band  on  his  left  arm.  At  his  feet 
are  a  cannon,  cannon-balls  and  grenades,  an  axe,  a  standard,  and  sprays  of  laurel. 
H.  I3s  in. 
The  authorship  of  the  original  portrait  is  discussed  in  The  Cenlurv  Magazine,  New  Series, 
.\x.\iii.,  p.  327. 

6.  Gf.nkral    John   Manners,    Marquis    of   Granby  (b.    1721,    d.   1770),  in    the    uniform 

of  Colonel  of  the  Horse  Guards,  copied,  with  slight  modifications,  from  an 
engraving  by  Richard  Houston,  published  in  1760,  after  a  painting  by  Sir 
Joshua  Reynolds,  now  in  the  collection  of  the  Earl  of  Wemyss.  Mark,'"T" 
impressed,  said  to  be  a  mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo.  About  1760.  Probably 
made  to  commemorate  the  battle  of  Minden,  1759  ;  see  note  on  the  companion 
statuette  of  General  Wolfe  (No.  5).     (Plate  4) 

The  marquess  stands  bare-headed,  beside  a  tree-stump  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base.  His  left 
hand  rests  on  the  hilt  of  a  sword,  the  blade  of  which  is  missing ;  a  baton  is  also  missing 
from  his  right  hand.  At  his  feet  are  a  cannon  and  grenades,  an  axe,  a  standard,  spravs 
of  laurel  and  a  cocked  hat.     H.  14I  in. 

Compare  the  portrait  printed  on  a  Worcester  mug  in  the  Collection  (N'o.  553). 

7.  Minerva.     Another  specimen  in  the  Museum  from  the  same  model  (No.  482-1902) 

bears  an  impressed  "  T,"  said  to  be  a  mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo.  About  1760. 
(Plate  i.) 

The  goddess  wears  a  plumed  helmet,  an  imbricated  tunic  over  a  blue  robe,  and  a  yellow- 
cloak  with  crimson  flowered  lining  thrown  loosely  round  her.  She  stands  with  her  left 
hand  resting  on  a  shield  with  the  Gorgon's  head,  on  a  four-footed  rococo-scrolled  base 
with  applied  flowers;  at  her  feet  is  an  owl.     H.   13I  in. 

Bought  by  Mr.  Schreiber    at    Madrid,  March    17th,  1872,  see  Journals,  i,  p.   139,    " to 

Raphael's.  .'\t  the  latter  place  C.  S.  saw  a  Bow  figure  of  .Minerva,  which  he  ultimately 
bought  for  £s-" 

8.  Figure   of  a  Red   Indian  Woman,  emblematic   of  America,  one   of  a   set   of  the 

Four  Continents.     About  1770.     (Pl.a.te  2.) 

She  stands  with  flowered  drapery  thrown  round  her  and  a  head-dress  of  feathers,  taking  an 
arrow  with  her  right  hand  from  a  quiver  on  her  back ;  in  her  left  hand  she  holds  a 
bow.  The  figure  is  supported  by  the  stump  of  a  flowering  tree,  at  the  base  of  which 
is  a  prairie-dog,  on  a  round  rococo-scrolled  base.     H.   135  in. 

A  similar  model  was  used  at  Plymouth ;  compare  \o.  6S4  in  the  Collection,  and  note 
thereon  as  to  the  origin  of  the  type. 

9.  Vi;nus.     .\bout   1770.     (Pla'ie  2.) 

The  goddess  stands  leaning  against  the  stump  of  a  flowering  tree  with  two  doves  at  her 
feet  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  ;  she  is  clad  in  flowered  drapery  clasped  by  a  girdle,  with 
a  pink  veil  hanging  from  her  right  shoulder.     H.   loj  in. 

.Mew,  pi.  viii. 

10.  Young    Man    playing    Bagpipes.       Mark,    "  T° "    impressed    (No.    4),   said    to    be 

a  mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo.     About  1760. 

He  stands  beside  a  tree-stump  with  a  dog  lying  at  his  feet  on  a  round  base  with  applied 
flowers  and  leaves  ;  he  wears  a  black  hat,  pink  coat  with  green  collar,  white  shirt  and 
flowered  breeches.     H.  5I  in. 


BOW.  9 

11.  Grolp    of    a  Youxg    Man   and  Woman.      Mark,    "TO"    impressed,  said    to   be  a 

mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo.     About  1760. 

The  figures  are  standing  by  a  tree-stump  on  a  four-footed  rococo-scrolled  base  with  applied 
flowers  and  foliage.  The  man  is  dressed  in  yellow  cocked  hat,  pink  jacket,  blue  sash 
and  striped  breeches,  and  holds  a  bunch  of  flowers  in  his  left  hand  ;  the  girl  has  a  piiik 
hat,  yellow  dress  with  pannier,  greyish-blue  apron  and  striped  crimson  skirt ;  she  supports 
a  basket  of  flowers  with  her  right  arm  and  has  a  nosegay  in  her  left  hand.  H.  7^  111., 
\V.  of  base,  4I  in. 

12.  Pair   of    Figurus   emdlf-matic    of    Spring    and    Winter,  two   of    a    set    of    tlie 

Four  Seasons.     About  1765.     (Plate   i.) 

Spring  is  represented  by  a  girl  with  flowers,  .-Vutumn  by  an  old  man  warming  his  hands  at  a 
brazier.  The  girl  wears  a  wide  blue  hat,  green-  bodice  with  pink  sleeves,  striped  skirt 
and  flowered  apron,  and  sits  on  a  rock  with  a  basket  of  flowers  beside  her,  holding  up 
a  nosegay  in  her  right  hand.  In  front  of  her  is  a  flowering  bush  and  to  one  side  a  beehive. 
The  old 'man  is  seated  on  a  rocky  mound,  with  the  brazier  among  flowering  plants  at 
his  feet.  He  is  dressed  in  a  long  green  hooded  coat  and  flowered  breeches.  Both  figures 
are  supported  on  rococo-scrolled  pedestals.     H.  6  in.,  6|  in.  respectively. 

These  figures  resemble  in  style  the  figures  of  which  sketches  are  preserved  among  the 
papers  of  John  Bowcocke  in  the  library  of  the  Department  of  British  and  Mediaeval 
.Antiquities  at  the  British  Museum  ;  compare  Hobson,  Catalogue  0/  English  Porcelain, 
p.  II. 

Bought  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  in    Paris,  February    19th,  1875,   see  Journals,  1.,  p.  356, 

•■  There  are'two  verv  good  figures  of  Seasons  at  Crispin's To  the  Boulevard 

lieaumarchais  to  see  Crispin  again.  We  now  offered  him  ^8  for  his  two  Bow  figures,  which 
he  accepted." 

Mew,  pi.  XV. 

13.  Girl  dancing.     Mark,  an  anchor  and  dagger,  in  red.     About  1770. 

A  girl  in  a  pink  and  green  hat,  pink  bodice,  flowered  skirt  and  apron,  dancing  in  front  of 
a  large  bocage  of  flowers  and  foliage  ;  rococo-scrolled  pedestal.     H.  9J  in.,  W.  6'  in. 

14.  Pair  of  Figures.     A  boy  and  girl  with  baskets  of  grapes.     About  1765. 

Both  are  seated  with  the  basket  on  their  laps  on  a  stump  rising  from  a  rococo-scrolled  base, 
on  which  are  large  applied  flowers  and  leaves.  The  boy  is  clad  in  a  plumed  light  blue 
hat,  yellow-lined  pink  coat,  white  waistcoat,  and  flowered  breeches,  the  girl  in  a  crimson 
hat,  yellow  bodice,  and  flowered  skirt.     H.  5I  in.,  45  in.  respectively. 

15.  Pair    of    Figures  of  dancing   Peasants,  a  youth  and  a    young   woman.      .About 

1770.     (Plate  2.) 

The  youth  wears  a  yellow  hat,  crimson  jacket  with  yellow  sleeves,  and  flowered  breeches, 
the  woman  a  white  cap,  crimson  bodice  with  blue  and  green  bows  down  the  front  and 
short  sleeves,  flowered  skirt  and  apron.  Both  figures  stand  on  four-footed  rococo 
pedestals,  the  youth  being  supported  by  a  tree-stump,  with  large  applied  flowers  and 
leaves.     H.  7J  in.,  7^  in.  respectively. 

16.  Pair    of    Candlesticks,   each    in   the   form    of   a    kneeling    figure    of   a   negress. 

About  1770. 

I5oth  figures  are  clothed  in  a  flowered  dress  with  blue  and  gold  girdle  and  yellow  sleeves, 
and  a  white  veil,  from  which  rises  a  fountain  of  plumes,  forming  tlie  grease-pan  of  the 
candlestick  ;  this  is  bored  in  the  middle  with  a  hole  for  insertion  of  the  socket.  The 
figures  are  supported  on  rococo-scrolled  bases  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.  Each, 
H.  6.1  in. 


lo  BOW. 

17.  Paiij    ov  Figures.      A  negro   and  negress,   copied   from  Meissen  figures   modelled 

by  Kaendler.     About  1760.     (Plate  2.) 

The  negress  wears  a  high-pointed  striped  bonnet  and  a  long  pink  gown  over  a  flowered  dress, 
and  carries  a  basket  of  fruit  on  her  left  arm.  The  man  is  dressed  in  a  pink  and  blue 
cap,  cream-coloured  tunic,  pink  trousers,  and  red  shoes,  and  holds  a  dish  of  fruit  in  his 
right  hand.  Both  figures  stand  on  rococo-scrolled  pedestals  with  applied  flowers  and 
foliage,  the  man  being  supported  by  a  tree-stump.     H.  6|  in.,  0^  in.  respectively. 

For  the  negress  compare  Berling,  Meissiier  Purzellaii,  lig.  8j. 

18.  Pair   of    Figures   of    Boys,    phiying    a    fife   and   drum   respectively.       Mark   on 

both,  "I"  in  blue  (No.  5).     About   1770.     (Plate  5.) 

Both  boys  are  dressed  in  a  black  hat,  crimson  military  frock-coat  with  dark  blue  facings, 
flowered  waistcoat  (in  the  case  of  the  fifer  opened  in  front  so  as  to  show  a  white  shirtj, 
and  striped  breeches.  The  fifer  wears  long  white  gaiters,  the  drummer  stockings  and 
shoes,  from  one  of  which  his  toes  are  seen  protruding.  Both  figures  stand  supported  by 
the  stump  of  a  flowering  tree,  on  a  rococo -scrolled  base.     H.  ii|  in.,  loj  in.  respectively. 

Bought  at  the  Hague,  September  18th,  1879;  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  206,  "We  ended  our 
researches  by  a  visit  to  Munchen,  where  we  were  tempted  into  investing  £2-;  in  the 
purchase  of  very  fine  and  unusual  figures— Bow— representing  boys  playing  a  flute  and 
a  drum." 

Church,  fig.  20,  21. 

19.  Pair     of     Figures    of    Boys,    each    with    a    vase    for    flowers     on     his    head. 

About  1755.     (Plate  2.) 

Both  figures  are  dressed  alike  in  a  long  flowered  robe  with  a  crimson  sash  thrown  loosely 
round  the  waist,  and  stand  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base.  They  carry  a  wreath  of  flowers 
in  the  left  hand,  while  the  right  is  raised  to  support  the  vase,  of  fluted  form  with 
expanding  wavy  rim,  which  rests  above  a  garland  of  flowers  on  the  head.     Both  H.  14I  in. 


20. 


Pair  of  Figures.  A  male  and  a  female  cook.  Mark  on  the  former,  "  B "  im- 
pressed (No.  6).  -About  1755.  Perhaps  modelled  by  John  Bacon,  afterwards 
R.A.  (b.  1740,  d.  1799),  who  was  apprenticed  as  modeller  to  a  china-maker 
named  Crispe,' of  Bow  Churchyard,  from  1755  to  1762.  Mention  is  made  of 
"  cooks  "  in  the  memorandum  book  of  John  Bowcocke  ;  sixteen  were  ordered 
of  him  by  a  dealer  named  Fogg  in  1756.      (Plates  6,  i.) 

The  man  wears  a  black  and  white  cap,  blue-lined  pink  coat,  white  shirt,  flowered  breeches 
and  white  apron,  and  carries  two  trussed  birds  on  a  dish.  The  woman  is  dressed  in  a 
white  cap  pink-lined  yellow  gown  over  a  bodice  and  flowered  skirt,  and  white  apron  ; 
she  carries  a  dish  with  a  leg  of  mutton  upon  it.  Both  figures  stand  supported  by  a 
tree-stump  on  a  round  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  6.J  in.,  7  in.  respectively. 

Mew,  pi.  viii. 

21  B.\j\7-Z0,  one  of  the  characters  in  the  Italian  Comedy  {Commedia  dell'  Arte),  copied 
with  'slight  modifications  from  a  Meissen  figure  modelled  about  1735  by 
Kaendler.     About  1760.     (Plate  2.) 

He  wears  a  wide  cream-coloured  hat,  yellow  coat  and  trousers,  and  pink  collar,  and  stands 
with  uplifted  arms  beside  a  flowering  tree-stump  on  a  round  base,  decorated  with  scrolls 
in  crimson  and  applied  flowers  and  leaves.     H.  5I  in. 

Compare  C.  H.  Fischer,  Sammlung  AU-Meissner  Porzellan,  p.  40,  fig.  288.  Atention  is  made 
of  a  "  Pero  "  {sic)  in  the  memorandum-book  of  John  Bowcocke. 


BOW.  II 

22.  Harlequin,  one  of  the  characters  in  the   Italian  Comedy    {Comvicdia   dell'   Arte). 

About   1760.  ,     .  J        ,  ,      .        J 

He  %vear<;  a  conical  hat,  black  mask,  coat  painted  with  playing  cards  and  hearts,  and  parti- 
coloured trousers.  His  right  hand  is  raised  to  his  hat  ;  under  his  left  arm  he  holds  his 
lath      He  is  seated  on  a  tree-stump  on  a  round  base.     H.  4^  in. 

Mention  is  made  of  "  Harlequin  "  (siV)  in  the  memorandum-book  of  John  Bowcocke. 

23.  G.\RDENER,  emblematic  of  Autumn.     About  1770.    (Plate  7.) 

He  wears  a  green-lined  crimson  coat,  figured  waistcoat,  flowered  breeches  and  dark  blue  apron. 
He  stands  beside  the  stump  of  a  cherrv-tree  with  fruit  and  foliage,  on  a  round  base  ori 
which  are  applied  flow^ers  and  leaves ;  he  has  a  black  cocked  hat  in  his  left  hand,  and 
with  his  right  he  holds  up  his  apron  laden  with  fruit.     H.  14  in.  ,       ,      .     _ 

This  figure  is  adapted  from  a  model  made  for  the  Chelsea  factory  by  Louis  Francis 
Roubiliac,  which  forms  one  of  a  group  in  the  Collection  (No.  193). 

24.  Bishop.     About  1770.     (Plate  2.) 

He  stands  clad  in  mitre  and  vestments  with  fur-lined  cope,  with  his  right  hand  raised  in 
benediction,  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  on  which  are  applied  flowers  and  foliage. 
H.  ii|  in. 

25.  Turk,  copied  from  a  Meissen  figure  modelled  about  1750  by  Kaendler.     About  1765. 

He  wears  a  blue  and  white  turban,  a  fur-lined  pink  cloak  over  a  long  flowered  yellow  robe 
and  pink  trousers ;  a  dagger  is  stuck  in  his  sash.  He  stands  on  a  round  base  with  applied 
flowers  and  foliage.     H.  7^  in.  „  ,   .      .       c 

Compare  Berling,  Meissner  Porzellan,  fig.  82  ;    Meissen,  Festive  Pubhcalion,  fag.  37,  p.  34. 

26.  G.^llant    kissing   his    Hand,  copied    from    one   of    a    pair    of    Meissen   figures 

modelled  by  I\aendler.     About  1760.     (Plate  6.) 

He  wears  a  wig  tied  with  large  black  bow,  a  pink  dressing-gow^n  with  pale  yellow  lining 
white  shirt  and  blue  breeches.  Like  the  Meissen  originals,  this  figure  is  quite  e.\ceptional 
in  having  no  base.     H.  6J  in.  l      e-  l--  c 

The  original  figure  is  traditionally  supposed  to  represent  Augustus  the  Strong,  King  ot 
Poland  and  Elector  of  Saxonv,  kissing  his  hand  to  a  lady  of  the  court.  Compare 
Berling,  Meissner  Porzellan,  fig.  73,  and  remarks  on  p.  v  (no.  321)  of  the  preface  by 
Dr.  O.  von  I'alke,  to  C.  H.  Fischer,  Katalog  der  Sammlung  Alt-Meissner  Porzellau, 
Cologne,  1906.  /-   1     • 

Bought  at  .^msterdana,  October  24th,  1873,  see  Journals,  1.,  p.  235,  " to  Van  (..alen  s, 

where  we  got  a  very  pretty  Bow  figure  (sold  to  us  as  Dresden)  at  £5.  It  is  evidently  a 
portion  of  a  larger   scheme,  being  a  gallant  looking  up  and  kissing  his  hand. 

Mew,  pi.  XV. 

[27.  Figure.    Plymouth  porcelain,  see  p.  125.] 

28.  Boy  seated  on  a  Mound.     About  1760. 

He  is  seated  with  left  arm  raised,  beside  a  tree-stump,  on  a  green  mound ;  he  wears  a  black 
hat,  yellow-lined  blue  coat,  and  waistcoat  and  breeches  painted  with  roses.     H.  4J  in. 
This  figure  is  exceptional  in  being  hollow  instead  of  having  a  solid  base. 

29.  Pair  of  Groups.     A  negro  and  a  Turk,  each  leading  a  horse,  copied  with  slight 

modifications  from  Meissen  groups  modelled  about  1750  by  Kaendler.  About 
1770.     (Plate  i.) 

The  negro  wears  a  blue  and  white  turban,  a  long  pink  coat  reaching  to  his  ankles,  with  a 
iash,  into  which  a  dagger  is  thrust,  round  the  waist,  and  yellow  boots.  1  he  1  urk  is 
similarly  attired,  his  coat  being  lined  with  yellow  and  tucked  up  in  front  into  his  sash. 
The  horses  are  both  in  a  rearing  attitude,  supported  by  a  stump  with  applied  flowers 
and  foliage.     Each  group  rests  on  a  round  base.     H.  yl  in.,  8i  in.  respectively. 

Mew,  pi.  xiv  ;  Journals,  i,  ill.  facing  p.  54.  Compare  also  Berling,  Meissner  Porzellan,  hg.  97  ; 
Meissen,  Festive  Publication,  pi.  xi.,  7,  p.  33 ;  Sammlung  Custav  von  Gerhardt,  Budapest,  I. 
Kunstgeiverle,  Berlin,  191 1,  pi.  4,  nos.  66,  67. 


12  BOW. 

30.   Boy  on  a  galloping  Horse  with  a  Dog.     About  1765.     (Plate  i.) 

The  buy  is  naked  and  sits  on  a  lion's  skin  thrown  over  the  horse's  back.  Tlie  group  is 
supported  on  an  oblong  base  with  n.unded  ends,  on  which  are  applied  flowers  and 
foliage.     H.  5!  in.,  L.  y^  in. 

197.*  Lovers  and  a  Clown,  adapted  from  a  Meissen  group  modelled  about  1750  by 
Kaendler.     About  1765.     (Plate  i.) 

A  lady  and  gentleman  in  dress  of  the  period  seated  beneath  a  fruit-tree  embracing  one 
another,  while  a  clown  in  parti-coloured  costume  approaches  from  one  side,  putting  his 
hand  on  the  gentleman's  shoulder.  The  lady  has  a  dog  on  lier  lap.  The  whole  grouj) 
is  supported  on  an  oval  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  7I  in.,  W.  7^  in. 

Compare  Berling,  Meissner  Porzellati,  fig.  149. 

181.  Group  allegorical  of  Charity.     About  1755.     (Plate  2.) 

A  woman  in  a  flowered  robe  and  yellow  veil  standing  with  a  child  supported  on  her  lift 
arm,  giving  a  coin  to  another  child  who  kneels  at  her  side.     H.  11 J  in. 

This  group  may  be  compared  with  one  of  Meissen  porcelain  by  Johann  Friedrich  Eberlcin, 
figured  in  the  Festive  Publicution,  pi.  15,  no.  10. 

188.  Woman  holding  a  large  Shell,  copied  from  a  Meissen  figure  of  the  period  of 
Kaendler.     About  1760.     (Plate  i.) 

She  is  seated  on  a  rock  with  small  shells  attached  to  it,  supporting  with  outstretched  arms 
a  large  scallop-shell  which  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours.  She  is  dressed 
in  a  pseudo-Turkish  costume  consisting  of  high  pointed  purple  hood,  a  long  figured 
vellow  dress  with  white  short-sleeved  cloak  over  it,  purple  drawers  and  red  shoes. 
H.  5f  in.,  M'.  4I  in. 

198.  Pair  of  Figures.  Harlequin  and  Columbine,  the  latter  copied  with  alteration 
of  the  right  arm  from  a  Meissen  figure  modelled  about  1735  by  Kaendler. 
About  1760.    (Plate  2.) 

The  dress  of  Harlequin  is  painted  in  triangular  patches  of  crimson,  blue,  green,  purple  and 
yellow  ;  he  wears  also  a  pink  hat  and  black  mask,  and  holds  a  lath  under  his  right  arm. 
He  stands  supported  by  a  tree-stump,  on  a  round  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage. 
Columbine  is  represented  in  a  parti-coloured  bodice,  flowered  skirt,  and  yellow  hat, 
dancing  beside  a  tree-stump  on  a  round  base  similar  to  that  of  the  companion  figure. 
H.  5^  in.,  6|  in.  respectively. 

Compare  Berling.  Meissner  Poyzellan,  pi.  xii,  5.  Mention  is  made  of  "harliquin"  (sic)  and 
"columbine"    in  the  memorandum -book  of  John   I!owcocke. 

304.  Handle  for  a  Cane,   in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  boy  drinking.      About   1770. 

He  wears  a  white  hat,  pink  coat  with  green  facings,  blue  apron  and  red  breeches,  and  sits  on  a 
barrel  with  a  foaming  tankard  in  his  hands.  At  his  feet  are  a  dog  asleep  and  a  sheet  of 
music.     The  lower  part  is  decorated  with  rings  of  gilding.     H.  3^  in.,  W.   ij  in. 

J.  T.  Smith,  in  Nollekens  and  his  Times,  vol.  ii.,  page  177,  reports  a  reference  to  "very 
curious  heads  of  canes  "  made  at  the  Bow  factory,  in  a  conversation  between  Nollekens 
and  the  dealer  Panton  Betew. 

305.  Handle  for  a  Cane,  from  the  same  mould  as  No.  304,  with  gilt  metal  mount. 

About  1770. 

The  boy  wears  a  black  hat,  crimson  coat  with  yellow  lining,  blue  waistcoat,  purple  apron  and 
breeches.  The  sheet  of  music  is  omitted,  while  the  lower  part  is  painted  with  striations  of 
purple.     H.  3I  in.,  \V.  i:|:  in.     Compare  note  on  No.  304. 

♦  j\'o(f. — Where,  as  in  this  and  other  cases,  a  change  of  attribution  has  been  neceasary,  the  number  assi/^ned  to 
the  object  in  the  original  catalogue  has  been  retained  ;  see  the  Note  on  p.  vi. 


BOW.  13 

^  2.     FIGURES   OF  ANIMALS   AND   BIRDS,   COLOURED. 
Nos.  31-34,  226,  &c. 

These  figures  are  all  painted  in  colours  without  gilding.  The  birds 
are  for  the  most  part  fanciful  both  in  form  and  in  plumage,  differing 
notably  in  this  respect  from  the  Chelsea  birds  (sec  pp.  30,  40),  which 
are  often  modelled  and  coloured  with  sc^ne  resemblance  to  natural 
species. 

31.  Pair  of  Figukes  of    Monkeys,  male    and    female,  the  later  with  a  \oung  one  on 

her  back.     About  1760. 

Both  are  seated  eating  a  fruit,  on  a  round  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  3I  in., 
3^   in.  respectively. 

32.  r'uG-DOG.     .A.bout  1770. 

The  dog  is   seated  scratching   its   car   on    a  rococo-scrolled   pedestal   decorated  with    applied 
flowers  and  leaves.     H.  3^  in  ,  \V.  of  base  3*  in. 

33.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Cats  with  Mice.     About  1765. 

Kach  cat  sits  holding  a  mouse  in   its  left  paw,  while   another   mouse  is   running  into  a  hole 

on  the  base,  which  is  decorated  with  crimson  rococo  scrolls.     H.  3  in.,  3j  in.  respectively. 

Bought  at  Amsterdam,  see  Jminiah,  i,  p.    '4.  ".   .  .  .  at   niock's  only   2  little  Bow  cats,  13/4." 

34.  Dolphin,  probably  intemled  for  a  paper-weight.     .About   1760. 

H.  4j   in. 

226.  Pair  of  Figures,  a  cock  and  a  hen  with  three  chickens,     .\bout   1760. 

Kach  supported  on  a  mound  uith  applied  flowers  and  foliage  and  scrolled  edge.      H.  45  in., 
4  in.  respectively. 

227.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Green  Parrots.     About  1765.     (Plate  i.) 

Each  perched  with  a  fruit  in  its  claws  on    the  stump   of  a   tree,  which    is    supported   on    a 
three-footed  base  decorated  with  purple  scrolls.     H.  7}  in.,  6|  in.  respectively. 

231.   Pair  of  Figures  of  Birds,     .\bout  1760. 

ICach  bird  is  perched  on  the  stump  of  a  flowering  tree.     H.  3j  in.,  2J    in.  respectively. 

233.   I'iRD.     .\bt)Ut  1760. 

The  bird  is  perched  on  a  flowering  branch,  pluming  itself  with  one  wing  raised.     Supported 
on  a  broad  scrolled  base  with  four  feet.     H.  23  m.,  W.  5j  in. 


14  BOW. 

^  3.     STATCETTES    AND    FIGURES,   WHITE. 
Nos.  135,  &c. 

The  following  pieces  are  left  entirely  without  coloured  decoration, 
with  the  exception  of  No.  142,  which  shows  traces  of  oil  gilding,  now 
mostly  worn  off.  The  attribution  to  Bow  rather  than  to  Chelsea  is  in 
some  instances  a  little  uncertain. 

135.  Figure,  one  of  a  pair.     Henry  Woodward  (b.  1717,  d.  1777)  in  the  character  of 

the  Fine  Gentleman  in  Garrick's  farce  Lethe,  modelled  from  an  engraving  by 
James  McArdell  after  the  painting  by  Francis  Hayman,  of  which  a  photograph 
accompanies  the  Collection  (No.   1885).     About  1750.     (Plate  8.) 

The  actor  is  represented  with  legs  astride  and  hands  thrust  into  his  pockets,  standing  beside 
a  pedestal  on  a  square  base,  incised  with  check  pattern.  He  wears  a  large  three-cornered 
hat,  a  frock-coat  over  a  long  figured  waistcoat,  the  skirts  of  which  are  tucked  up  over 
his  arms,  and  knee  breeches.     H.  lof  in. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.   13,  Porcelain,  fig.  xlix.     See  note  on  No.   135a- 

135a.  Imgukk,  one  of  a  pair.  ICitty  Clive  {ni'e  Rafter,  b.  171 1,  d.  17S5J  in  the  charac- 
ter of  the  Fine  Lady  in  Garrick's  farce  Lethe,  modelled  after  an  engraving  by 
Charles  Mosley,  dated  1750,  of  which  an  impression  accompanies  the  Collection 
(No.  1815).     About  1750.     (Plate  8.) 

The  actress  stands  with  head  thrown  back,  a  spaniel  under  her  right  arm,  and  a  letter  in 
her  left  hand,  on  a  shaped  base  on  which  is  an  applied  floral  spray.  She  is  dressed  in 
a  wide  lace  cap,  a  lace-trimmed  bodice  and  a  large  crinolined  skirt.     H.  gf  in. 

A  pair  of  figures  from  tlie  same  models  appears  to  have  been  made  at  Chelsea,  as  well  as  at 
Bow.  J.  T.  Smith  (A  Book  for  a  Rainy  Day,  London,  1845,  pp.  266-7),  describing  a  visit 
to  Garrick's  villa  at  Hampton  in  1829,  states  that  he  found  still  remaining  there  "  a  figure 
of  Kitty  Clive  as  the  Fine  Ladv  in  Lethe,  from  the  Chelsea  manufactory',  which  was  some- 
thing less  than  a  foot  in  height,  was  perfectly  white,  and  one  of  a  set  of  celebrated  characters, 
viz.,  John  Wilkes  ;  David  C^iarrick  in  Richard  the  Third  ;  Quin  in  Fahtaff  ;  Woodward  in  the 
Fine  Gentleman  ;  the  Duke  of  Cumberland,  &c.  Most  of  these  were  characteristically  coloured 
and  are  now  and  then  to  be  met  with."  In  the  Strawberry  Hill  Catalogue,  made  by 
Horace  Walpole,  is  included  "  Mrs.  Catherine  Clive,  the  e.xcellent  comedian,  in  the  character 
of  the  Fine  Lady  in  Lethe ;  in  water  colours  by  Worlidge." 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  11,  Porcelain,  fig.  xlix. 

136.  James  Quin  (b.  1693,  d.  1766)  in    the    character    of   Fahtaff,  modelled    from    an 

engraving  by  James  McArdell,  after  a  drawing  by  himself.    About  1 750.    (Pl.\te  9.) 

The  actor  stands  astride  beside  a  tree-stump,  with  b,isket-hilted  sword  in  his  right  hand, 
and  circular  shield  on  his  left  arm  ;  he  wears  a  plumed  hat,  a  coat  over  a  long  waistcoat, 
breeches  and  jack-boots.     Square  base.     H.  9}  in. 

Ouin  was  appearing  in  this  part  in  1746-7, 

137.  King  Lear.     About  1755.     (Plate  10.) 

He  stands  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  with  a  broken  sword  and  orb  at  his  feet,  and  wears 
a  long  cloak  thrown  loosely  over  a  tunic.     H.  9I  in. 


BOW.  15 

141.  Lady  with  a  Basket.     About  1760.     (Plate  ii.) 

A  lady  seated  holding  a  basket  of  fruit  on  her  knee,  her  right  hand  raised  towards  her  lips. 

H.  6J  in. 
Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.   12,    Porcelain,  pi.  xlix. :  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  illustration, 

P-  35- 

142.  Pi^uTO  ATTENDED  BY  Cerberus.      Showing    traces  of    oil  gilding.      About    1760. 

(Plate  ii.) 

The  god  has  loose  drapery  round  his  body  and  a  crown  on  his  head ;  he  is  represented  in 
a  striding  attitude,  with  right  leg  advanced  and  outstretched  arms.  Cerberus  crouches 
behind  him.  The  group  is  supported  on  a  base  with  a  grotesque  mask  at  the  back. 
H.  6|  in. 

Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  illustration,  p.  35. 

143.  Pair    of    Figures    of    SphIiNxes.      The    heads  are   apparently    portraits    of    the 

actress  Peg  Woffington  (d.  1760),  adapted  from  the  painting  by  Arthur  Pond, 
engraved  by  James  McArdell,  now  in  the  National  Portrait  Gallery,  London. 
About  1750.     (Plate  g.) 

Both  are  represented  couchant  on  a  scrolled  pedestal.     Each,  H.  4I  in.,  L.  4;  in. 

Chaffers,  Fig.  493. 

146.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Lio.n's.     .\bout  1750.     (Pl.ate  9.) 

Each  is  seated  on  an  oblong  base,  with  one  paw  raised  and   supported   on   a  stump.     Each, 

H.  4J   in. 
A  similar  figure  of  a  lion  forms  the  handle  to  the  cover  of  a  tureen  in  the  Xational  Museum 

of  Science  and  .Art,  Dublin,  similar  in  form  to  No.  307 — 1869  in  the  Museum,  but  painted 

with  Japanese  ornament  in  the  Kakiyemon  style. 

147.  I'air  of    Figures   of    Pug-dogs.      Mark   on  each,  the   sign  of   the  planet   Mer- 

cury, incised.     About  1750.     (Pl.\te  9.) 

Each  dog  reclines  on  an  oblong  cushion  with  large  tassels  at  the  corners.     H.  3I  in.,  3I  in., 

L.  5I  in.,  5J  in.  respectively. 
Chaffers,  fig.  494. 

148.  Pug-dog.     About  1750. 

Standing  figure  on  oblong  base  with  Mowers  in  relief.     H.  2I  in.,  L.  a?  in. 

149.  Pheasant,     .\bout  1750.     (Plate  g.) 

Standing  on  a  rocky  base  with  applied  (lowers  and  foliage.     H.  6|  in.,  L.  yl  in. 

151.  Ostrich,  made  in  imitation    of    Chinese  (Fuchien)  porcelain  {see  p.    6).      About 
1750.     (Plate  9.) 

Standing   figure   beside   the   stump  of   a    tree  on  which    are  applied  three  large  flowers  with 
foliage.     H.  6  in. 

701.  Spaniel  with  a  dead  Bird.     About  1755.     (Plate  9.) 

The  dog  stands  open-mouthed,  with  his  right  fore-paw  on  the  body  of  the  bird;  rough  oblong 
base,  with  foliage  in  relief.     H.  3^  in.,  base  I..  4J  in. 


i6  BOW. 

§4.     VASES   AND   ORNAMENTAL    PIECES,   COLOURED. 
-^''«-   35-57- 

These  pieces  are  all  painted  over  tlie  glaze  in  enamel  colours,  with 
the  exception  of  No.  49,  which  is  painted  in  blue.  Gilding  is  added 
in  the  case  of  Nos.  48  and  53. 

[35.   Pair  of  Vases,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  85.] 

[36.  Vase,  Longton   HaU  porcelain,  see  p.   122.] 

37.  ^■ASE  AND  Cover,  painted  in  the  Chinese  style.     .Vbout  1750.     (Plate  12.) 

Elongated  o\oid  body  tapering  downwards  to  the  base,  short  neck  contracting  upw-ards, 
domed  cover  on  the  top  of  which  a  figure  of  a  bird,  not  originally  part  of  the  cover,  has 
been  placed  to  form  the  handle.  The  body  is  painted  with  chrysanthemums,  tree-peonies 
and  bamboos  growing  on  rocks  and  with  geese  standing  or  flying  among  them.  On  the 
cover  are  also  two  geese  among  plants.  The  edge  of  the  cover  and  the  shoulder  are 
painted  with  a  border  of  diaper-pattern,  interrupted  by  panels  in  which  are  flowers  and 
foliage.     H.  iij  in.,  diam.  jj  in. 

[38-40.  \'ases,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  85.] 

41.  Bowl    and    Cover  for    pot-pourri.     Mark,    "To"  impressed,  said    to    be   a    mark 
of  the  modeller  Tebo.     About  1760.     (Plate  6.) 

Circular  with  high  foot.  The  lower  part  is  decorated  with  gadroons ;  round  the  rim  is  a 
row  of  bosses,  below  which  are  painted  sprays  of  flowers.  Inside  on  the  bottom  is  a 
rose-spray.  The  cover  has  a  border  of  pierced  acanthus-foliage  and  rises  in  the  middle 
to  a  dome  painted  with  floral  sprays,  which  is  surmounted  by  a  seated  figure  of  a  boy 
playing  bagpipes.  H.  lo  in.,  diam.  6|  in. 
.As  in  the  case  of  Nos.  43  and  711,  it  is  probable  that  the  mark  refers  only  to  the  modelhng 
of  the  figure  in  relief  on  the  cover  ;  compare  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  p.   108. 

[42.   Vxui  ov  Vases,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  43.] 
[43.  Vase  and  Cover,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  84.] 

44.  Vase.     About  1760. 

Ovoid  body,  shaped  spreading  base,  narrow  neck,  mouth  expanding  in  the  form  of  a  flower 
with  v'ariouslv  coloured  petals  ;  a  frill  of  similar  petals  encircles  the  lower  part  of  the 
body.  On  the  shoulder  are  three  masks  connected  by  garlands  of  foliage  from  which 
hang  wreaths  of  flowers,  all  applied  in  full  relief  and  coloured.  The  interspaces  are 
painted  with  lloral  sprays.     H.  8|  in.,  diam.  5J:  in. 

[45.   PAUi  oE  Vases,  Chinese  porcelain,  see  p.   168.] 
46.  Pedestal,     .-\bout  1760.     (Pl.\te   13.) 

I'our-lobed,  with  scrolls  painted  in  blue  and  purple  at  the  angles.  On  three  sides  are 
bouquets  of  flowers  in  colours:  the  fourth  is  moulded  in  relief  with  military  emblems. 
H.  3J-  in.,  W.  jV  in. 


BOW.  17 

[47.  Pair  oi-  \'ases  of  Flowers,  Longton  Hall  porcelain,  see  p.  122.] 

48.  Bowl  with  Cover  and  Stand.     Mark,  an  anchor  and  dagger  in  red.     About  1770. 

Tlie  bowl  is  circular,  with  two  loop  handles  in  the  form  of  twigs  with  flowers  and  foliage, 
and  is  painted  on  either  side  with  two  exotic  birds  on  branches  of  trees  above  a  serrated 
border,  on  which  are  gilt  floral  sprays  on  a  powdered  blue  ground  ;  inside  on  the  bottom 
is  a  rose.  The  cover  has  a  scrolled  handle  set  in  the  middle  of  a  blue  star,  in  each  of 
the  eight  points  of  which  is  a  gilt  floral  spray ;  the  star  is  surrounded  by  birds  and 
insects.  The  stand  has  a  wavy  edge,  and  is  decorated  with  a  similar  star  in  the  middle 
and  on  the  rim  with  exotic  birds  on  branches  and  insects.  Bowl  and  cover,  H.  ^\  in.. 
\V.  6  in  ;  stand,  diam.  jl  in. 

Mew,  pi.  ix. 

49.  Bowl  and  Cover,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.     .A-bout  1770. 

The  bowl  and  cover  are  moulded  with  basketwork  (on  the  latter  pierced),  and  decorated  with 
applied  sprays  of  flowers  and  foliage ;  the  cover  has  a  handle  twined  about  with  ribbon. 
Round  the  inside  of  the  bowl  and  the  edge  of  the  cover  is  a  border  of  diaper  ornament, 
and  on  the  bottom  of  the  bowl  is  a  Chinese  landscape  with  a  large  butterfly.  H.  7j  in., 
diam.  7J  in. 

.-\  bowl  of  the  same  form  in  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain  is  also  included  in  the  collection  (No.  439). 
A  ver)'  similar  bowl  figured  by  Bemrose  {Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.  xlvi)  is  ascribed 
by  him  to  Longton  Hall. 

Mew,  pi.  xi. 

50.  Slgar-basin  and  Cover,  with  applied  relief  decoration    in    imitation    of    Chinese 

(Fuchien)  porcelain  (see  p.  6).     About  1755. 

Both  pieces  are  decorated  with  three  /))-«««s-sprays  in  relief,  between  which  are  sprays  of 
flowers  in  colours.     H.  3I  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

51.  Bowl,  in  the  form  of  a  basket.     Mark,  "  T  "  impressed.     Perhaps  modelled  by  Tebo 

(see  No.  41).     About  1760.     (Plate  13.) 

The   basket  is  of  oval  form,  with  open  trelliswork  sides  and  applied  coloured  flowers  at    the 

points  of  intersection ;  it  is  supported  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base,  round  the  top  of  which 

are  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  4j  in.,  W.  4I  in. 
Mew,  pi.  xi. 

[52,  53.  Basket  and  Pair  of  Flower-holders,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  88.] 

54.  Flower-holdf.r,  with  applied  relief  decoration.     Mark,  4  in  red.     .About   1760. 

The  back  is  flat ;  the  bowed  front  is  moulded  with  rococo  scrolls  and  painted  with  u 
bouquet  in  colours  within  a  wreath  of  applied  flowers  tied  with  a  ribbon.  H.  gj  in., 
\V.  3J  in. 

55.  Dish.     About  1760. 

Oblong,  w-ith  eight  sides  and  an  angular  handle  at  either  end.  Painted  with  a  bouquet  and 
sprays  of  flowers  and  insects,  and  with  a  border  in  the  style  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon 
ware,  of  gilt  conventional  flowers  among  close  red  foliage.  The  underside  of  the  rim  is 
coloured  yellow.     I,.  13!  in.,  W.  9^  in. 

56.  Pair    of    Bottles,    each    mounted    with   ormoulu    foot   and    rim.      .About    1760. 

(Pl.'\.te  13.) 

Each  has  a  bulbous  body  and  long  narrow  neck,  and  is  painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays 
of  flowers.     H.  j^  in.,  5J  in.,  diam.  3J  in.,  3J  in.  respectively. 

57.  Pair  of  Bottles.     About  1760.     (Plate  13.) 

Each  has  a  bulbous  body  painted  with  two  birds,  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers;  long  neck 
also  decorated  with  sprays  of  flowers,  with  projecting  ring  near  the  top  and  expanding 
mouth.     Each,  H.  9J  in.,  diam.  5S  in. 

Siiuilar   in  style  to  No.  104. 


1 8  BOW. 

§  5.     PIECES  EUR  DOMESTIC  I'SE,  COLOURED. 

Nos.  58-132. 

'riic  decoration  ol  the  following  pieces  is  variously  elicctetl  by 
painting  or  printing  in  various  colours  over  tlie  glaze  or  by  painting 
in  blue  under  the  glaze,     (jilding  is  added  in  a  few  specified  cases. 

[58.  Dish,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  90.] 

59.  Dish,  printed  in  purplish-black  with  a  group  of  figures  copied  from  a  composition 

of  Watteau,   engraved   by  Charles  Nicholas   Cochin  pere,  entitled  "  Le  Bosquet 
de  Bacchus."     About   1755. 

Oval  with  wavy  rim.  The  group  comprises  five  figures  of  ladies  anil  gallants  beside  a  tree, 
three  reclining  and  two  standing.     L.  75  in.,  W.  6j  in. 

59a.  Dish,  decorated  with  prints  in  brown  painted  over  in  colours.     About   1755. 

Oval  with  lobed  rim,  and  wavy  edge  lined  with  brown.  In  the  middle  is  a  man  approaching 
a  table  at  which  a  woman  is  seated,  and  on  the  rim  are  two  smaller  groups,  one  of  a 
man,  woman,  and  child,  the  other  of  three  children  :  all  the  figures  are  in  pseudo-Chinese 
dress.     L.  y}  in.,   W.  6\  in. 

59b.   Dish,  decorated  with  prints  in  brown  painted  over  in  colours.     About   1755. 

Oval  with  lobed  rim,  and  wavy  edge  lined  with  brown.  In  the  middle  is  a  group  of  two 
Chinese  ladies  and  a  boy  in  a  garden.     L.  7I  in.,  W.  6}  in. 

60.  Dish,  moulded  in  relief,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770. 

Oval  with  wavy  rim,  moulded  with  vine-leaves  and  bunches  of  grapes.  The  middle  is  painted 
with  a  group  of  fruit.     L.  9^  in.,  W.  8|  in. 

61.  Dish,    moulded   in   the   form    of   a    leaf,  painted    in   pink,  yellow  and    green,  and 

jirinted  in  black.     .About   1765. 

The  edge  is  coloured  green  and  yellow,  the  mid-rib  and  veins  pink:  in   the  middle  are  three 

butterflies  printed  in  black.     L.  8|  in. 
This  dish   is  similar   in  style  to    No.  65,   which  is  signed  "  Rhodes  pinxit,"  and   was    perhaps 

made  at  Bow  and  decorated  elsewhere.     See  also  note  on  N'o.  501  below. 

357.  SwEF.rME.vT-Disii,  in  the  form  of  a  leaf,  painted  in  colours,     .-\bout  1750. 

The  stalk  forms  the  handle.     On  the  lower  side  is  a  spray  of  flowers  in  relief  on  which  the 

tray  rests.      The  inside  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowering  tree-peony  in  the  Chinese  style. 

H.  i^  in.,  W.  5  in. 
This    piece   is   very  similar    in    decoration    to    the    inkstand    in   the  Museum  (N'o.  2S64 — 1901) 

inscribed  "Made  at  New  Canton  1751." 

501.  Dish,  printed  in  purple  and  painted  in  colours.     About  1765. 

Moulded  in  the  form  of  two  lettuce-leaves,  printed  with  a  group  of  birds   fl}ing   or   perched 

on  tree-stumps  in  a  landscape.     1  he  edges  of  the  leaves   are  coloured  green  and  yellow, 

and  veins  are   indicated   in    crimson   on    part   of  one   of   them,  which   is    turned   back, 

I,.  104-  in.,  \V.  7I  in. 
Similar  to  No.  61  :   compare   note  thereon.       This   piece   and   N'o.   61   appear   to  be  inferior 

imitations  made  at  Bow  of  Worcester  shapes  e.vemplified  by  Nos.  500  and  532  respectively. 


BOW.  19 

62.   Pair  of  Dishes,  painted  in  colours.     Mark  on  both,  an  anchor  and  dagger  in  red. 
About  1770. 

Eight-sided  oblong,  with  sloping  sides,  which  are  painted  with  branches  of  foliage  in  red  and 
green ;  in  the  middle  is  a  lake-scene  in  the  same  colours  and  purple.  Each,  L.  85  in., 
W.  61  in. 

[63.  Dish,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  56.] 

64.  Dish,  painted   in   underglaze  blue,  with  a  powdered  blue  ground,   in   imitation  of 

Chinese  porcelain.     About  1765. 

Shell-shaped  ;  painted  on  the  upper  side  with  Cliinese  landscapes  and  floral  sprays  in  eight 
panels,  alternately  circular  and  fan-shaped,  surrounding  a  landscape  in  a  larger  panel,  all 
reserved  in  white  on  the  blue  ground.     Diam.  75  in. 

Compare  note  on  Xo.  J15  below. 

514.  I'wo  Plates,    with   a    powdered   blue    ground.      Mark,    five    simulated    Chinese 

characters,  in  blue  (No.  13).     About  1765. 

The  upper  surface  is  entirely  covered  with  blue  ;  the  lower  side  is  left  white  and  is  painted  on  the 
rim  with  branches  in  blue.     Diam.  8|  in.,  8^  in.  respectively. 

515.  Two    Plates,    painted    in    underglaze   blue,    with    a   powdered    blue    ground,    in 

imitation    of   Chinese   porcelain.     .Mark,    six  simulated  Chinese  characters  and 
crossed  swords,  in  blue  (No.  14).     About  1765.    (Plate  12.) 

Painted  on  the  upper  side  with  Chinese  landscapes  and  floral  sprays  in  eight  panels,  alternatelv 
fan-shaped  and  circular,  surrounding  a  landscape  in  a  larger  circular  panel,  all  reserved 
in  white  on  the  blue  ground.  The  lower  side  of  the  rim  is  painted  with  brandies.  Diam. 
gf  in.,g^  in.  respectively. 

Pieces  of  this  character  are  usually  ascribed  to  Lowestoft  or  Worcester;  compare  Spelman, 
Lowestoft  China,  pi.  Ixxv,  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pp.  58,  189.  The  distinctive  shape 
of  the  plates,  paralleled  in  Nos.  68,  69  and  80,  and  in  the  "  Thomas  Crowther  "  plates  in  the 
British  Museum,  as  well  as  the  appearance  of  their  paste  and  glaze,  is  in  favour  of  Bow  as 
their  place  of  origin.  The  question  is  fully  discussed  in  the  Burlington  Maf;azine,  vol.  xxv., 
[).  39.  where  these  plates  are  reproduced. 

65.  Pair    oe    Dishes,    with    moulded,    painted,    and    black-printed    decoration ;     the 

print  on    one    of    the    dishes    is    signed  "Rhodes  pinxit"  in  brown.      .Mark,  on 
one,  "  T,"  on  the  other  a  cross  (No.  10),  in  red.     .About   1765. 

Both  are  moulded  is  relief  in  the  form  of  two  vine-leaves,  with  edges  bordered  in  green,  aiid 
stalk  coloured  yellow  forming  the  handle.  In  the  middle  of  each  is  a  different  group  of 
birds  among  trees  printed  in  black.  W.  yi  in.,  8  in.  respectively. 
The  signature  is  probably  that  of  David  Rhodes,  an  enameller  who  worked  about  1760  in 
partnership  with  one  Hobinson  at  Leeds  as  a  decorator  of  English  and  foreign  china 
and  stoneware,  and  later  in  London  for  Josiah  Wedgwood.  He  entered  the  employment 
of  the  latter  in  1768,  having  "just  come  out  of  Yorkshire"  (as  stated  by  Wedgwood  in 
a  letter  to  his  partner  Bentley) ;  he  worked  for  Wedgwood  at  his  London  workrooms, 
first  in  Great  Newport  Street  and  afterwards  at  Chelsea,  till  the  time  of  his  death  in  1777. 
See  Meteyard,  Lije  oj  Josiah  Wedgwood,  ii.,  pp.  36,90,  118;  Kidson,  Leeds  Pottery,  p.  48 
(where  an  advertisement  of  Robinson  and  Rhodes  is  cited  from  the  Leeds  Inttlligencer  for 
October  28th,  1760).  This  dish  and  its  companion  were  presumably  decorated  at  Leeds; 
their  attribution  to  Bow  as  their  place  of  manufacture  must  be  regarded  as  uncertain. 
The  signature  although  phrased  "  pinxit  "  probably  refers  to  the  printing  as  well  as  to 
the  coloured  borders.  The  subject  on  this  dish,  a  group  of  tomtits,  figures  on  plate  73 
in  The  Ladies'  Amusement  (see  p.  2).  Nos.  61  and  501  are  dishes  of  similar  character 
The  mark  of  a  cross  in  red  occurs  also  on  a  mug  ascribed  to  Bow  in  the  Collection  (No.  106)  ; 
compare  note  thereon. 

B  2 


20  BOW. 

66.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  an  anchor  and  dagger  in  red  (No.  9). 

About  1770. 

Painted  with    exotic  birds   and  insects    in   colours,  in    shaped   panels   reserved  in  white  and 
•  outlined  with  gilt  rococo  scrolls  on  a  dark  blue  ground.     Wavy  edge.     Diam.  85  in. 

67.  Two    Pi.ATKS,  moulded  in  relief,  painted  in   colours  and  gilt.     Mark  on  both,  an 

anchor  and  dagger  in  red.     .\bout  1770.     (Plate  13.) 

Kacli  moulded  with  three  sprays  of  vine  with  grapes,  foliage  and  tendrils,  in  the  interspaces 
between  which  are  painted  sprays  of  fruit ;  the  rim  has  a  gilt  lobed  edge.  Kach, 
diani.  y-i   in. 

68.  Plate,    painted    in    colours    and  gilt,    in   the    style    of   the    bowl    in    the  British 

Museum  painted  by  Thomas  Craft.     About  1760.     (Plate  12.) 

(fctagonal.     The  rim  is  decorated  with  festoons  of  conventional  flowers ;   in    the   middle   are 

two  Chinese  phoenixes  and  insects.     Diam.  8j  in. 
Church,  fig.  18  ;  l)illon,  1904,  pi.  xlv.  ;  Dillon,  1910,  fig.  2j6  ;  Mew,  pi.  v. 

69.  Two  Plates,  painted    in    colours    and  gilt,    in  imitation    of  Japanese  Kakiyemon 

ware.     .About  1755. 

Octagonal.  In  the  middle  are  a  /)raiiiis-tree,  chrysanthemums  and  other  (lowering  plants  and 
two  quails.  The  rim  is  painted  with  floral  sprays,  and  with  a  border  of  close  red 
foliage,  with  gilt  flowers  at  the  angles.     W.  8|  in.,  8i  in.  respectively. 

These  are  undoubtedly  two  of  the  "  parteridge  octogon  plates"  mentioned  in  John  Bowcocke's 
memorandum -book,  some  of  which  were  ordered  by  "Lady  Stairs,"  May  15th,  1756. 

Xii.  69a.  Burton,  English  Porcelain,  pi.  iv. 

353.  Two  Plates,    painted  in  colours  and    gilt,   m    imitation  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon 
ware.     About  1755. 

In  the  middle  are  a  /)Kiin«s-tree,  chrysanthemums  and  other  flowering  plants  and  two  quails.     On 

the  rim  is  a  border  of  close  red  foliage  with  gilt  flowers  at  intervals.     Kach,  diam.  9  in. 
Compare  note  on  No.  6q. 

70.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,     .\bout  1770. 

In  the  middle  are    exotic   birds    .imong  bushes:  the    rim    is    painted  with    insects    and    lloral 

sprays  and  has  a  gilt  wavy  edge.     Diam.  8  in. 
Compare  Bristol  porcelain  plate,  \'o.  753. 

71.  Two    Plates,  each   painted    in    red  with    a    cuspcd    border,  and    printed    m    the 

same  colour  with   the  subject  of   Aeneas  carrying  Anchises    from    the    burning 
ruins  of  Troy.     About  1760.     (Plate  13.) 

The  subject  is  enclosed  within  a  border  of  rococo  scrollwork  and  ribbons.     Each,  diam.  7j  in. 
Given  to  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  by  Mr.  Hughes  of  Liverpool,  Nov.  jth,  i86g,  see  Journals,  i, 
p.  60,  "  We  saw  a  few  very  nice  bits  at  the  house  of  Mr.  Hughes  the  bookseller  ;  among 
these  were  two   Bow  plates  printed  in  red,  the   subject  being  .tineas   carrying    his   father 
out  of  Troy.     With  one  of  these  .Mr.  Hughes  .  .  .  presented  us." 
Chaffers,  fig.  489. 

[72.  Plate,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  91.] 

73.  Two  Plates,  printed  in  black.     About   1755. 

In  the  middle  of  each  are  two  sheep  beside  a  rock.  On  the  rim  are  three  Italian  landsc^ipes 
with  buildings  and  figures.     The  edge  is  coloured  brown.     Each,  diam.  jj  in. 


BOW.  21 

74.  Two  Pl.\tes,  printed  in  dull  purplish-black.     About  1755. 

Each  printed  with  four  groups  of  poultry  and  pheasants,  one  in  the  centre  and  three  on  the 
rim.     Diani.  7I  in.,  y}  in.  respectively. 

[75.   Pi-.VTE,  Worcester  porcelain,  sec  p.  gi.] 

76.  Two    Plates,  decorated  with  prints    in    brown  painted    over  in    colours.      About 

1770. 

In  the  middle  of  each  is  a  landscape  with  two  figures  and  buildings  within  a  rococo-scrolled 
border.  On  the  rim,  which  has  a  scalloped  edge,  are  insects,  small  sprays  and  detached 
flowers.     Each,  diam.  yf  in. 

77.  Plate,    faintly    printed    in  purple   and   painted  over  the  print  in  colours.     About 

1770. 

Octagonal,  the  rim  moulded  with  foliated  scrollwork  and  decorated  with  birds ;  in  the 
middle  are  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers  and  a  butterfly.     Diam.  gj  in. 

78.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1755. 

Octagonal,  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  and  a  narrow  green  border  with  diaper-pattern  in 
black.     W.  8  in.  ■ 

79.  Two  Pl.\tes,  painted  in  colours.     About   1765. 

Both  octagonal  with  brown  edge.  Painted  with  a  large  spray  of.  fruit  and  foliage,  and  n  ill: 
butterflies  and  other  insects  ;  on  one  is  also  a  caterpillar.     Each,  diam.  gf  in. 

80.  Two    Plates,  with  applied   relief  decoration,  in  imitation  of  Chinese  (Fuchien) 

porcelain,  and  painted  designs,  also  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1755. 

The  middle  of  each    is    painted  with    flowering   plants    and  "insects   in    colours ;  the   rim    is 

decorated  with  applied  sprays  of  ^>-«nHs-blossom,  between  w-hich  are  painted  floral  sprays. 

Round  the  inner  edge  of  the  rim  is  a  conventional  border  in  red.     Each,  diam.  y  in. 
Burlington  Magazine,  .xxv.,  illustration  facing  p.  39. 

[81.  Plate,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  56.] 

82.  Two  Plates,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,     .'\bout  1770. 

The  rim  of  each  has  a  wavy  edge  and  is  moulded  in  slight  relief  with  conventional  flowers 
and  foliage  painted  in  colours,  on  a  continuous  gilt  wavy  stem  ;  in  the  middle  is  a 
group  of  fruit.     Each,  diam.  7J  in. 

83.  Deep  Plate,  painted  in  colours  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1735. 

Saucer-shapod.    Painted  with  sprays  of  tree-peony  and  other  flowers.   Brown  edge.     Diam.  6J  in. 

84.  Plate,    painted    in    underglaze   blue    in    the    Chinese   style.       Mark    somewhat 

resembling  the  head  of  a  trident,  in  blue  (No.  12).     About  1770.     (Plate  13.) 
Painted    with  a  river-scene  in  which  are  a  man    fishing   from  a  boat,  a  fantastic   bird  on  a 

rock,  and  a  large  flowering  plant.  Narrow  rim  with  wavy  edge.  Diam.  5-J  in. 
This  plate  is  referred  by  Hobson  {Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  44)  to  the  Worcester  factory.  The 
character  of  the  paste  and  glaze,  however,  is  very  similar  to  that  of  the  pieces  described 
in  the  note  tn  No.  106  below,  whilst  the  painting  resembles  that  of  a  mug  in  private 
possession  of  the  same  form  as  Nos.  106  and  564,  and,  like  the  latter,  marked  with  an 
incised  cross.     Compare  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  p.  40. 

85.  Two  Plates,  printed  in  black,     .\bout  1770.     (Plate  13.) 

Each  printed  with  a  river-scene  in  wliich  are  swans  and  other  aquatic  birds.     Eacli,  diam.  $}  in. 


22  BOW. 

86.  Punch-bowl,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.  On  the  outside  are  emblems  of  Free- 
masonry in  medallions,  with  the  inscriptions  "AMOR  HONOR  ET  lUSTITIA," 
"NOUS  UIVONS  SUR  LE  OUARRE "  and  "MEMENTO  MORI."  Dated 
1768.     (Plate  13.) 

Between  the  medallions  are  sprays  of  flowers  somewhat  in  the  Chinese  style.  Round  the 
inside  is  a  scalloped  border,  and  on  the  bottom  are  a  book,  compasses,  and  a  set-square. 
H.  3J  in.,  diam.  8|  in. 

[87.  S.\ucEBOAT,  Bristol  porcelain,  sec  p.   140.] 

1 88,  89.   Sauceboats,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  8q.] 

90.  Pair  of  Salt-cellars,  painted  in  blue  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1750. 

Each  in  the  shape  of  a  large  shell,  painted  inside  with  a  willow,  fencing  and  a  rock,  and 
with  a  border  of  cresting  ;  supported  on  a  three-pointed  base  composed  of  smaller  shells 
and  rocks.     H.  2g  in.,  2 J  in.  respectively  ;  W.  of  each,  4„  in. 

91.  Salt  CELLAR,  painted    in  colours   and    gilt,  in  the    style    of  Japanese  Kakiyemon 

ware.     .'Vbout  1765. 

In  the  form  of  a  large  conventional  shell,  painted  inside  with  a  floral  spray  and  outside  with 
two  quails,  flowering  /)niKiis-tree  and  other  plants.  It  rests  on  rockwork  set  with  smaller 
shells.     H.  2a  '"■>  ^^'-  31  '"• 

92.  Knife-rest,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.     About  1750. 

Painted  with  flowers  and  decorated  with  beading  in  relief  along  the  edges.  L.  2|  in., 
W.  liin. 

93.  FiNGER-BowL,  printed  in  black.     About  1760.     (Plate  13.) 

Cylindrical  with  rounded  base.      Printed  outside  with   an   aquatic  scene  in  which  are  swans, 

ducks,  a  heron,  and  other  birds.     H.  3j  in.,  diam.  4  in. 
The  pair  of  swans,  which  form  part  of  the  printed  design,  figure  on  pi.  159  of    The   Ladies' 

Amusement  {see  p.  2). 

94.  Candlestick,    painted    in    colours  and  gilt  ;    copied    with  modifications   from  a 

.Meissen  model  designed  by  Johann  Joachim  Kaendler.     About  1770.     (Plate  2.) 

In  the  form  of  a  woman  partly  clad  in  flowered  drapery,  seated  on  a  rococo-scrolled  pedestal, 
clasping  in  her  arms  a  naked  boy  who  holds  a  leafy  scrolled  stem  surmounted  by  the 
grease-pan  and  socket.     H.  lOj  in. 

Mew,  pi.  xii.     Compare  also  Berling,  Aleissner  Porzellan,  fig.  76. 

95.  Candlestick,  painted  in   colours   and   gilt  ;    on    the   base    are  figures    of    an    old 

man    and    a    little    boy     warming    themselves    at    a    brazier,    emblematic     of 
Winter.     About  1770.     (Plate  2.) 

The  man  has  a  fur-lined  purple  cloak  thrown  round  him  and  stands  holding  his  hands  towards 
the  brazier,  which  rests  on  a  branch  of  the  scrolled  stem  supporting  the  grease-pan  and 
socket  of  the  candlestick.  The  boy  is  seated  on  a  stump,  drawing  round  his  body  yellow- 
drapery  painted  with  red  roses.  The  rococo-scrolled  base  is  decorated  with  applied 
flowers  and  foliage.     H.  iij-  in. 

Bought  at  .Amsterdam,  October  4th,  i86g,  see Jouynals,  i.,  p.  45,  "We  went  to  Boasberg's  in  the 
Calverstraat.     .     .     .     We  purchased     ...     a  fine  Bow  candlestick  representing  Winter." 

Mew,  pi.  xii. 

256.  Pair  of  Candlesticks.     About  1765. 

I'.acli  is  in  the  form  of  a  naked  figure  of  a  boy,  with  garlands  of  vine  bearing  bunches  of  grapes 
twisted  about  him,  holding  in  one  hand  a  cup  and  with  the  other,  supported  on  his  head, 
a  stem  which  terminates  in  a  foliated  nozzle  and  grease-pan.  He  is  seated  on  a  pedestal 
rising  from  a  rococo-scrolled  circular  base  painted  with  insects.     Each,  H.  8|  in. 


BOW.  23 

96.  juG,  painted   in  colours  and  gilt,  in  the  Chinese  style.     The  lip  has  been  broken 
oflf  and  replaced  in  silver.     Mark,  "  p"  "  in  red  (No.  7).     About   1760. 

Pear-shaped  body,  projecting  lip,  loop  handle,  spreading  foot.  On  either  side  is  a  yellow  bird 
perched  on  the  branch  of  a  flowering  pomegranate-tree  growing  on  a  rock.  Round  the 
rim  and  foot  are  floral  borders.  The  handle  is  painted  with  a  long  spray  of  flowers  and 
foliage  in  red.     H.  8\  in.,  diani.  6  in. 

Solon,  pi.  iv. 

[97.  Jug,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  ().  97.] 
[98-100.  Jugs,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  39.] 
[101,  102.  Jugs,  Meissen  porcelain,  sec  p.   167.] 
[103.   Mug,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  59.] 

104.  Mug,  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  5  incised  (No.  8).     About  1760. 

Inverted  bell  shaped,  with  scrolled  loop  handle  and  spreading  base.     Painted  on  one  side  with 

two  birds  and  a  tree,  on  the  other  with  a  bouquet  of  flowers.     H.  5J  in.,  diani.  3^  in. 
Similar  in  style  to  No.  57. 

105.  P.^iR  OF  Mugs,  painted  in  colours  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1760.      (Plate  13.) 

Cylindrical,  expanding  slightly  at  the  base,  with  loop  handle.  Painted  with  a  pheasant 
standing  on  a  rock  on  which  grow  flowering  plants.     Each,   H.  3^  in.,  diam.  3  in. 

The  attribution  of  these  pieces  to  Bow  is  doubtful.  The  pattern  is  that  of  a  service  said  to 
have  been  made  for  Sir  Joshua  Reynolds  at  Worcester  ;  see  note  on  No.  508. 

106.  Mug,  printed  in  black  and  painted  over  the  print   in  colours.     Mark,   a  cross  in 

red  (No.  11).     About  1770.     (Plate  13.) 

Cylindrical,  expanding  slightly  at  the  base,  reeded  loop  handle.     Decorated  on  the  front  wilh 

a  flowering  tree  in  the  Chinese  style.  H.  4°  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 
This  mug  is  of  the  same  form  as  one  in  the  Museum  (N'o.  3147— 1901),  marked  with  a 
faintly  incised  cross  and  painted  with  a  Chinese  landscape  in  blue,  which,  together  with 
a  cylindrical  bowl  (Xo.  3777 — 1901).  painted  by  the  same  hand  with  a  similar  landscape, 
has  been  ascribed  to  the  factory  at  Isleworth,  in  Middlesex.  This  factory  is  said  to  have 
been  carried  on  from  1760  for  about  forty  years.  The  authority  for  ihis  attribution  is 
unknown.  The  bowl  referred  to  is  marked  with  an  open  capital  "  I  "  above  three  dots  in 
blue.  A  characteristic  conmion  to  all  these  pieces  and  to  No.  564  (described  below)  is 
the  opacity  of  the  paste,  a  feature  of  the  later  porcelain  of  Bow.  Two  bowls  in  the 
British  Museum,  reputed  to  be  of  Isleworth  porcelain,  are  of  a  different  character.  The 
mark  of  a  cross  in  red  occurs  also  on  one  of  a  pair  of  dishes  (No.  65)  described  above. 
The  question  is  fully  discussed  in  the  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  p.  39,  where  this  mug 
and  No.  564  are  reproduced. 

564.   Mug,  printed  in  black.     Mark,  a  cross  incised.     About  1770.     (Plate  13.) 

Slightly  bell-shaped,  with  reeded  loop  handle.     Printed  with  two  parrots  perched  on  branches 

above  a  group  of  grapes  and  other  fruit.  H.  4f;  in.,  diam.  3:]  in. 
This  piece  was  formerly  ascribed  to  Worcester.  '1  he  form  of  the  handle  and  the  opaque 
character  of  the  paste  indicate  that  it  was  probably  made  at  How  in  the  later  years  of 
the  factory  ;  compare  note  on  No.  106.  .\  mug  of  somewhat  similar  form  with  painted 
decoration,  incised  with  the  initials  "RB"  and  ascribed  to  Bow,  is  in  the  British 
Museum.  Part  of  the  subject  of  the  decoration,  consisting  of  a  single  parrot  and  fruit, 
reversed,  with  modifications,  occurs  on  a  blue-printed  Caughley  porcel.iin  mug  in  the 
Museum  (No.  3348 — igoi). 
Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  illustration  f.icing  p.  39. 

107.  Mug,  painted  in  colours.     .About   1760.     (Plate  13.) 

Cylindriial,  spreading  slightly  at  the  base,  loop  handle.  Painted  wiiii  i-\otic  birds  among 
fruit-trees,  and  with  a  conventional  border  in   red      II.   5J  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 


-4 


ROW. 


fl08.  Mug,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p.   i6o.] 

109.   Ml'G  and  Covek,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1760.     (Pl.\ti;  13.; 

liell-sliaped,  with  loop  handle.  On  the  front  is  a  crest,  a  goat's  head  erased,  within  a  frame- 
work of  gilt  rococo  scrolls.  On  one  side  are  flowering  trees  and  sheaves,  on  the  other 
and  on  the  cover  are  sprays  of  flowers,  imitated  from  designs  on  Japanese  Kakiyemon 
ware.  Round  the  top  and'  the  edge  of  the  cover  is  a  border  of  cresting  in  red  and  gold. 
The  cover  is  surmounted  by  a  figure  of  a  pug-dog.     H.  8J  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  360. 

[110.  Mug,  Bristol  porcelain,  see  p.   141.] 

368.  Mug,  painted    in    colours    and    gilt.     Mark,  an    anchor    in    red  ;    another    mark, 
probably  a  dagger,  has  been  ground  off.     About   1770.     (Pl.\te  13.) 

Bell-shaped  with  loop  handle,  painted  on  either  side  with  a  group  of  fruit  in  colours  in  a  shaped 
panel  reserved  on  a  dark  blue  ground  and  surrounded  liygilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  floral 
sprays.     H.  4JJ  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

191.  Water-bottle    for  a  washstand,  painted   in   underglaze    blue,  with  a  powdered 
blue  ground   in  imitation  of  Chinese  porcelain.     About  1765. 

Bulbous  body  with  long  narrow  neck  and  convex  swelling  below  the  mouth.     Decorated  with 
Chinese  landscapes  and  flowers  within  three  fan-shaped  panels  and  six  smaller   circular  and 
heart-shaped  panels,  reserved  in  white  on  the  blue  ground.     The  convex  ring  is  painted  with 
Chinese  diaper  ornament.     H.  iij  in.,  diam.  ^J  in. 
Compare  Nos.  64,  514,  515. 

111.  Pair  of  Goblets,  painted  in  colours.     About  1760. 

Ovoid  body,  small  foot;  painted  with  a  bouquet  of  various  flowers  on  one  side  and  a  spray 

of  narcissus  on  the  other,  and  with  small  sprays  of  flowers  and  foliage  on  the  remaining 

surface.     Each,  H.  55-  in.  ;    diam.  43   in.,  4'  in.  respectively. 
Doubtfully  attributed  to  Bow. 

[112.    Tea-pov,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p.   160.] 

113.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  printed  in  purplish-brown  and  painted    in  colours  ;    on  one 

side  is  printed  an  equestrian  figure  and  on  the  other  a  half-length  portrait 
of  Frederick  the  Great,  King  of  Prussia,  with  the  words  "  the  Prussian 
Hero,"  repeated.  The  latter  is  copied  with  slight  modifications  from  a 
portrait  in  the  possession  of  Graf  von  Hochberg,  at  Rohnstock,  painted  by 
Antoine  Pesne  and  engraved  by  J.  G.  Wille.     About  1756.     (Plate  ii.) 

On  the  front  of  the  body  below  the  ribbed  spout,  which  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers, 
and  on  the  cover,  are  printed  trophies  of  arms.  The  loop  handle  is  in  the  form  of  a 
branching  stem,  from  which  spring  two  sprays  of  flowers  and  foliage  applied  to  the 
body  and  painted  in  colours.  The  handle  of  the  cover  is  also  in  the  form  of  a  small 
steni  with  coloured  flowers  and  foliage.  The  equestrian  portrait  shows  the  king  riding 
to  the  left  on  a  battlefield,  with  a  dead  soldier  on  the  ground  before  him.  .^bove  the 
bust  portrait  are  figures  of  Fame  with  two  trumpets  and  a  cupid  with  a  wreath  and 
a  lance.         H.  7I  in.,  diam.  6  in. 

Probably  made  about  the  time  of  Frederick  the  Great's  successes  in  the  Seven  Years'  War, 
and  his  convention  with  England  in  1756  against  France  and  her  .Mlies.  The  same 
bust-portrait  is  painted  on  a  Battersea  enamel  snuff-box  in  the  Collection,  .\o.  1555. 
Compare  Friedrich  cler  Crosse  in  der  Kiiiist,  pi.  9,  p.   17. 

Chaffers,  fig.  486. 

114.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  jiainted  in  colours  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1755. 

Barrel-shaped  with  loop  handle,  si.\-sided  curved  spout,  and  two  lines  of  beading  in  relief 
round  the  body.      Painted  with  sprays  of  tree-peony  and  chrysanthemum  and  insects. 


l^OW.  25 

[115.  Tea-pot,  Worcester  porcelain,  sec  p.  108.J 

[II6.  Tea-pot,  Meissen  porcelain,  see  p.  167.] 

[117.  Tea-pot,  Longton  Hall  porcelain,  ace  p.    122.] 

[II8.  Tea-pot,  Worcester  porcelain,  sec  p.  109.] 

119.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About  1750.     (Plate  13.) 

Moulded  in  the  form  of  large  overlapping  leaves  with  looped  stalk  forming  the  handle.  The 
leaves  are  tinted  green,  with  brown  or  crimson  midribs,  veins  and  edges.  In  the 
interstices  between  the  leaves  are  a  caterpillar  and  other  insects.     H.  4^  in.,  \V.  4^   m. 

The  attribution  to  Bow  is  uncertain. 

[120,  121.  CoEFEE-POTS,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  pp.  58,  59.] 

[122.  Jug,  Caughley  porcelain,  see  p.   150.] 

[123.  Toy  Tea-set,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p.   160.] 

[124,  125.  Cups  and  Saucers,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  118.] 

126.  Tea-cup,  Coffee-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours.     About  1770. 

All  three  pieces  are  painted  with  a  landscape,  in  which  are  ruined  buildings,  and  edged 
with  brown.  The  tea-cup  has  no  handle.  Tea-cup,  H.  if  in.,  diam.  i|  in.;  coffee-cup, 
H.  2'  in.,  diam.  2J  in.;  saucer,  diam.  4I  in. 

These  pie'ces  may  be  compared  with  the  dishes  No.  62,  which  are  marked  with  the  anchor 
and  dagger. 

127.  Cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in    imitation   of   Japanese    Kaki- 

vemon  ware.     About  1760. 

Both  pieces  are  painted  with  pomegranates,  insects,  and  sprays  of  flowers.  Cup,  H.  2]  in. 
diam.  sf  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  5  in. 

128.  Coffee-cup   and   Saucer,    moulded    in    relief   and   painted    in    underglaze    blue 

in    the  Chinese  style."   About  1770. 

Both  pieces  are  moulded  with  scale-pattern  and  painted  with  a  border  of  diaper  ornament. 
The  handle  of  the  cup  is  in  the  form  of  a  branching  twig  ;  in  the  middle  of  the  s.aucer 
is  painted  a  floral  spr.ay.     Cup,  H.  2|  in.,  diam.  sj  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  5;  in. 

From  the  same  mould  as  a  cup  and  saucer  in  the  Museum  (\'o.  2890— 1901)  marked  with  the 
anchor  and  dagger. 

[129,  130.  Cups  and  Saucers,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p.   159.] 

131.  Bowl,  printed  in  purplish-black,  partly  from  plates  by  Robert  Hancock.     About 

1755- 

Printed  inside  with  two  figures  beside  a  fence  (now  almost  obliterated  by  wear)  and  outside 
with  the  four  following  subjects  :— A  tea-party  in  a  garden,  combined  .with  a  group 
of  children  playing  with  a  wheeling  chair  ;  tw^o  beggar  women  w  ith  children  ;  a  gallant 
kissing  a  ladv's  hand  {L'Amour)  ;  and  birds  on  a  tree.       H.   3;   in.,  diam.  8i  in. 

Compare  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  72.  The  tea-partv  group  differs  from  that  which 
occurs  on  Worcester  porcelain  (c.^'.,  No.  668  in  the  Collection),  the  lady  and  gentleman 
being  attended  by  a  negro  page  carrying  a  kettle;  this  version,  with  the  signature  of 
Hancock,  printed  on  an  enamel  watch-back  assumed  to  have  been  made  at  Battersea,  is 
reproduced  in  Jewitt,  i.,  p.  234,  fig  518.  From  this  it  appears  possible  that  the  printing 
on  Bow  porcelain  may  have  been  executed  at  Battersea  ;  compare  p.  6  above.  For  the 
print  of  L'Aninur,  compare  note  on  No.  607. 


26  BOW. 

330.  Pair  of  Tuueens  and  Covers,  each  in  tlie  form  of  a  partridge  sitting  on  a  nest, 

with  stands,  painted  in  colours.     Tlie  tureens  are  copied  from  a  Meissen  model. 
About  1760. 

The  nest  is  bordered  wilh  a  wreath  of  ilowcrs  and  ears  of  wheat.  The  oval  stand  is  painted 
with  sprays  of  flowers  in  the  middle  and  a  brown  border  round  the  shaped  rim.  Tureens 
with  covers,  H.  4!  in.,  L.  j\  in. ;  stands,  I,.  8  in.,  W.  6^  in. 

In  connection  with  these  tureens  may  be  cited  an  entry  in  the  memorandum-book  of  John 
Howcocke,  dated  July  24th,  1756,  "To  buy  a  partridge  either  alive  or  dead."  Partridge 
tureens  were  also  made  at  Chelsea,  and  occur  in  the  Chelsea  sale  catalogues  of  the 
period,  e.g..  No.  59  in  that  of  March  29th,   1756. 

Bought  at  Brussels,  March  4th,  1872,  see  Journals,  i.,  132,  "Then  went  the  round  of  all  the  shops, 
amongst  which  we  laid  out  about  £\o  very  much  to  our  own  satisfaction  reckoning  that  we 
had  secured  objects  worth  nearly  £^o.  Among  them  was  a  pair  of  partridges  on  their 
nests  with  stands  painted  in  bouquets— very  perfect  and  all  of  old   Bow." 

Mrs.  Hodgson,  pi.  2.     Compare  also  Hirth,  Deutscit  Tanagra,  ii.,  pi.  26,  No.  30. 

331.  Pair  of  Tureens  and  Covers,  each  in  the  form  of  a  partridge  sitting  on  a  nest, 

with  stands,  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  inside   one   of   the    tureens  and  one  of 
the  covers  10,  inside  the  other  cover  3,  in  purple.     About   1760. 

The  nest  is  bordered  with  leaves  and  twisted  stems.  The  oval  stand  is  painted  with  a  bouquet 
and  sprays  of  flowers  in  the  middle  and  a  brown  border  round  the  wavy  rim.  Tureens 
and  covers,  H,  3I  in.,  3^  in.,  L.  5*  in.,  5  in.  respectively  ;  stands,  L.  7^  in.,  7  in.  respectively, 
W.  5J  in. 

Compare  note  on  No.  330. 

359.  Dessert-basket  and  Stand,  painted  in  colours.     About  1760. 

The  basket  has  two  twisted  loop  handles  rising  above  the  rim,  with  flowers  applied  at  the  points 
of  attachment  ;  the  sides  are  of  openwork,  curving  outwards,  with  rosettes  in  relief  at  the 
intersections.  Inside,  on  the  bottom,  is  a  bouquet.  The  stand  is  moulded  in  the  form  of 
vine-leaves  (on  which  are  painted  bouquets),  laid  over  one  another  on  a  tray  with  openwork 
rim  decorated  with  rosettes  at  the  intersections.  Basket,  H.  3^  in.,  W.  6j  in.  ;  stand, 
diam.  8J-  in. 

669.    Tea- CUP  and  S.\ucer,  printed  and  painted  in  crimson,  and  gilt.     About  1760. 

Both  pieces  have  a  wavy  edge  and  a  border  of  basketwork  pattern  moulded  in  relief  Out- 
side the  cup  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  group  of  children,  playing  in  a  land- 
scape, printed  and  touched  up  by  painting.  The  cup  has  no  handle,  and  is  painted  in  colours 
inside  in  the  bottom  with  a  butterfly.     Cup,   H.  i|  in.,  diam.  3I  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  5^  in. 

Doubtfully  attributed  to  Bow. 

132.  Oval  Mould  of  porcelain,  impressed  with  a  spray  of  prunus-hXossom  and  foliage, 
used  for  moulding  sprigs  to  be  applied  as  relief  decoration.  Found  by 
Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  in  March,  1868,  in  excavations  on  the  site  of  the 
Bow  porcelain  works,  then  occupied  by  Messrs.  Bell  and  Black's  (later,  Bryant 
and  May's)  match  factory.     L.  3     in.,  W.  2\  in. 

Jcwitt,  lig.  409  ;  Chaffers,  Marks  and  Monograms,  13th  edit.,  I'lg.  13,  p.  9^3.    See  note  on  .\o.  132(1. 

132a.  Twenty-seven  Fragments  of  Vessels,  found  by  Lady  Charlotte   Schreiber   in 

March,    1868,    in    excavations   on    the   site   of   the    Bow    porcelain    works,  then 

occupied  by  Messrs.  Bell  and  Black's  (later,  Bryant  and  May's)  match  factory. 

Seventeen  are  unglazed  "  wasters  "    from    the   kiln,  one   consisting    of    two    portions  of  cups 

adhering    together.     Four    have    moulded   relief    decoration  ;  five    are    ornamented    with 

applied   sprays   of  />ra««s-blossom  in  imitation  of  Chinese  (Fuchien)  porcelain ;  six  others 

are  painted  in  blue  in  the  Chinese  style.     Largest  fragment,  VV.  3J  in. 

Compare  Jewitt,  i.,  p.  203.     Chaffers,  Marks  and  Monograms,   13th  edition,  p.  935. 


BOW.  27 

§  6.   PIECES    FOR    DOMESTIC    USE,    WHITE. 
Nos.  135-163. 

The  following  pieces  are  left  unpainted  ;  most  of  them  have  relief 
decoration,  either  cut  in  the  mould  in  which  the  object  was  shaped, 
or  moulded  separately  and  applied  to  the  surface. 

[133,   134.   Busts,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  pp.  31,  32.] 

[135-137.    FiGURi-s,   Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   14.] 

[138-140.   Figures  .vnd  Groups,  Clielsea  porcelain,  see  p.  32.] 

[141-143.   Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   15.] 

[144,   145.   Figures,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  pp.  32,  33.] 

[146-149.   Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   15.] 

[150.   Figure,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  33.] 

[151.   Figure,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   15.] 

152.  JAR  AND  Cover.     About  1755.     {Plate  g.) 

Ovoid  with  vertical  grooves ;  round  the  middle  are  festoons  of  drapery  hanging  from  rings  in 
relief.     On  the  top  of  the  cover  is  a  group  of  foliage  and  fruit.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

[153.  Pair  of  Pedestals,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  33.] 

154.  Pair  of  Sweetmeat-dishes.     About  1755.     (Plate  9.) 

Each  in  the  form  of  a  conventional  shell,  encrusted  with  three  murex  shells  forming  supports, 
a  limpet,  other  smaller  shells  and  coral.  Of  the  same  model  as  No.  90.  H.  3J  in., 
W.  5^  in. 

No.  I54«,  Solon,  fig.  2. 

155.  P\iR  OF  Salt-cellars.     About  1750.     (Plate  9.) 

Kach  in  the  form  of  a  large  shell  resting  on  a  heap  of  smaller  shells  and  barnacles.  II.  2J  in., 
W.  4J   in.,  45   in.  rospertively. 

156.  Mug,    decorated  with    applied    sprays    of    /jruHHS-blossom    moulded    in    relief,    in 

imitation  of  Chinese  (Fuchien)  porcelain.     About  1755. 

Bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle  terminating  in  a  heart ;  decorated  with  Ihrce  large  and  four 
smaller  />r!ini(ssprays.     II.  6J  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 

[157.  Crea.\i-jug,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  33. J 


28  BOW. 

158.  CuEAM-STOOP,    in    the    form    of    a    wooden  piggin,  with    spoon,  decorated    with 

applied  sprigs    of  pruiius-blossom  in    relief,  in    imitation   of  Chinese  (Fuchienj 
porcelain.     About  1755.     (Plate  9.) 

Cylindrical,  with  thrce-puinted  handle  rising  vertically  above  the  rim.  The  spoon  lias  a 
round  reeded  bowl  and  long  curved  handle.     H.  2|  in.,  diam.  2]  in. ;  spoon,  L.  3}  in. 

159.  TuA-POT  AND  Cover.     About   1755.     (Plate  g.) 

Globular  body  moulded  in  relief  on  either  side  with  sprays  of  conventional  roses ;  the  cover 
is  decorated  with  sunilar  sprays.  The  spout  and  loop  handle  are  ornamented  with 
scrolls.     H.  5J  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

[160.  Cup  and  Saucer,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  33.] 

[I6I.   Cups,  Ciielsea  porcelain,  see  p.  33.] 

162.  Tea-cup,   Coffee-cup    and    Saucer,    decorated    with   applied    sprays    of    pruniis- 

blossom    in    relief,    in  imitation  of   Chinese  (F"uchien)  porcelain.      About   1755. 
(Plate  g.j 

The  tea-cup  and  saucer  have  a  wavy  rim  ;  the  former  has  no  handle.  The  coffee-cup  has 
a  scrolled  loop  handle.  Tea-cup,  H.  i\  in.,  diam.  2j  in. ;  coffee-cup,  H.  2J-  in.,  diam.  2 J  in.  ; 
saucer,  diam.  4I  in. 

163.  Two  Coffee-cups,    decorated    with    applied  sprays   of  /jrwiiHs-blossoni  in   relief, 

in  imitation  of  Chinese  (Fuchien)  porcelain.  .  About  1755. 

Each,  H.  2.1  in.,  diam.  2.5  in. 

164.  Two   Egg-cups,   decorated   with  applied  sprays   of  ^laoiKs-blossom  in  relief,    in 

iinitation  of  Chinese  (Fuchien)  porcelain.     About  1755.     (Plate  9.) 
Each,  H.  25  in.,  diam.  2  in. 

165.  Eight  Knife-handles,  moulded  in  relief.     About   1755. 

165.     Of  pistol-butt  form,  moulded  with  flowers  and  foliage  on  interlaced  stems.     L.  4}  in. 
165a.  Of  pistol-butt    form,  moulded    with    a    conventional    tloral    stem    on    a    dotted    ground. 

L.  4  in. 
165b.  Of  octagonal  section,  with  end   curving  to   a  sharp  edge.      Moulded  with   conventional 

flowers  and  scrollwork     L.  35  in. 
165c  Similar  to  No.  165.     L.  3.5  in. 

ib-fd.  Of  pistol-butt  form,  moulded  with  conventional  scrollwork  and  floral  sprays.     L.  3I  in, 
165^.  Of  pistol-butt  form,  moulded  with  floral  stems  enclosed  by  reeding.     L.  3f  in. 
165/.  Of  pistol-butt  form,  moulded  with  sprays  of  Chinese  /lyuHHS-blossom.     L.  3J  in. 
165^.  Of  pistol-butt  form,  moulded  with  flowers  and  foliage  on  interlaced  stems.     L.  3  in 


II.— CHELSEA. 


THE  date  of  the  foundation  of  the  porcelain  works  at  Chelsea  and  the 
name  of  their  founder  are  alike  unknown,  but  two  milk-jugs  with 
the  name  "  Chelsea  "  incised  on  the  base,  the  earliest  known  pieces 
of  English  porcelain  bearing  a  date,^  prove  that  the  factory  already  existed 
in  1745,  and,  to  judge  by  the  quality  of  their  technique,  that  it  could  not 
at  that  time  have  been  quite  recently  established.  In  its  earlier  years 
the  factory  enjoyed  the  patronage  of  George  II.  and  his  son,  the  Duke 
of  Cumberland.-  The  first  proprietor  and  director  of  whom  any  mention 
has  been  preserved  was  Charles  Gouyn  ;  from  a  newspaper  announce- 
ment of  January,  1750,  it  may  be  inferred  that  he  had  then  been  lately 
succeeded  in  the  management  of  the  factory  by  Nicolas  Sprimont,  a 
silversmith,  of  Compton  Street,  Soho.  Both  Gouyn  and  Sprimont 
were  probably  of  Flemish  nationality,  though  the  latter  is  described  by 
Horace  Walpole  as  a  Frenchman.^  In  1769  Sprimont  was  obliged,  on 
account  of  ill-health,  to  abandon  his  position  and  to  sell  the  works  to 
.one  James  Cox.  In  the  following  year  they  again  changed  hands  and 
were  sold  to  William  Duesbury  and  John  Heath,  of  Derby,  the  former  of 
whom  in  1776  acquired  also  the  factory  at  Bow.*  The  objects  made  at 
Chelsea  between  1770  and  1784,  the  year  in  which  the  factory  was  finally 
■closed  and  dismantled,  are  described  under  the  heading  of  Chelsea-Derby 
porcelain.^ 

The  earliest  porcelain  made  at  Chelsea,  of  a  very  translucent  creamy 
paste  resembling  f)paque  white  glass,  may  be  identified  by  the  help  of  the 
milk-jugs  with  the  date  1745  already  mentioned.  The  models  were  in 
many  cases  derived  from  silversmith's  work*"' ;  painted  decoration  in  the 
form  of  scattered  sprays  or  small  detached  flowers  was  sometimes  sparingly 
introduced.^     The  mark  employed  was  a  triangle  incised  in  the  paste.** 

About  the  middle  of  the  century,  presumably  at  the  time  of  the  change 
in  the  management,  another  type  of  paste  appears  to  have  been  introduced, 
of  denser  texture  and  colder  appearance,  the  glaze  in  plain  white  pieces 
being  often  distinctly  blueish  in  tone."  The  mark  on  productions  of  this 
second  period  consists  of  a  small  oval  medallion  applied  to  the  surface 

^  See  Archaeological  Journal,  vol.  xix.  (1862),  p.  343. 
-  Compare  No.  133.         ''  See  note  on  T<o.  254 ;  compare  also  Cliuicli,  p.  18. 
^  See  p.  4.  ■'  .See  p.  65.  0  No.  157."  '  No.  333.  "  No.  157. 

'••  Nos.  134,  138,  139,  150. 


30  CHKLSEA. 

with  an  anchor  in  relief  upon  it.  Statuettes  began  to  be  made  in  con- 
siderable quantity,  among  them  figures  of  birds  and  animals  in  imitation 
of,  tliougli  not  directly  copied  from,  those  made  at  Meissen,  generally 
coloured  after  nature  with  some  attempt  at  realism. ^  Vases  and  "  useful  " 
ware  were  painted  cither  with  scattered  bouquets  and  insects  in  the 
manner  of  Meissen  porcelain  of  the  period'  or  in  Oriental  style.  For  the 
latter  the  designs  were  derived  mostly  from  the  Japanese  porcelain  of  the 
school  of  Kakiyemon.^     Chinese  porcelain  was  less  frequently  imitated.* 

These  styles  were  continued  through  the  following  decade,  at  an  early 
date  in  whicli  a  painted  anchor,  generally  in  red  over  the  glaze,^  replaced 
the  anchor  in  relief  as  the  mark  of  the  factory.  That  the  two  marks  were 
for  a  time  used  concurrently  is  shown  by  a  pair  of  figure  (No.  167)  bearing 
one  the  earlier,  the  other  the  later  form  of  mark ;  the  same  inference  is 
supported  by  the  occurrence  of  the  anchor  in  relief  picked  out  in  red.'"' 
The  developments  of  style  may  be  followed  with  the  aid  of  the  announce- 
ments of  the  periodical  auction  sales  at  which  the  output  of  the  factory 
was  offered  to  the  public.  In  1734  the  first  mention  of  scent-bottles  and 
other  small  trinkets  occurs  in  announcements  which  appeared  in  the 
Public  Advertiser  of  the  sale,  "by  order  of  the  Proprietors  of  the  Chelsea 
Porcelain  Manufactory"  of  "AH  the  entire  Stock  of  Porcelain  Toys, 
brought  from  their  Warehouse  in  Pall  Mall;  consisting  of  Snuff-boxes, 
Smelling-bottles,  Etwees  and  Trinkets  for  Watches  (mounted  in  Gold 
and  unmounted)  in  various  beautiful  Shapes,  of  an  elegant  Design,  and 
curiously  painted  in  Enamel."  Objects  of  this  description  continued  to 
be  made  until  the  closing  of  the  factory  and  afterwards  by  Duesbury 
at  Derby  ;  the  specimens  in  the  collection^  are  shown  by  their  style 
of  decoration  to  cover  the  whole  range  of  dates. 

The  figures  made  between  1750  and  1760  are  characterised  by  delicacy 
of  modelling  and  restrained  colouring.^     Bouquets  of  flowers,  landscapes, 

'  No.  150. 

-  Nos.  "245,  334,  335,  37S,  386,  401.  It  appears  that  in  1751  pieces  of  Meissen 
porcelain,  then  in  the  charge  of  Henry  Fox,  afterwards  Lord  HoUand,  at  Holland  House, 
Kensington,  but  the  property  of  Sir  Charles  Hanbury  Williams,  British  Plenipotentiary 
at  Dresden,  were  lent  for  copying  at  Chelsea  to  Sir  Everard  Faulkener,  who  was 
interested  in  the  factory.  See  letter  from  the  Earl  of  Ilchester  in  the  Burlington  Magazine, 
vol.  XX.  (1911-12),  p.  361. 

^  Nos.  375,  382,  383,  403,  405.  At  a  later  date  the  so-called  "  Imari  ware"  of  the 
Arita  kilns  was  copied;  compare  No.  337.  It  is  probable  that  some  of  the  Chelsea 
vases  in  Japanese  style  were  copied  not  from  Japanese  originals  but  from  imitations  of 
them  made  at  Meissen. 

*  Nos.  349,  373.  °  Nos.  219,  3.(0,  373,  &c.  '■  Nos.  206,  210,  211,  tScc. 

'<  Nos.  262-327.  **  Nos.  167,  171,  173,  175,  208. 


CHELSEA.  31 

and  tigures  of  birds  or  insects  distributed  irregularly  over  the  surface,  are 
the  favourite  motives  of  decoration  on  the  "  useful "'  wares. 

In  a  sale  catalogue  of  1756  the  first  mention  is  found  of  mazarine-blue," 
the  earliest  of  the  rich  ground  colours  imitated  from  the  Sevres  porcelain 
of  the  period  but  originated  at  Meissen  in  the  earlier  stages  of  that  factory. 
This  is  followed  in  1759  by  pea-green,  in  1760  by  turquoise-blue-  and 
claret-colour.^  These  innovations  were  accompanied  by  an  entire  change 
in  the  character  of  the  wares.  Extravagance  of  modelling  with  elaborate 
rococo  scrollwork,  sumptuous  colouring  and  profuse  gilding  supersede  the 
relatively  simple  decoration  of  earlier  times,  while  the  even  cream-coloured 
glaze  gives  place  to  a  glass-like  glaze  of  greenish  tone  \\hich  collects  in 
thick  drops  or  pools  of  liquid  appearance  wherever  an  angle  or  hollow 
affords  it  lodgment. 

The  set  of  groups  modelled  by  the  French  sculptor  Roubiliac*  may  be 
cited  as  characteristic  examples  of  this  style,  the  date  of  which  is 
indicated  by  the  service  made  in  1763  as  a  gift  from  Queen  Charlotte  to 
ihe  Duke  of  Mecklenburg-Strelitz^  and  the  large  mazarine-blue  vases 
presented  in  the  same  year  to  the  British  Museum.  Very  shortly  after 
this  a  reversion  to  a  simpler  taste,  illustrated  by  the  figures  of  Conway, 
Wilkes  and  Chatham,''  anticipates  the  subdued  colouring  and  classical 
forms  which  were  in  vogue  after  1770.  From  about  1759  onwards  the 
mark  ordinarily  used  was  an  anchor  in  gold";  this  continued  in 
occasional  use  at  Chelsea  for  some  time  after  1770.  An  exceptional  mark 
is  that  of  the  crossed  swords  in  imitation  of  the  Meissen  mark.''' 


sj  I.     STATUETTES  AX  I)  BUSTS,  WHUTE. 

Nos.   133-132. 

These  pieces  all  date  from  about  the  middle  of  the  iSth  century. 

133.  Bust  of  Willi.\m  .Xugustus,  Duke  of  Cumberland,  second  son  of  King  George  II., 
patron  of  the  Chelsea  factory  (b.  1721,  d.  1765).     About  1750.     (Plate  14.) 

Tlic  duUe  is  wearing  a  breastplate  and  tlie  ribbon  of  an   order.    The  bust   has  a  turned   wood 

pedestal.     Bust,  H.  4I  in.  ;  pedestal,  sight  measure,  H.  35  in.,  diam.  3  in. 
Similar  busts  occur  with  the  mark  of  an  .inchor  in  relief. 


1  Nos.  241,  250,  251,  254,  257,  264,  283,  347,  362,  389,  398,  439. 

-  No.  258.  •■'  Nos.  239,  336. 

'  Xos.  192,  193,  marked  with  an  impressed  "  R";  compare  also  note  on  No.   178. 

'  No.  254.  "  Nos.  200-202. 

Nos.  196,  246,  &c. ;  the  red  anclior  is  of  rare  occurrence  on  pieces  of  this  period. 

**  No.  401. 


32  CHELSEA. 

134.  Bust    or    King    Gilorgic    II.    (1727-1760),    on    detached    pedestal.      .\bout     1750. 
(Pl.vte  14.) 

Tlie  king  wears  a  large  wig  and  a  loose  cloak  clasped  in  front  over  an  embossed  cuirass  ;  the 
Order  of  the  Garter  is  partly  concealed  by  the  cloak.  His  head  is  turned  towards  the  left. 
The  pedestal  has  a  bowed  front  with  a  moulded  panel.     H.  lyi  in.,  W.  iif  in. 

'l"he  bust  was  formerly  erroneously  described  as  being  copied  from  a  statue  by  Rysbrack  in 
Oueen's  Square,  IJristol  ;  this  statue,  however,  represents  King  William  III.,  in  whose 
memory  it  was  erected  in  1736.  A  statue  of  George  II.  by  Rysbrack  at  Greenwich,  executed 
in  17^5,  represents  the  king  as  a  Roman  Emperor;  it  is  possible  that  the  present  bust 
may  be  copied  from  a  statue  by  Rysbrack  made  for  the  old  Royal  Exchange  and 
presumably  destroyed  when  that  building  was  burnt  down  in  183S.  A  similar  bust  in 
the  British  .Museum  is  figured  in  Solon,  fig.  7.  .\nother  on  loan  in  the  National  Museurn, 
Dublin,  rests  on  a  wall-bracket,  also  in  porcelain,  of  rococo  style,  with  figures  of  Britannia 
and  Cupid  modelled  in  high  relief;  illustrated  in  Bulletin,  ii,  part  iii,  pi.  vi. 

Bought  in  Edinburgh,  in  October,  1869 ;  see  Journals,  i  ,  p.  57,  "  Lady  Hopetoun  took  us 
into  Edinburgh  to  the  shop  of  one  Butti  in  Oueen  Street.  The  first  thing  that  met  the 
gaze  of  the  delighted  C.  S.  was  a  Plymouth  "bust  (with  pedestal)  of  King  George  II., 
exactly  the  same  as  that  which  belonged  to  the  late  Dr.  Cookworthy,  of  Plymouth, 
which  came  to  him  from  the  manufacturers  and  which  he  has  left  as  an  heirloom  in  the 
family.  Butti  (knowing  nothing  of  its  extreme  value)  sold  it  to  us  for  £$."  The 
mistaken  attribution  to  Plymouth  appears  to  be  b.Tsed  upon  Jevvitt,  i.,  p.  333. 

[135-137.  Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  14.] 

138.  Nurse  with  .\  Child.     Copied  from  statuettes  made  from  a  model  by  Barthelemy 

de  Blemont,  at  Avon,  near  Fontainebleau,  late  in  the  i6th  century.     Mark,  an 
anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About  1750.     (Pl.a.te  15.) 

She  is  dressed  in  costume  of  the  i6th  century,  seated  on  a  low  pedestal,  with  the- child  wrapped 

in  swaddling-clothes  on  her  lap.  H.  7J  in. 
.\  "  Chellsea  nurs  "  is  included  in  the  list  of  figures  enamelled  by  William  Duesbury  in  1751-3  : 
see  Bemrose,  Bow,  Chelsea  and  Derby,  p.  17.  Three  examples  of  this  figure  are  cited  in  the 
Archaeological  Journal,  xix.  (1S62),'  p.  343.  The  original  figure  is  sometimes  erroneously 
attributed  to  Bernard  Palissy  and  described  as  the  "  Xourrice  de  Francois  Premier." 
Compare  Delange,  CEuvre  de  Bernard  Palissy,  pi.  8g  ;  Solon,  French  Faience,  p.  35  ; 
Papillon,  Guide  du  Musec  Ceramique,  Sevres,  illus.  on  p.  54. 

139.  Hercules  and  Omphale.     Copied  with  slight  modifications  from  an  engraving 

bv  Laurent  Cars  after  a  picture  painted  in    1724  by   Francois  I,emoyne,   now 
ill  the  Musee  du  Louvre,  Paris.      About  1750.     (Pl.\te  16.) 

Hercules  is  seated  on  a  rock  with  drapery  hanging  loosely  about  him,  while  Omphale  stands 
beside  him  girt  with  the  lions  skin,  her  right  arm  thrown  round  his  neck  and  her  left 
supporting  his  club.  H.  Sf  in. 
In  the  sale,  bv  Mr.  Christie,  of  the  stock. in-trade  of  Mr.  Thomas  Turner  in  1767,  "a  fine  white 
Chelsea  "group  of  Hercules  and  Omphale"  fetched  £1  is.;  see  Xightingale,  p.  xxxviii. 
Compare  also  Mantz,  Boucher,  p.  18.  A  similar  model  w-as  produced  at  Ludwigsburg ; 
see  Wanner-Brandt,  Alt-Ludwigsburg,  fig.  66. 

140.  Group,  representing  a  Chinaman  about  to  chastise   a    little    boy.      .Vbout    1745. 

(Plate  17.) 

The  man  wears  a  large  hat,  and  a  long  cloak  thnjwn  over  an  ample  mbo.  and  has  very  long 

moustaches.     The  boy  is  clad  in  a  long  robe  and  pointed  cap.     H.  gj  in. 
Solon,  fig.  I. 

[141-143.  Figures,   Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   15.] 

144.  Pair  oe   Figures  of  Sphin.xes.     Mark    on   the    front  of   tlie    base,  an    anclior   in 
relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About  1750. 

Each  is  represented  in   a  recumbent  attitude  on  an  oblong  base.     ICach,  H.  3i  in.,  L.  6  in. 


CHELSEA.  33 

145.   Lion.     About   1745. 

Recumbent  on  an  oval  base.     H.  ji  in.,  L.  4  in. 

[146-149.  Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  15.] 

150.  Candlestick,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  stork,  made  in  imitation  of  a  Chinese 
porcelain  joss-stick  holder.  Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval 
medallion  (No.   16).     About  1750. 

Standing  pluming  itself  beside  a  tree-stump.     H.  gj  in. 

"  2  cranes  as  candlesticks  "  figure  in  the  catalogue  of  the  stock-in-trade  of  Thomas  Turner  sold 
by  Mr.  Christie  in  1767;  see  Nightingale,  p.  xxxviii. 

[151.   Figure,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  15.] 

[152.  Jar,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  27.] 


§  2.     PIECES  FOR  DOMESTIC  USE,  WHITE. 
Nos.   153-166. 

These  pieces  are  decorated  only  with  ornament  in  relief,  moulded  or 
applied  to  the  surface  ;  they  all  date  from  about  the  middle  of  the 
18th  century. 

153.   Pair  of  Pedestals,  nmoulded    in  relief.     Mark,    an    anchor    in   relief  on  an  oval 
medallion  applied  to  one  side  at  the  top.     About  1750. 

Square  with  moulded  cornice  and  plinth ;  on  each  side  is  a  spray  of  flowers  hanging  by  a 
ribbon  in  a  rococo-scrolled  panel.     Each,  H.  3  in. ;  i|  in.  square. 

[154-156.  S\vEETME.\T-DiSHES,  Salt-cellars  AND  MuG,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  27.] 

157.  Cream-jug,  moulded  in  relief.      Mark,  a  triangle  incised  (No.  15).     About  1745. 
(Plate  14.) 

The  jug  is  supported  on  the  backs  of  two  goats  lying  down,  and  has  a  handle  in  the  form  of 
a  leafy  oak-twig.  In  front  under  the  lip  is  an  applied  spray  of  flowers.  H.  4I  in., 
W.  2|  in.  .       , 

Another  similar  jug,  with  the  mark  "Chelsea  1745'  accompanied  by  a  triangle  incised,  is 
figured  by  Jewitt,  i.,  p.  193.  The  pattern  is  copied  from  silversmith's  work ;  a  version 
of  it  in  silver,  with  the  London  hall-mark  for  the  year  lyiJ-S,  was  formerly  in  the 
Willett  Collection. 

[158,  159.  Cream-stoop  and  Tea-pot,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  28.] 

160.  Cup   and    Saucer,  moulded   in   relief.      Mark    on   the  cup,   a    triangle    incised. 

About  1745. 

Tlie  cup  has  no  handle  and  is  mouldod  in  the  form  of  twisted  overlapping  leaves ;  the  saucer 
is  decorated  with  a  wreath  of  foliage.  Both  pieces  have  a  scalloped  rim.  H.  i^  in., 
diam.  2J  in.;  saucer,  diam.  4^  in. 

161.  Two  Cups,  moulded  in  relief.     About  1750.     (Pl.\te  14.) 

l)p((.ratcd  with  fluting,  over  which  are  curved  sprays  of  flowers  in  relief  springing  from  the 
base.     Expanding  rim  with  wavy  edge.     Each,  H.  2j  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 


34  CHKI.SKA. 

[162-165.  Cups,  Sal'ckrs,  Egg-cups,  and  Knifr-handlis,  Bow  porcelain,  sec  p.  28.] 

166.  ScENT-iioTTLE   AND   STOPPER,   in   the    form  of   a    figure    of   a   boy   with    a    goat. 

Copied  from  a  Meissen  porcelain  model.     About  1755.     (Plate  14.) 

The  goat  is  attempting   to  butt    the  boy,  who  stands  hf)l<!ing  one  of  its  horns  beside  a  tree- 
trunk  festooned  with  vine.     H.  4  in. 
Compare  Fischer,  Sammlung  Alt-Meissticr  Porzelliin,  pi.  .xxii.,  No.  477. 

[I'or  other  scent-bottles  in  plain  wiiitc  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  Nos.  279,  301,  pp.  49,  52.] 

§  3.  STATUETTES  AND  GROUPS,  COLOURED. 
Nos.   167-205. 

These  pieces  are  all  painted  in  enamel  colours  over  the  glaze.  Except 
in  the  case  of  three  of  the  earliest  examples  Nos.  167,  (171,  17.5,)  gilding 
has  also  been  added  ;  in  the  later  pieces  it  is  profusely  applied  and 
highly  burnished. 

167.  Pair    of    Figures   of   dwarfs,   a    man   and  a  woman.     Mark,  on  the    former,  an 

anchor  in  relief,  painted  in  red,  on  an  applied  oval  medallion  ;  on  the  latter, 
an  anchor  in  red.     About  1755.     (Plate  18.) 

The  man  wears  a  high  conical  hat  with  feathers  on  one  side,  a  tunic  with  slashed  yellow 
sleeves  and  big  black  buttons,  a  pink  fringed  belt,  and  black  shoes,  and  carries  a  sword 
at  his  right  side.  The  woman  is  dressed  in  a  white  cap  and  bodice,  flowered  skirt,  and 
red  shoes,  and  stands  on  a  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.  H.  65  in.,  5j  in. 
respectively. 

Figures  from  the  same  model  afterwards  made  at  Derby  are  described,  under  No.  227  in  the 
price  list  of  that  factory,  as  a  "Pair  Clrotesque  Punches";  see  Haslem,  p.   175. 

Acquired  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  in  August,  1869,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  36,  "On  the  28th 
Mr.  Emerson  Norman  of  Norwich  came.  .  .  .  He  brought  up  with  him  a  Chelsea  figure 
of  a  dwarf,  in  a  large  hat  (marked  with  a  raised  anchor)  and  a  female  figure  to  match 
(marked  with  a  red  anchor)  .  .  .  These  we  obtained  in  excliange  ....  These 
figures  are  a  great  addition  to  our  collection." 

168.  Pair  of  Figures.     A  pedlar  and  his  wife.     .About   1760.     (Plate  19.) 

Both  figures  stand  supported  by  a  tree-stump  on  a  round  base,  with  applied  flowers  and 
foliage.  The  man  has  a  basket  of  bottles  slung  in  front  of  him  ;  he  is  dressed  in  a  fur 
cap,  long  greenish-blue  fur-lined  coat,  white  waistcoat,  and  blue  and  yellow  striped 
breeches.  His  wife  carries  a  box  of  trinkets  fastened  round  her  waist,  and  wears  a  white 
cap,  red  cape,  purple  dress,  and  flowered  petticoat.     H.   io|  in.,   10  in.  respectively. 

Exhibited  in  the  Loan  Collection  at  the  Salisbury  and  South  Wilts  Museum,  Salisbury,  in 
1872;  see  Read,  Porcelain  Statuettes,  p.   16S. 

Chaffers,  fig.  505. 

[l69.  Figure,  Longton   Hall   porcelain,  see  p.  121.] 

170.  Group.     Tlie  three  Maries.     At  the  back  is  a  socket  for  the  insertion  of  a  wooden 
cross.     About  1760.     (Plate  19.) 

The  Virgin  stands  with  clasped  hands,  wrapped  in  a  turquoise  blue  cloak  over  a  flowered 
robe.  One  of  the  other  Maries  stands  behind  her,  with  right  arm  stretched  out  as  a 
support  to  the  cross,  whilst  the  third  is  seated  in  contemplation  at  her  side.  H.  10^  in., 
W.  g\  in. 

Chaffers,  fig.  50G. 


CHELSEA.  35 

171.  Leda  and  the  Swan.     Adapted  from  a  painting  by  Francois  Boucher,  exhibited 

in  1742,  now  in  the  National  Museum,  Stockhohii.  Mark,  an  anchor  in  red. 
About  1755.     (Pl.ate  20.) 

Leda  is  seated  on  a  tree-stump,  slightly  draped  in  a  pink  mantle,  looking  down  with  a 
gesture  of  surprise  at  the  swan  by  her  side;  a  cupid  also  stands  beside  her.  H.  63  in., 
W.  6|  in. 
An  attendant  nymph  in  the  original  composition  has  been  replaced  by  the  figure  of  Cupid  ; 
compare  Michel,  Franfois  lioucher,  p.  192  ;  Nolhac,  i-'raiifoi's  Boucher,  pi.  32.  A  Sevres 
biscuit  porcelain  group  after  the  same  original  is  in  the  Museum,  Xo.  382  — 1S74. 

172.  Three    Figures    of   monkeys,   copied    from    Meissen   figures   belonging   to   a    set 

known  as  the  "  Affeitkapelle,"  modelled  by  Johann  Joachim  Kaendler,  about 
1740,  as  a  caricature  of  the  Saxon  Court  Orchestra  at  Dresden.  Mark  on  each, 
an  anchor  in  red.     About  1755.     (Plate  18.) 

Two  are  dressed  as  men,  and  one  as  a  woman  in  costume  of  the  period.  Both  the  former 
are  standing  :  one,  wearing  a  cocked  hat,  a  yellow  short-sleeved  tunic,  and  purple  breeches, 
is  playing  a  pipe  and  a  side  drum  ;  the  other,  clothed  in  a  green  and  purple  cap,  loose 
white  shirt,  and  purple  breeches,  carries  two  draped  kettle-drums  slung  on  his  shoulders. 
The  female  wears  a  lace  cap  tied  with  ribbons  and  a  flowered  Watteau  dress  over  a 
yellow  bodice  and  skirt  ;  she  is  seated  in  a  folding  chair,  singing  from  a  music-book 
open  on  her  knees.  All  three  figures  are  supported  on  rococo  scrolled  bases,  with  applied 
flowers  and  foliage.  H.  6|  in.,  j  in.,  5I  in.  respectively. 
In  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  Chelsea  factory  for  1736  frequent  mention  is  made  of  "Musical 
figures  representing  monkies  in  different  attitudes,"  or  "  monkies  playing  on  music." 
Compare  Berling,  Meissner  Porsellan,  p.  92 ;  Fischer,  Sammlung  Alt'Meissiier  Porzellan, 
pi.  xxxvii.,  figs.   148,   150,   159. 

173.  Pair    of    Figures    of    little    girls,    emblematic    of    Painting    and    Astronomy. 

-Mark  on  each,  an  anchor  in  red.     .'Vbout  1755.     (Plate  18.) 

Both  figures  are  draped  round  the  waist,  and  wear,  the  one  a  gold  chain  round  her  neck, 
from  which  a  mask  is  suspended ;  the  other,  a  necklace  and  bracelets  of  pearls,  and 
sandals.  The  first  holds  a  palette  in  her  right  hand,  while  with  her  left  she  supports  a 
canvas  painted  with  figures  in  a  landscape.  The  second  holds  up  with  her  left  hand 
a  panel,  on  which  below  a  landscape  are  astronomical  signs.  Each  stands  on  a  mound 
with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  5j  in.,  5§  in.  respectively. 

174.  Masked  Man  dancing  with  a  woman  ;  copied  with  modifications  from  a  Meissen 

group  modelled  about  1740  by  Kaendler.  Mark,  a  small  anchor  in  red. 
About  1755.     (Plate  18.) 

The  man  wears  a  wide  plumed  hat,  parti-coloured  mask,  white  tunic  with  turquoise-blue 
sleeves,  pink  breeches,  and  blue  shoes ;  the  woman  has  her  hair  in  two  long  plaits,  and  is 
dressed  in  a  purple  bodice  laced  in  front,  white  apron,  yellow  skirt,  and  red  shoes.  The 
group  is  supported  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base,  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  7  in. 

Probably  from  tlie  same  model  as  the  "beautiful  group  of  figures  of  a  man  and  woman  dancing," 
which  appears  in  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  Chelsea  factory  for  March  31st,  1756.  A  "  p' 
of  Mascoraders  '  occurs  in  the  list  of  figures  enamelled  by  William  Duesbury  in  i75i-3. 

liought  in  Paris  on  February  20,  1878,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  112,  "Through  the  intervention  of 
Wanitz,  we  became  possessed,  of  a  lovely  Chelsea  group  of  Waltzers,  which  we  had  sefn 
at  Caillot's  in  the  morning."  Compare  also  Berling,  .\/msiie>-  Porsellan.  fig.  86 ;  Fischer, 
Sammlung Alt-Meissner Porzellan,  pi.  ii.,  No.  952  ;  Bemrose,  Botv,Chelsea  and De) by  Porcelain, 
p.  17. 

175.  Flower-holder,  in  the  form  of  two  bovs  struggling  with  a   fish.       .About   1755. 

(Pl.\te  18.) 

Two  boys  with  pink  drapery  partly  thrown  over  them  struggling  with  a  large  fish.    Tlie  group 

is  supported  on  a  rocky  base  on  which  are  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  SJ  in. 
"  A  fine  white  group  of  boys  and  fish  "  was  sold  ns  part  of  the  stock  of  Mr.  Thomas  Turner, 
•'Chinaman,'  at  Christie's,  in  1767;  see  Nightingale,  p.  xxxviii. 

C  2 


36 


CHELSEA. 


176.  Pair  of  Statuettes,  known  as  the  "  Ranelagh  figures";   a  young  man  holding 

in  liis  left  hand  a  letter  inscribed  "  Domince  Liicreticv,"  and  a  lady  with  a 
miniature  of  a  gentleman  suspended  by  a  ribbon  from  her  shoulder.  About 
1760.     (Plate  21.) 

The  man  wears  a  plumed  cocked  hat,  yellow-lined  green  cloak  over  a  flowered  doublet, 
white  breeches  and  yellow  shoes,  and  stands  against  a  pedestal  between  two  tree- 
stumps,  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base.  His  companion  is  dressed  in  a  fur-lined  green  cloak 
falling  loosely  from  her  shoulders,  a  crimson  bodice  and  yellow  shoes,  and  is  supported 
by  a  tree-stump ;  she  holds  a  bunch  of  flowers  in  her  right  hand.  Both  figures  are 
supported  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base.  H.  iif  in.,  I2|  in.  respectively. 
Bought  at  Antwerp  on  November  gth,  1881,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  371,  "  To  our  surprise  found 
at  Van  Herck's  a  grand  pair  of  Chelsea  figures  (Ranelagh  model)  for  which  they  asked  a 
moderate  price,  so  we  bought  them." 

177.  Pair  of  Figures.     A  man  and    woman  dancing    a  minuet.     Copied  from  figures 

in  a  painting  by  .\ntoine  Watteau,  now  in  the  National  Gallery  of  Scot- 
land at  Edinburgh,  of  which  an  engraving  by  Laurent  Cars  under  the  title 
"Fetes  Venitiennes"  accompanies  the  Collection,  No.  1816.  About  1760. 
(Plate  22.) 

The  man  wears  a  plumed  purple  cap,  a  crimson-lined  turquoise-blue  sleeved  robe,  flowered 
waistcoat,  breeches  decorated  with  coloured  discs,  and  red  shoes.  The  woman  is 
dressed  in  a  crimson-lined  greenish-blue  cloak  hanging  loosely  from  her  shoulders,  yellow 
bodice  with  flowered  panel  in  the  front,  flowered  skirt  which  she  holds  out  with  both 
hands,  and  red  shoes.  Both  figures  are  supported  on  rococo-scrolled  bases,  that  of  the 
woman  being  painted  with  a  spray  of  flowers.  The  man  is  supported  by  a  tree-stump. 
H.   11 J  in.,   io|  in.  respectively. 

The  subject  of  these  figures  was  a  favourite  one  for  the  decoration  of  Battersea  enamels  ; 
compare  Nos.  1444,  1445,  and  1538  in  the  Schreiber  Collection. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  pi.  i..  Porcelain,  pi.  xxxvii.  ;  Dillon,  Porcelain,  1904,  pi.  xliv.  ; 
Porcelain,  igio,  fig.  268. 

178.  Group.     A  youth  playing  a  hurdy-gurdy,  while  a  girl  is  teaching  a  dog,  dressed 

as  Harlequin,  to  dance  on  a  pedestal.  Adapted  from  a  composition  by  Carle 
Vanloo.     About  1765.     (Plate  22.) 

The  youth  is  dressed   in   a   wide   black    hat,    pink-sleeved   flowered   cont   and    breeches ;    the 

girl,  who    is    half   sitting    on  the  branch  of  a  flowering  tree,  wears  plumes  in  her  hair,  a 

yellow  cloak,  and  pink-lined  greenish-blue  dress  caught  up  to  show  a  flowered  petticoat. 

The    group   is   supported  on   a   rococo-scrolled   base   with    applied   flowers   and  foliage. 

H.  11  in. 
Compare  Peintiire  Decorative  ati  xviii'  Siecle,  i"  Serie,  pi.    29.     It  is  asserted  by  Charles  Welch 

in  the  Victoria  History   of   Middlesex  (vol.  ii.,  p.  154)    that    this  group  is  from  a  model 

by  Roubiliac. 

[179,  180.  Figures,  Chelsea- Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  66.] 
[I8I.  Group,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  12.] 
182.  Justice.     About  1765.     (Plate  21.) 

A  female  figure  standing  with  closed  eyes,  holding  in  one  hand  a  sword-hilt  (the  blade  being 
broken  off)  ;  the  other  hand  is  stretched  out  to  hold  a  pair  of  metal  scales,  also  missing. 
She  wears  a  flowered  robe  with  a  pink-lined  greenish-blue  cloak  thrown  over  it  and  is 
supported  on  a  rococo-scrolled  pedestal.     H.   io|  in. 

Bought  at  Brussels  on  March  8th,  1874,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  248,  "  We  strolled  into  Stroobanfs 
shop  on  the  Boulevard  d'.\nvers  .  .'  .  .  He  showed  us  a  very  fine  Chelsea  figure 
of  Justice,  15  inches  high,  and  quite  perfect  ....  We  possessed  for  £"12  los.  what 
he  began  by  asking  us  £20  for." 


CHELSEA.  37 

183.  Boy    with    a    basket   of   grapes,  perhaps    emblematic  of  Autumn.       About   1760. 

(Plate  18.) 

He  is  seated  on  a  stump,  nude,  except  for  loose  green  and  yellow  drapery  thrown  over  th« 
left  shoulder.  He  has  a  wreath  of  grapes  on  his  head  and  a  bunch  in  either  hand, 
others  lie  at  his  feet.     H.  6|  in. 

184.  Child  with  a  camel   crouching  at    her  feet,    emblematic  of   Asia.     About  1760. 

(Plate  19.) 

She  stands  with  a  flaming  vase  in  one  hand  and  a  bunch  of  grapes  in  the  other  ;  she  i.-; 
wrapped  in  coloured  drapery  and  has  a  wreath  of  apples  on  her  head.  The  group  is 
supported  on  a  mound  covered  with  applied  flowers  and  foHage.     H.  9I  in. 

185.  D.wiD    G.\RRicK  (b.   1717,    d.   1799)  in    the   character    of    Tancred,  in  Thomson's 

Taucred  and  Sigismunda.     .A.bout  1760.     (Pl.\te  19.) 

He  wears  a  fur  shako,  green  fur-lined  dolman,  purple  tunic,  flowered  breeches  and  red  boots, 
and  stands  against  a  tree-trunk  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  on  which  are  applied  flowers 
and  foliage.  H.  8}  in. 
Garrick  first  appeared  as  Tancred  in  1744-5.  .\  print  of  later  date  (1778)  from  Bell's 
British  Theatre,  representing  him  in  this  character,  but  differently  attired,  accompanies 
the  Collection  (No.  1817).  Other  examples  of  this  and  the  following  figure  are  illustrated 
by  Mrs.  Hodgson,  pi.  10. 

186.  Mrs.  CiBBER  (b.   1714,  d.   1766)  in  the  character  of   a    Vivandiere.      About    1760. 

(Plate  19.) 

She  stands  holding  a  basket  of  bottles  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  \vith  applied  flowers  and  foliage, 

and  wears  a  white  handkerchief  tied  over  her  head,  a  pink  jacket  over  a  red  bodice,  flowered 

skirt  and  pink  shoes.     H.  8|  in. 
Compare  note  on  Xo.   i8j. 

187.  Pair   of   Sweetmeat-stands    in    the    form    of    figures   of    a    negro   and   negress 

holding  shells,     .\bout  1760.     (Plate  19.) 

The  man  wears  a  figured  tunic  and  pink  breeches,  the  woman  a  turquoise-blue  bodice  and 
pink-lined  figured  skirt ;  both  figures  are  kneeling  on  one  knee,  and  supporting  with  the 
other  a  shell,  which  is  painted  inside  with  insects.  Both  rest  on  rococo-scrolled  bases. 
Each,  H.  7f  in.' 

[188.  Figure,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  12.] 

[189.  Figure,  Longton  Hall  porcelain,  see  p.  121.] 

190.  Pair  of  Figures.     Mars  and  Bellona.     About  1760.     (Plate  19. J 

Mars  is  clad  in  a  cuirass  with  gilt  scales  over  a  turquoise-blue  tunic,  a  white  cloak  hanging 
from  his  shoulders,  a  purple  helmet  with  white  plume,  and  buskins ;  he  stands  holding  a 
sword  in  his  left  hand,  with  a  purple  standard,  a  shield,  drum  and  cannon-ball  at  his  feet, 
Bellona  is  similarly  armed  with  a  purple  helmet  with  red  and  white  plumes  and  a  gilt- 
scaled  cuirass  over  a  purple  tunic  ;  she  wears  also  a  turquoise-blue  cloak  hanging  loosely 
from  her  left  shoulder,  and  a  flowered  skirt.  She  stands  supported  by  a  shield  moulded  with 
Medusa's  head.     Both  figures  rest  on  rococo-scrolled  bases.     H.  14  in.,  13I  in.  respectively. 

191.  Reaper,  perhaps  emblematic  of  Summer,     .\bout  1760.     (Plate  23.) 

He  stands  bare-legged,  with  a  sickle  in  one  hand,  in  the  act  of  lifting  a  sheaf,  on  a  rococo- 
scrolled  base.  Behind  him  is  growing  corn  ;  at  his  feet,  among  flowers  and  corn,  are  a  flail 
and  a  small  barrel-shaped  flask.  He  wears  a  black  hat  with  two  ears  of  corn  stuck  in  it,  a 
loose  white  shirt  and  red  breeches.     H.   lal   in. 

A  similar  figure  in  the  British  Museum  is  marked  with  an  anchor  in  gold  ;  $ee  Hobson,  Ca/.i/.i^Mc, 
p.  37,  No.  44,  pi.  12. 


3S 


CHELSEA. 


192.  CiROUP,  known  as  the  "Music  Lesson,"  forming  with  the  two  following  pieces  a 

"garniture  de  cheminee"  or  set.  A  siiepherd  boy  teaching  a  shepherdess  to  play 
the  llute,  modelled  by  Louis  Francis  Roubiliac  (b.  1695,  d.  1762),  with 
alterations,  nfter  a  painting  by  Francois  Bouclicr,  entitled  "  LWgrcublc  Lefon,"  of 
which  an  engraving  by  J.  F,.  Nilson  accompanies  the  Collection,  No.  1818. 
Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold,  and  "  R,"  the  mark  of  the  modeller,  impressed.  About 
1765.     (I^LATE  24.) 

The  figures  are  seated  on  a  mound  in  front  of  a  bocage  consisting  of  a  flowering  hawthorn.  The 
boy  wears  a  wide  blue  hat  with  a  spray  of  hawthorn  in  it,  a  richly  patterned  coat  and 
breeches,  and  red  shoes  ;  by  his  side  is  a  dog.  The  shepherdess  is  dressed  in  a  blue  bodice, 
flowered  skirt  and  petticoat,  and  green  shoes  ;  on  her  lap  is  a  lamb.  With  her  left  hand, 
which  is  passed  through  the  handle  of  a  basket  of  flowers,  she  holds  a  ribbon  attached  to 
the  neck  of  one  of  two  lambs  which  lie  at  her  feet.  The  whole  group  is  supported  on  a  gilt 
rococo-scrolled  base  decorated  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.   16  in.,  W.  11   in. 

In  the  Catalogue  of  the  last  sale  of  Chelsea  porcelain  held  by  order  of  Sprimont  on 
February  15th,  1770,  Lot  41,  is  "A  very  large  and  curious  group  of  a  shepherd  teaching  a 
shepherdess  to  play  the  flute,  £8  ;  see  Nightingale,  Contributions,  p.  6. 

Church,  fig.  10;  Benirose,  Bnu\  Chelsea  and  Derby  Porcelain,  pi.  v.  Compare- also  Michel, 
Fran(ois  Boucher,  Catalogue,  No.   1376. 

193.  Pair   of   Groups,    of  two  figures  each,  emblematic   respectively  of   Winter  and 

Spring,  and  Summer  and  Autumn,  forming  with  the  preceding  group  a  garniture 
de  cheminee  or  set.  Mark  on  each,  an  anchor  in  gold,  and  "R"  (No.  23J 
impressed,  the  mark  of  the  modeller  Louis  Francis  Roubiliac  (b.  1695,  d.  1762). 
About  1765.     (Plate  25.) 

The  first  group  is  composed  of  a  man  skating  and  a  woman  carrying  flowers  in  her  apron,  with 
a  holly-bush  behind  them.  The  man  wears  a  green  fur-lined  cap,  a  purple  coat,  also  lined 
with  fur,  over  a  richly  figured  tunic,  breeches  and  high  boots.  The  woman,  dressed  in  a 
short-sleeved  green  bodice,  white  apron,  flowered  skirt  and  blue  shoes,  holds  a  bouquet  in  her 
left  hand.  '1  he  companion  group  consists  of  a  woman  holding  a  sickle,  with  corn  and  two 
birds  at  her  feet,  and  a  gardener  carrying  fruit  in  his  apron,  standing  in  front  of  an  applc-lree. 
The  woman  has  flowers  in  her  hair  and  a  wide  blue  hat  hanging  round  her  neck,  and  wears 
a  red  bodice  and  a  blue-lined  skirt  with  gilt  flowers,  caught  up  so  as  to  show  a  richly 
figured  petticoat.  The  gardener  is  attired  in  a  crimson  coat  with  gilt  flowers,  red  breeches 
and  blue  apron,  and  holds  a  green  hat  in  his  left  hand.  Both  groups  rest  on  gilt  rococo- 
scrolled  bases  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.   14  in.,   I2|  in.  respectively. 

The  figure  of  Autumn  may  be  compared  with  a  Bow  figure  in  the  Collection  (No.  23),  which 
appears  to  be  adapted  from  it. 

194.  Pair  of  Figures,     a   shepherd   and   shepherdess.     Mark   on    each,    an  anchor  in 

gold.     About  1765.      (Plate  31.) 

Both  figures  stand  beside  flowering  tree-stumps  on  rococo-scrolled  bases  decorated  with  applied 
flowers  and  foliage.  The  shepherd  has  a  dog,  the  shepherdess  a  lamb  at  her  side.  The 
former  holds  flowers  in  his  hands  and  wears  a  wide-brimmed  black  hat,  turquoise  blue 
coat  with  a  pink-lined  yellow  cloak  thrown  over  it  and  a  wallet  slung  across  his  left 
shoulder,  a  white  shirt,  red  breeches  with  sheepskin  round  the  waist,  and  black  shoes. 
The  shepherdess  has  a  rose  in  her  right  hand  and  a  basket  of  flowers  under  her  left  arm. 
She  is  dressed  in  a  hat  w'ith  feathers,  loose  red  drapery  o\-er  her  left  shoulder,  a  crimson 
bodice,  white  apron  and  turquoise-blue  skirt  caught  up  by  her  right  hand  so  as  to  display 
a  flowered  petticoat,  and  red  shoes.  H.  12-,  in.,  I2j  in.  respectively-. 
Chaffers,  fig.  jor  ;  Gibb  and  Rackham,  pi.  22. 

195.  Pair  of  Terminal  Busts,  emblematic  of  Winter  and  Spring;  adapted  from  Meissen 

models.     Mark  on  "Winter,"  an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1760.     (Plate  33.) 

Winter  i.->  personified  by  a  bearded  man  in  a  fur-lined  crimson  cloak.  Spring  by  a  young 
woman  with  draperv  and  flowers  thrown  over  her  shoulder  and  a  wreath  on  her  head. 
Both  pedestals  are  of  square  section  with  moulded  plinth  :  that  of  "  Winter"  has  a  bunch  of 
hoUv-berries  and  leaves  on  the  front.     Each,  H.  5J  in. 


CHELSEA.  39 

196.  Actor    in    pseudo-Turkish    Costume.        Mark,    an    anchor    in    gold    (No.    22). 
About  1765.     (Plate  26.) 

He  wears  a  turquoise-blue  turban,  a  parti-coloured  masU,  yellow  coat  with  ermine  lining  over 
a  pink  tunic  decorated  with  peacock's  feather  pattern,  greenish-blue  breeches  and  red 
buskins.  He  stands  beside  the  stump  of  a  (lowering  tree  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  on 
which  are  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  I2f  in. 

[197,   198.  Group  .vnd  Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  sec  p.   12.J 

199.  Huss.\R.     About  1765.     (Plate  33.) 

The  figure  stands  supported  by  a  tree-stump  on  a  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.  He 
holds  a  sword  in  his  right  hand  and  wears  a  fur  shako,  purple  tunic,  fur-lined  red  dolman, 
flowered  breeches  and  high  red  boots.     H.  4-3  in. 

In  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  Chelsea  Factory  for  February  i6th,  1770,  Lot  i  is  "  Two  small  pots 
to  mount,  and  a  small  Hussar  7s."  ;   see  Nightingale,  Cmtribulion^,  p.  7. 

200.  General,    afterwards    Field-Marshal,    Conway    (b.     1721,    d.     1795),    cousin    of 

Horace  Walpole.  Ai  his  feet  is  a  cupid  supporting  a  shield  with  the  crest 
of  his  family,  a  Moor's  head.  About  1765.  Made  with  the  companion  statuette 
of  John  Wilkes  to  commemorate  the  popular  agitation  in  favour  of  Wilkes 
in  1763,  and  the  dismissal  from  his  command  and  his  post  in  the  royal  bed- 
chamber in  1764  of  General  Conway  for  speaking  in  Parliament  against  the 
Government  on  questions  involved  in  Wilkes's  case.    (Plate  21.) 

The  general  stands  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  in  semi-military  costume,  with  a  biiton  in  his 
right  hand  and  his  left  hand  resting  on  a  cannon,  behind  which  are  two'pink  standards. 
H.  \2l  in. 

Chaffers,  fig.  500  ;  Gamier,  Hisioire  de  la  Ceramique,  fig.   157. 

201.  John    Wilkes    (b.     1727,    d.    1797),    standing    beside   a    pedestal    inscribed   "  In° 

Wilkes,  Esq',"  on  which  are  scrolls  with  the  words  "Magna  Ciiar^"^"  and 
"  Bill  of  Rights."  At  his  feet  is  a  cupid  with  a  cap  of  liberty  and  a  volume 
entitled  "  lock  on  gov.t."     About  1765.     Companion  to  No.  200.     (Plate  21.) 

Wilkes  stands  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  with  a  pink  mantle  thrown  over  his   left   shoulder,   his 
left   hand  on  his  hip,  his  right  holding  a  pen    and  resting   on  the  pedestal.     H.   ii|   in. 
See  note  on  No.  200. 
Chaffers,  fig.  499. 

202.  LiiRD  Chatham  (b.  1708,  d.    1778)  resting  his  right  arm  on   a  pedestal   inscribed 

"Viscount  Pitt  of  Burton  Pyxsent,  Earl  of  Chat'"  Lord  Keeper  of  his 
Majesty^  Privy  Seal  "  ;  at  his  side  are  a  kneeling  Indian  woman  and  an 
alligator,  emblematic  of  America.  Mark,  {in  anchor  in  gold.  About  1766. 
(Plate  27.) 

Lord  Chatham  wears  a  court  dress  of  white  and  gold  and  a  purple  cloak.  The  Indian,  whose 
skin  is  painted  black,  wears  flowered  drapery  and  a  feather  head-dress  and  carries  a  quiver ; 
at  her  side  is  a  palm.  On  the  pedestal  and  at  its  foot  are  books  ;  one  corner  of  it  is  adorned 
with  a  lion's  head  and  two  paws.  The  group  is  supported  on  a  shaped  base.  H.  14I  in,, 
\V.  of  base,  11  i  in. 

Lord  Chatham  was  raised  to  the  Peerage  and  became  Lord  Keeper  in  1776,  and  in  the  .same 
year  declared  himself  in  favour  of  a  conciliatory  policy  towards  the  American  Colonics. 

Cluircli,  fig.   II  ;  Joiiynals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  454. 

1 203.   Group    Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  67.] 


40  CHELSEA. 


204.  James    Quin    (b.    1693,    ^-  ^7^(>)    in    the    character    of    FalsUiff.      About    1765. 
(Plate  21.) 

Standing    figure    dressed    in   a  plumed    pink    hat,    pink   coat,    over    a    flowered  doublet,  green 
breeches  and  top  boots.     In  the  right  hand  is  a  sword  (the  blade  of  which   is  missing),  and 
on  the  left  arm  a  shield  ;  a  paper  sticking  out  of  a  pocket  in  the  doublet  is  inscribed — 

s.    d. 
"  A  Capon     -  -  -  -  -  -20 

Sauce  -  -  -  -  -  -40 

Sack  -  -  -  -  -  -50 


The  figure  is  supported  by  a  tree-stump  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  with  applied  flowers 
and  foliage.  H.  13  in. 
"A  large  figure  of  Falstaft  i6s."  occurs  in  the  Catalogue  of  Chelsea  porcelain  sold  by 
Messrs.  Christie  and  Ansell  on  May  5th,  1779  ;  see  Nightingale,  Contributions,  p.  55.  This 
figure  is  a  modification,  with  addition  of  a  beard,  of  an  early  Bow  model  (exemplified 
by  N'o.   136  in  this  collection),  based  upon  an  engraving  by  James  Mc.Ardell. 

[205.   Figure,  Chelsea- Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  66.] 

^  4.     FIGURES  OF  ANIMALS  AND  BIRDS,  COLOURED. 
Nos.  206-235. 

These  figures  are  all  painted  in  colours  after  nature  ;  gilding  is  not 
used  in  their  decoration.  All  belong  to  the  earlier  periods  of  ihe  factory, 
before  1760. 

206.  Group  of  two  Kids.      Mark,   an  anchor  in  relief  painted  in  red  on  an  applied 

oval  medallion.     About   1755. 

Two  kids  lying  down,  on  an  oval  base  painted  with  flowers  and    foliage.      H.   2^    in.,  L.  of 
base,  4J  in. 

207.  Pair  of  Figures,  a  goat,  and  a  she-goat  with  her  kid.     About  1755.     (Plate  i8.) 

Both  figures  stand  on  oval  bases  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  5J  in.,  4J  in.  respectively  : 
each,  L.  of  base,  4J  in. 

208.  Lamb  lying  down.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  red.     About  1760.     (Plate  18.) 

H.   I   in.,  L.  2I   in. 

209.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Pug-dogs.     About  1755.     (Plate  33.) 

Each  has  a  red  collar  with  bells  and   is  sitting   up   on    an   oblong   base.      H.  3V  in.,  3}  in. 

respectively. 
Bought  at  Rotterdam,  on  August    24th,   1869,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  35,  "Went  to  \'an   Minden's 

and  made  several  purchases  .  .  .  ,  to  wit,  two  Chelsea  pugs,  £1  .  .  ." 

210.  Bird.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  painted  in  red  on  an  applied  oval  medallion. 

About  1755. 

Perched  on  the  stump  of  a    tree  with  flowers  and  leaves.      The    head,    back    and    wings   are 

black  with  red  spots,  the  breast  white.     H.  4I  in. 
Chaffers,  fig.  502 ;  Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  24. 


CHELSEA.  41 

211.  Bird.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  painted  in  red  on  an   applied   oval    medallion. 

About  1755.     (Plate  18.) 

A  crested  bird  with  a  King  tail  perched  on  the  stump  of   a  tree  with  small  fruit  and  leaves. 
H.  81   in. 

212.  Female    Hen-harrier.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  painted  in  red  on  an  applied 

oval  medallion.     About  1755.     (Plate  28.) 

Perched  on  the  stump  of  a  tree  with  leaves  and  flowers.     H.  6f  in. 
Mrs.  Hodgson,  pi.  8. 

213.  Bird  (warbler?).     Mark,  an  anchor    in  relief   painted  in  red  on  an  applied  oval 

medallion.     About    1755. 

Perched  with  wings  partly  outspread  on  the  stump  of  a  tree.     H.  jf  in. 

214.  Pair    of    Figures    of    Geese.     Mark,  an    anchor    in  relief   painted   in  red  on  an 

applied  oval  inedallion.     About  1755.     (Plate  28.) 

Each  supported  on  a  circular  base  on  which   are  flowers  and  foliage.     Each,  H.  5J  in. 

215.  Pair   of    Figures    of    Cock-ptarmigans.     Mark    on    each,   an    anchor    in    relief 

painted  in  red  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About   1755. 

Each  stands  among  com  and  flowers  on  a  round  base.     H.  j|  in.,  6  in.  respectively. 

216.  Crested  Bird.     Mark,  an   anchor  in  relief   painted    in  red   on   an  applied   oval 

medallion.     About  1755.     (Plate  28.) 

The  bird   has  a  brown  back,  head   and  tail,  yellow  breast  and  reddish  crest,  and   is   perched 

on  a  tree  stump  with  leaves.     H.  6J  in. 
Mrs.  Hodgson,  pi.  8. 

217.  Pair  of  Figures  of  aquatic  Birds.     Mark  on  each,  an  anchor  in  relief   on  an 

applied  oval  medallion.     About  1755. 

Each  stands  on  the  stump  of  a  tree  pluming  itself.     Each,  H.  42  in. 

218.  Bird  (greenfinch  ?).     Mark,  an  anchor  in  red.     About   1760.     (Plate  18.) 

Perched  on  the  stump  of  a  cherry-tree  with  fruit  and  leaves.     H.  8|  in. 

219.  Pair  of  Figures,  a  cock   and    hen.     Mark  on  each,  an   anchor    in  red  (No.  21). 

About  1760.     (Plate  18.) 

H.  6|  in.,  5I  in.  respectively. 

In    the  sale  catalogue  of  the  Chelsea    factory   for  April  12th,  1756,   No.  22    is:    ".4    Bantam 

cock  and  hen,"  see  Head,  Chelsea  Porcelain,  p.  41. 
Chaffers,  fig.   502  ;  Journals,  ii.,   illustration  facing  p.   24.     Exhibited  in  the  Loan  Exhibition 

at    the   Salisbun,'   and    South    Wilts   Museum,    Salisbury,   in    1872  ;    see   Read,    Porcelain 

Statuettes,  p.  6. 

220.  Group  of  two  Partridges.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  red.     About  1755. 

One  stands  with  outspread  wings  among  foliage  on  a  rock  beside  which  the  other  is  sitting. 
H.  .]„  in.,  \V.  j  in. 

221.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Barn  Owls.      About  1755. 

Each  perched   on  the   siunip  of    a  tree  with    leaves  and    berries  supported    on  an   eiglitsided 
base.     Modelled  with  only  three  claws  on  each  foot.     Each,  H.  8^  in. 


42 


CHELSEA. 


222.  Griien  Parrot.     About   1755. 

I'erdicd  on  the  slump  of  a  tree  with  flowers  ;iiid  leaves.     H.  4^   in. 

223.  Paiij  or  Figures  oe  Parrots.     About  1760. 

Kach  perched  on  the  stump  of  an  apple. tree  with  fruit  and  leaves,  rising  from  a  scrolled  base. 
.\  butterfly  is  painted  on  the  front  of  the  stump.     Each,  H.  8g  in. 

224.  Pair  of  Imgures  of  Tawny  Owls,     .'\bout   1760. 

Perched   on   a   stump   on  which  are  applied   flowers   and    leaves,  and  also   sprays  of    flowers 
painted  in  purple.     H.  y}  in.,  7I  in.  respectively. 

225.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Scops  Owls,  on  detached  pedestals.     About  1760. 

Each  is  perched  with  a  smaller  bird  grasped  in  its  claws.     The  pedestals  have  both  a  shaped  front 

and  sides,  and  are  decorated  with  scrollwork  in  relief  and  small  panels  painted  in  colours 

with  landscapes.     Each,  H.  6J  in.,  W.  of  pedestal,  3y  in. 
Chaffers,  fig.  502;  Journals,    ii.,  illustration    facing  p.  24.     Exhibited    in  the  Loan  Exhibition 

at    the    Salisbury   and     South    Wilts    Museum,    Salisbury,   in    1S72 ;    see    Read,  Porcelain 

Statuettes,  p.  6. 

[226,  227.   Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  13.] 

228.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Doves.     About  1755. 

Standing  on  round  bases  among  ears  of  corn  and  flowers.     Each,  H.  25  in. 

229.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Goldfinches.     About  1755.     (Plate  18.) 

Each  perched  on  the  stump  of  a  tree  with  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  4J  in. 
Exhibited  at  Salisbury  in   1S72  ;  see  I?ead,  Porcelain  Statuettes,  p.   6. 

230.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Blue  Titmice.     About  1755.     (Plate  i8.) 

Each  perched  on  the  stump  of  a   flowering  tree.     H.  4I  in. 

[231.  Pair  of  Figures,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   13.] 

232.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Green  Woodpeckers.     About  1755. 

Each  perched  on  the  stump  of  a  tree  with  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  5  in. 

Chaffers,    fig.  502;    Journals,  ii.,    illustration    facing  p.    24.     Exhibited    at    Salisbury  in   1872; 
see  Read,  Porcelain  Statuettes,  p.  6. 

[233.  Figure,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   13.] 

234.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Canaries.     About  1760. 

Each  perched  on  the  stump  of  a  tree  with  flowers  and  leaves.     H.  25  in.,  W.  2|  in.  respectively. 

235.  Canary.     .About   1760. 

IVrclied  on  the  stump  of  a  tree  with  flowers  and  leaves  and  a  branch  which  forms  a  whistle. 
H.   2I  in. 


CHELSEA.  43 

§  5.     VASES  AND  ORNAMENTAL  PIECES,  COLOURED. 
No?:.    236-261. 

All  these  are  decorated  with  enamel  colours  and  gilding  except  the 
earlier  pieces  (Nos.  236,  245,  252,  259),  on  which  gilding  is  absent, 
a  pair  of  pedestals  (No.  248),  whicli  are  ornamented  with  gilding 
alone,  and  Nos.  241  and  250,  on  which  the  colour  is  under  the  glaze. 

236.  \'asf.,  of  Chinese   form.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  apphed  oval  medallion. 

About   1750. 

(.)void  body,  painted  willi  a  landscape  in  which  are  two  figures  on  a  wooden  bridge,  a 
castellated  tower,  and  in  the  background  a  town.  Long  narrow  neck,  from  which  spring  two 
ogres-head  loop  handles,  spreading  foot.     H.  5j   in.,  diam.  ig  in. 

Formerly  in  the  collection  of  Llewellynn  Jewitt  and  illustrated  in  his  work,  Certimic  Art  iii 
Great  Britain,  i.,  fig.  380. 

237.  ^'ASF.  .\Ni)  Cover,  decorated  in  imitation  of    Japanese    Kakiyemon    ware.     Mark 

inside  the  neck  and  cover,  an  anchor  in  red.     About  1755.     (Pl.\te  29.) 

Hexagonal,  with  slightly  convex  sides,  rounded  shoulder,  short,  nearly  vertical,  neck  and  low 
domed  cover  with  fiat  knob.  On  three  sides  is  a  phoenix  perched  on  a  flowering  tree  ;  the 
alternate  sides  are  painted  with  flowering  plants.  On  the  shoulder  and  on  tlie  cover  are 
three  similar  birds  with  outspread  wings  in  shaped  panels  reserved  on  a  ground  decorated 
with  red  lotus  and  chrysanthemum  flowers  and  foliated  scrollwork  in  blue.  H.  12J  in,, 
diam.  6f  in. 
A  Japanese  vase  identical  in  form  and  pattern  is  at  Hampton  Court  Palace. 
Dillon,  Porcelain,  1900,  fig.  266;  Ciibb  and  Kackhain,  pi.  23. 

238.  \'ase  and  Cover,    decorated  in  imitation  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon   ware.     .About 

1755- 

Hexagonal,  with  slightly  convex  sides,  rounded  shoulder,  short  vertical  neck  and  low  domed 
cover  with  flat  knob.  The  body,  shoulder  and  cover  are  each  divided  into  six  panels 
decorated  alternately  with  a  gilt  rosette  amid  white  foliated  spirals  reserved  on  a  red  ground 
and  with  a  floral  spray  or  a  fan  and  ribbons.  The  panels  on  the  body  and  shoulder  are 
counterchanged.     H.  lof  in.,  diam.  6J  in. 

42.   I^AtR    OE    Vases,  decorated    in    imitation    of   Japanese    Kakiyemon    ware.     About 
17.15- 

of  hexagonal  section,  with  ogee-curved  sides  and  short  neck.  The  sides  are  painted  with  two 
alternating  designs  of  flowering  plants,  with  a  phoenix  among  them  in  one.  On  the  neck 
are  floral  sprays.     H.  gj  in.,  gjf  in.,  diam.  4J  in.,  45  in.  respectively. 

Mew,  pi.  i. ;  Solon,  pi.  i. 

239.  I'air  OE  \'ases  and  Covers,     .\bout  1763.     (Plate  30.) 

Kach  has  an  ovoid  body  and  short  concave  neck  with  claret-coloured  ground  ;  the  body  is 
supported  by  three  white  caryatid  figures  ending  downwards  in  lions' paws,  which  rest  on 
a  moulded  circular  pedestal  painted  with  trophies  of  arms  en  grisaille.  Wreaths  of  flowers 
painted  in  colours  are  festooned  round  the  body  and  across  the  figures.  The  high  domed 
covers  are  decorated  with  gilt  pierced  rococo  scrolls  and  surmounted  by  a  bouquet  of 
flowers.     H.  loj  in.,  loj  in.,  diam.  4I  in.,  4I  in.  respectively. 

Chaffers,  fig.  503. 


44  CHELSEA. 

240.  YhSE.    About  1765.    (Plate  31.) 

Pear-shaped  body  with  wide  mouth,  spreading  foot.  On  the  body  are  groups  of  exotic  birds 
in  landscapes  in  three  panels  surrounded  by  rococo  scrolls  and  on  the  foot  are  single  birds 
in  similar  panels.  The  upper  part  is  decorated  with  perforated  scrollwork.  H.  6f  in., 
diam.  5J  in. 

241.  Set  ok  Three  Vases,  moulded  in  relief  and  decorated  with  gilding  on   a   dark 

mazarine-blue  ground.    About  1765.     (Plate  31.) 

Each  has  a  bulbous  body  moulded  with  vine-leaves,  grapes  and  branches,  and  further  decorated 
with  insects  in  gold  on  the  blue  ground  ;  short  narrow  neck  expanding  upwards  and 
moulded  with  a  border  of  pointed  leaves.  Two  scroll  handles  spring  from  tlie  shoulder  ; 
the  high  foot  has  a  foliated  border.  \  lizard  is  coiled  round  the  foot  of  the  smallest  of  the 
three  vases.     H.   I2j  in.,   iif  in.,   12J-  in.,  W.  7^   in.,  y}  in.,  7^  in.,  respectively. 

These  vases  are  probably  similar  to  the  "  Two  Vases  of  deep  blue,  embossed  with  gold  leaves, 
from  the  Chelsea  Manufactory,"  spoken  of  by  J.  T.  Smith  in  A  Book  jor  a  Rainy  Day  as 
among  the   treasures  of   Mr.  William  Esdaile's  collection  seen  by  him  at  Clapham  in   1829. 

Gibb  and  Rackham,  pi.  24. 

[242.  Pair  of  Vases,  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  72.] 

243.  Vase  and  Cover.     About  1755.     (Plate  36.) 

Depressed  globular  body,  painted  on  either  side  with  a  landscape,  with  two  grotesque  satyr's- 
mask  handles  ;  high  foot  decorated  with  insects.  The  cover  is  gadrooned  and  surmounted 
by  a  floral  spray,  between  the  leaves  of  which  are  insects ;  round  the  edge  is  a  gilt  border. 
H.  3f  in.,  W.  il  in. 

[244.  Soup-tureen,  sec  p.  55.] 

245.  Pedestal,  painted  in  colours  in  the  style  of  Meissen  porcelain.    Mark,  an  anchor  in 

relief  painted  in  red  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.    About   1755.     (Plate  36.) 

Of  quatrefoil  section  with  mouldings  round  the  top  and  base.  Painted  with  a  carnation  and 
other  detached  flowers  and  insects.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  2f  in. 

246.  Pair  of  Pedestals.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold  (No.  20).     About  1765. 

Nearly  circular  at  the  top,  with  three  rococo-scrolled  feet  slightly  decorated  in  purple,  pea-green 
and  gold.     Each,  H.  3}  in.,  W.  4;  in. 

247.  Pedestal.     About  1755. 

Flat  back,  bowed  front  and  sides  with  scrolled  feet  at  the  angles  decorated  with  pea-green 
foliage  and  gilt  lines.  On  the  front  is  a  landscape  in  a  medallion  ;  the  sides  are  painted 
with  insects.     H.  4  in.,  L.  8  in.,  W.  5I  in. 

Illustrated  in  The  Connoisseur,  igio,  vol.  xxvi.,  p.  226. 

248.  Pair  of  Pedestals,  with  gilt  decoration.     About  1770.     (Plate  38.) 

In  the  form  of  a  plinth  with  four  incurved  sides  on  which  are  four  griffins  with  scrolled 
extremities,  supporting  on  their  heads  a  tablet  of  the  same  form  as  the  plinth.  H.  2J  in., 
2f  in.,  W.  3j  in.,  3;  in.  respectively. 

These  pedestals  may  have  been  made  during  the  Chelsea-Derby  period ;  compare  with  the 
pedestals  of  the  groups  Nos.  411,  427. 

249.  Pastille-burner,    decorated    with    applied  may-blossoni    in    full    relief.      About 

1760. 

In  the  form  of  a  cone  closely  set  with  red  flowers  having  green  centres,  except  on  four  small 
spaces  near  the  top,  which  are  perforated.  The  top  is  surmounted  by  a  yellow  rose. 
H.  jj  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 


CHELSEA.  45 

250.  Staxd  for  a  Mirror,  decorated    with   gilding  on  a  dark  mazarine-blue  ground, 

with  engraved  white  metal  back.     About  1760.     (Plate  38.) 

In  the  form  of  a  fountain  resting  on  six  scrolled  feet,  decorated  with  sprays  of  flowers  in 
gold  in  shaped  dark  blue  panels  and  with  rococo  scrolls  and  rushes  in  relief,  gilt.  The 
front  is  pierced  with  a  half  rosette.  Over  the  top  is  thrown  a  white  drapery  with  gilt 
floral  spravs  and  tasselled  ends.  On  the  metal  door  at  the  back  are  applied  the  initials 
"J  M  "  in'monogram.  Three  rectangular  openings  for  drawers,  now  missing,  have  been  cut 
in  the  panelling  of  the  front.     H.  9  in.,  L.  12  in.,  W.  8|  in. 

251.  In-kstand,    with   covered    pen-tray,    taper-holder,    ink-pot    and    pounce-pot,    both 

with  covers.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     About   1765. 

The  stand  consists  of  a  shaped  platform  with  scrolled  edge,  at  the  back  of  which  is  the 
narrow  pen-tray.  In  front  are  three  circular  sockets,  to  the  middle  one  of  which  is  screwed 
the  taper-holder  in  the  form  of  a  column  decorated  with  gilt  insects  on  a  dark  mazarine- 
blue  ground  ;  the  other  two,  holding  the  pots,  are  painted  with  a  bouquet  in  colours. 
The  handle  of  the  cover  of  the  pen-tray  is  formed  by  a  figure  of  a  lamb  with  a  wreath 
round  its  neck,  coloured  after  nature  ;  the  remaining  surface  is  decorated  with  gilt  scrolls, 
insects  and  flowers  on  a  dark  blue  ground.  The  pots  are  cylindrical  with  domed  covers, 
each  with  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a  bud  ;  both  have  a  dark  blue  ground,  enriched  with 
gilt  decoration  and  broken  bv  two  shaped  panels  in  reserve,  which  are  painted  in  colours 
with  exotic  birds  among  bushes.  Inkstand,  H.  6  in.,  L.  SJ  in.,  W.  4!  in.  ;  each  pot,  H.  4  in., 
diam.  2  in. 

Probably  similar  to  the  "very  rich  and  curious  ink-stand,  with  a  fine  pompadour  ground, 
decorated  with  a  lamb,  and  richly  finish'd  with  burnish'd  gold  4/.  4s.,"  forming  lot  8  in 
the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  united'  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  .Vpril  i8th,  1771  ;  see 
Nightingale,  p.  26. 

252.  Pair  of  jARDixitRES.     About  1755. 

Xearlv  semi-circular  in  section  with  fluted  sides,  scalloped  rim  and  a  broad  striped  ribbon  in  relief 
round  the  middle.  The  front  is  painted  with  a  bouquet.  The  top  is  pierced  with  a 
semi-circular  orifice  and  smaller  holes  for  cut  flowers.  H.  3I  in.,  L.  7j  in.,  7^  in.,  W.  4f  in., 
4j  in.,  respectively. 

Bought  at  .Amsterdam  on  August  17th,  1869,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  33,  "  .^t  Ganz's  we  have 
found  two  excellent  Chelsea  jardinieres  painted  with  flowers,  which  he  sold  us  as  old 
Dresden,  for  £1  '15s." 

253.  A  Pair  of  Flower-pots  containing  bouquets  of  flowers  modelled  in   full   relief. 

About  1760.     (Plate  38.) 

The  outside  of  the  pots  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers.  Each,  H.  7  in.,  diam.  3  in. 
These  pieces  are  doubtfully  attributed  to  Chelsea. 

254.  Pair    of    Branch    Candelabra.     Part  of  the  service   given  by  George  III.   and 

Oueen   Charlotte   in  1763  to  the  brother  of  the  latter,  the  Duke  of  Mecklenburg- 

Strelitz. 

The  knob  surmounting  the  stem  from  which  the  branches  spring,  as  well  as  the  one  remaining 
nozzle  and  grease-pan,  is  decorated  with  bouquets  and  garlands  of  flowers  painted  in  colours, 
in  panels  bordered  by  gilt  rococo  scrolls  and  separated  by  dark  mazarinc-blue  bands  on  which 
arc  gilt  insects.  The  three  S-shaped  branches,  of  which  only  one  in  each  candelabrum  is 
entire, are  also  decorated  with  gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  lines  of  dark  blue.  Each,  H.  6 J  in., 
L.  of  unbroken  arm,  8  in. 
Each  of  the  candelabra  formerly  had  three  arms  of  equal  length  :  they  were  parted  with  because 
each  had  two  arms  damaged  by  the  steward  of  the  ducal  establishment  to  I.azarus.  a  dealer 
at  Hamburg,  from  whom  they  were  bought  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  in  1867.  The 
service  is  mentioned  bv  Horace  Walpole,  who  does  not  seem,  however,  to  have  appreciated 


46  CHELSEA. 

its  beauty  as  would  have  been  expected.  In  a  letter  to  Sir  Horace  Mann  (March  4th 
1763)  which  begins  with  some  particulars  about  the  King  of  Prussia  (Frederick  the 
CircMt)  he  ends  thus: — "I  saw  yesterday  a  magnificent  service  of  Chelsea  China,  which 
the  King  and  Oueen  are  sending  to  the  Duke  of  Mecklenburg.  There  are  dishes  and  plates 
without  number,  an  epergne,  candlesticks,  salt-sellers,  sauce-boats,  tea  and  coffee  equipages, 
in  short,  it  is  complete,  and  costs  twelve  hundred  pounds  !  I  cannot  boast  of  our  taste  ; 
the  forms  are  neither  new,  beautiful,  nor  various.  Yet  Sprimont,  the  manufacturer,  is  a 
I'Venchman.  It  seems  their  taste  will  not  bear  transplanting.  But  I  have  done  ;  my 
letter  has  tumbled  from  the  King  of  Prussia  to  a  set  of  china  ;  encore  passe,  if  I  had  begun 
with  the  King  of  Poland,  ce  Ruy  de  Fayence  as  the  other  called  him," — alluding  to  his 
porcelain   manufactory  at  Meissen. 

255.  r.-\.iR  OF  Candlesticks  with  detachable  nozzles.  In  the  front  are  groups  illus- 
trating two  of  Aesop's  fables,  the  respective  titles  of  which  are  inscribed  on  the 
bases,  "THE  COCK  AND  JEWEL,"  "THE  VAIN  JACKDAW."  About  1765 
(Plate  31.) 

In  the  first  candlestick,  the  cock  stands  in  the  middle  with  a  jewelled  necklace  before  him, 
accompanied  by  two  hens  with  four  chickens.  In  the  second,  the  jackdaw  is  represented 
being  pursued  by  a  peacock  which  is  plucking  feathers  from  his  tail,  while  another  peacock 
stands  behind.  The  groups  are  each  supported  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  with  three  feet. 
At  the  back  is  a  bocage  in  the  form  of  a  flowering  hawthorn  supporting  the  foliated  nozzle 
and  grease-pan  ;  other  flowers  are  intertwined  in  the  middle  of  the  bocage,  at  the  back  of 
which  is  a  loop  handle.     Each,  H.  lo}  in.,  W.  8j  in. 

In  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  Chelsea  factory  for  1770  are  several  lots  described  as  "a  pair  of 
fable  candlesticks,"  or  "a  pair  of  toilette  candlesticks, fable  pattern";  see  Nightingale,  p.  20. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  2  ;  Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  454. 

[256.  Candlesticks,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  2J.] 
257.  Haxd  Candlestick.     About  1765. 

Circular  tray  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers,  with  wavy  rim  decorated  with  gilt  foliated  scrolls 
on  a  dark  mazarine-blue  border.  The  socket  is  in  the  form  of  a  conventional  flower,  with 
green  twisted  stalk  forming  the   loop  handle.     H.   35:  in.,  diam.  5  in. 

[258.  Bottle,  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  72.] 

259.  Box    and  Cover  in    the  form  of  an  apple.     About   1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Coloured  after  nature.  On  the  top  is  a  looped  stalk  with  two  leaves  forming  a  handle.  H.  3  in., 
diam.  2|  in. 

Bought  at  Utrecht  on  November  4th,- 1872,  see  Jotirncds,  i.,  p.  fjo,  "  Gorkum  ....  was 
unluckily  from  home,  but  C.  S.  spied  out  among  his  miscellaneous  stock  a  very  fine  apple  of 
Chelsea  china  in  the  form  of  a  box  and  cover,  which  Mine,  (jorkumsold  to  us  for  2s.  6d." 

260.  Toilet-Box  and  Cover  containing  five   smaller  heart-shaped  boxes  with  covers, 

painted  en  camaieii  in  black  outline  washed  over  with  green. 

The  outer  box  is  of  scalloped  form  with  flat  cover  ;  it  is  painted  inside  on  the  bottom,  and 
both  inside  and  outside  the  cover,  with  mountainous  landscapes  in  which  are  castellated 
buildings  and  trees.  The  covers  of  the  smaller  boxes  are  decorated  outside  with  similar 
landscapes.     Large  box,  H.  2  in.,  diam.  jl  in.  ;  small  boxes,  H.  I5  in.,  diam.  2j  in. 

261.  Toilet- BOX  and  Cover,  painted  en  camaieu  in   black  outline  washed  over  with 

green  and  further  decorated  with  gilding.     About  1760. 

In  the  form  of  a  tan.  The  top  is  painted  with  a  view  of  a  country  house  among  trees  with  a 
cascade  in  the  foreground.  On  the  sides  are  village-scenes  with  cottages  and  trees.  H.  2  in., 
W.  Si  in. 


CHELSEA.  47 

§  6.     CHELSEA    TOYS. 

Nos.  262-327. 

Many  of  tliese  are  inscribed  with  gallant  mottoes  in  French  (often 
incorrectly  spelt).  Where  such  inscriptions  occur  they  are  invariably 
written  in  small  red  capitals. 

262-268.  Etuis,  all  mounted  in  gold  and  decorated  in  enamel  colours,  with  the 
e.xception  of  No.  264,  which  is  painted  in  underglaze  mazarine-blue  ;  all  of  them, 
except  Nos.  262  and  263,  are  also  gilt. 

262.  Etui  and  Scent-bottle  with  Stopper,  combined.     About  1755. 

Ill  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  child,  naked  except  for  a  frill  round  his  neck,  standing  anmng  vine- 
branches  and  supporting  with  outstretched  arms  a  basket  of  grapes  on  his  head.  A  buttertly 
forms  the  stopper.     Mounted  in  gold  at  the  centre  and  at  the  stopper.    H.  45  in.,  W.  J  in. 

263.  Etui  representing  Daphne  turning  into  a  laurel.     About   1755. 

She  is  liolding  up  her  arms  and  looking  backwards  over  her  right  shoulder.  Her  lower  limbs 
have  changed  into  the  trunk  of  the  tree  and  leaves  are  sprouting  from  her  head.  H.  jj  in., 
diam.  I  in. 

264.  Etui,  with  gilt  decoration  partly  over  a  mazarine-blue  ground.    About   1760. 

Cylindrical  in  form,  decorated  with  ornament  in  six  spiral  bands,  consisting  alternately  of  gilt 
diaper-pattern  on  a  white  ground  and  gilt  (lowers  on  a  blue  ground.     H.  4]  in.,  diam.  ^  in. 

Bought  at  the  Hague  on  October  26th,  1880,  see  Jourinih,  ii.,  p.  313.  "  The  Crown  Prince  and 
Princess  of  Denmark  were  at  Tennyssen's  when  we  got  tliere.  This  is  now  the  chief  shop 
at  the  Hague,  and  I  never  expected  to  find  in  it  a  lovely  Bleu  de  Roi  and  gold  Chelsea 
etui  and  to  be  asked  only  £^  for  it." 

265.  Etui,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  Cupid  kneeling  on  a  column  and  holding  a 

pair  of  doves.     About   1760. 
The  column,  forming -the  lower  part,  is  coloured  and  gilt  to  imitate  red  marble.     Cujiid  kneels 
on    his  left  knee  and  has  green   drapery  thrown   loosely  round  him  and   a  scarf  over  his 
right  shoulder  with  the  motto:  "IMITEZ   NOUS."     H,  5I  in.,  diam.  I  in. 

266.  Etui,  surmounted  by  a  bust  of  a  lady.     About  1765. 

The  upper  part  is  moulded  in  the  form  of  a  bust  of  a  lady  wearing  a  pink  h.it  with  blue 
riljbon  and  a  figured  mantle  over  a  pink  bodice  with  a  flower  stuck  into  it.  The 
cylindrical  lower  portion  is  painted  on  the  front  with  a  drawn  sword  pl.mtcd  in  the 
ground  between  branches  of  palm  and  laurel,  in  an  oval  medallion  bordered  bv  pink  riblions 
with  the  motto  "POUR  I/HO.NF.UR  KT  I.WMOUR."  The  remainder  is  decorated  with 
panels  of  gilt  scroll  work.     11.  4I  in.,  diam   :J  in. 

267.  Etui,  in  the  form  of  a  garlanded  heart  on  a  column,     .\bout  1760. 

Tlic  lower  part  is  painted  to  imitate  marble,  veined  with  crimson  and  gold  ;  upon  the  capital 
rests  a  heart  wreathed  in  flowers  applied  in  relief.  Heneath  the  base  of  the  column  is 
painted  a  heart  pierced  by  an  arrow,  encircled  bv  the  motto:  "Jl'.  CON'TR.MNT  I.K.S 
PLUS  H.\UT  (sic)."     H.  5A  in.,  diam.  i  ^\  in. 

268.  Etui,  surmounted  by  a  bird   in  a  cage.     About   1765. 

Of  cylindrical  form,  decor.ited  witli  small  circular,  gilt-bordered  medallions  enclosing  roses  and 
leaves  in  natural  colours.  The  plinth  at  the  top  on  which  the  cage  rests  is  inscribed  with 
the  motto:  "JK  VIS  KN  .\MITI  (sir)."     H.  4^  in.,  diam.  2  in. 


48 


CHELSEA. 


269-277.  BoNBONNiERES  AND  Patch-boxes,  painted   in  enamel  colours.     Nos.  270,  272, 
273  and  275  are  also  decorated  with  gilding. 

269.  HoNBoxNiERE,  with  lid  of  moss  agate  and  chased  gold  mount,      .\bout   755. 

(Plate  33.) 
In  the  form  of  an  oblong  box  with  four  slightly  convex  sides  on  which  are  painted  in  colours 
figures  in  Wattpau  dress  in  a  landscape  with  sheep  and  a  goat.     The  small  base  is  painted 
underneath  witli  a  spray  of  roses  en  cama'eu  in  crimson.     H.   i|  in.,   \V.   iJJ   in. 

270.  RoNBONNifeRE,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  Cupid  playing  on  a  pair  of  kettle- 

drums,   with    Dattersea    enamel    lid    and    gold    mount.       About    1760. 
(Plate  32.) 
Cupid  is  seated  on  a  mound  covered  with  flowers,  with  red  Howered  drapery  across  his  knees 
and  a  blue  fillet  in  his  hair.     A  ribbon  with  the  motto  "POUR  I.ES  C.A.V.\LIERS  DE 
CITHERE"  passes  over  his  right  shoulder.     The  kettle-drums  at  his  side  are  hung  w.;ith 
llowered  cloths.     The  inside  of  the  bonbonniere  and  the  enamel  lid,  both  inside  and  outside, 
are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  2j   in.,  W.  2|  in. 
Church,  fig.   I. 

271.  Bonbonniere,    in    the    form  of  a  figure  of    a  lady  caressing  a  spaniel,  with 

Battersea  enamel  lid  and  gilt  metal  mount.     About  1760.     (Plate  32.) 
The  lady  sits  on  a  mound  and  wears  a  white  cap  with  purple  ribbon  and  a  Watteau  dress 
embroidered  with  sprays  of  flowers.     The  enamel  lid  is  also  painted  inside  and  outside  with 
flowers.     H.  2j  in.,  W.   ij   in. 

272.  Bonbonniere,  in    the    form    of   an   oval    table-top    laid  in   readiness    for   a 

convivial  gathering,  with  gilt  metal  mount.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  33.) 

The  table  is  covered  with  a  flowered  cloth.  Upon  it  are  laid  a  basket  of  grapes  with  a  ribbon 
bearing  the  motto  "  [B.\]CCHUS  \'OUS  IN\'ITE,"  a  wine-fiask,  two  glasses,  a  packet  of 
tobacco  and  two  clay  pipes.  The  inside  of  the  bonbonniere  is  painted  with  sprigs  of 
flowers;   the  lid  is  missing.     H.   ij   in.,  W.   2|  in. 

273.  BoNBONNiHRE,  with  lid  of  Egyptian  jasper  mounted  in  silver.      .\bout   1760. 

Moulded  in  relief  with  a  hunting  horn,  wallet,  priming-flask,  knife,  flowered  cloak,  and  a  dead 
hare,  laid  on  a  flowery  mound  ;  the  strap  of  the  wallet  is  inscribed  with  the  motto  :  "  A 
[I.A]  CHAS[SE]  DES  BELLES."  The  inside  of  the  bonbonniere  is  painted  with  sprigs  of 
flowers.     H.  ij  in.,  L.  2|  in. 

Bought  at  Granada  in  1872,  sec /oKi-iia/s,  i.,  p.  251,  "  We  went  on  ....  to  Rotterdam  and 
walked  to  Van  Mlnden's  ....  with  him  we  got  ....  a  box  with  exactly  the 
same  subject  and  model  as  a  Chelsea  box  we  bought  at  Granada,  1872, '  Chasse  des  Belles."  " 
The  same  model  occurs  in  Battersea  enamel  (compare  No.  1559  in  the  Schreiber  Collection). 

274.  Bonbonniere,  in  the  form  of  a  rabbit  and  her  young,  with  lid  of  Battersea 

having  enamel  and  gilt  metal  mount.     About  1755.     (Plate  ^^.) 
The  rabbits  are  moulded  in  full  relief  and  coloured  after  nature.     The  enamel  lid  is  painted 
inside  and  outside  with  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  i|  in.,  L.  ij  in. 

275.  Patch-box,  in  the  form  of   a  basket  of  fruit,  with  lid  of    Battersea    enamel 

a  looking-glass  inside  and  gilt  metal  mount.     About  1760.     (Plate  33.) 

The  fruit  are  coloured  after  nature  ;  the  basket,  left  white,  is  tied  with  a  ribbon  bearing  the 
motto  :  "  L'AMOUR  LES  A  CUEILLI  (sic)  POUR  LA  PLUS  BELLE."  The  inside  of 
the  bonbonniere  and  the  outside  of  the  enamel  lid  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers. 
H.  li  in.,  L.  2  in. 


CHELSEA.  49 

276.  BoNBOxxifeRE,  in  the  form   of  a  man's  head,  with    lid    of    Battersea    enamel 

and  gilt  metal  mount,     .\bout   1760.     (Pl.\te  33.) 

The  man  has  a  slight  moustache  and  wears  a  soft  turquoise-blue  cap  with  red  and  crimson 
plumes  and  fur  border.  The  inside  of  the  bonbonniere  and  the  enamel  lid,  both  inside 
and  outside,  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  2|  in.,  W.  2'   in. 

Bought  at  Hamburg  on  October  13th,  1880,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  306  :  "  .\t  Sig.  Stern's,  in  Wex 
Strasse  ....  we  happened  to  ask  her  if  she  had  any  small  flacons,  on  which  she 
produced  several,  ....  among  them  a  bonbonniere,  formed  of  a  male  head,  and  of 
the  finest  Chelsea     ....     she  asked  a  moderate  sum,  which  we  most  cheerfully  gave." 

Church,  fig.  2. 

277.  P.\TCH-BOx,  in  the  form  of  a  lady's  face,  with  lid  of  Battersea  enamel  having 

a  looking-glass  inside  and  gilt  metal  mount.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  23-) 

The  lady  is  wearing  a  white  linen  cap  with  a  crimson  feather  on  the  front  and  a  yellow  bow  to 
fasten  it  under  the  chin.  The  enamel  lid  is  painted  with  sprays  c^f  (lowers.  H.  ij  in., 
L.  i|  in. 

278.   Figure  of  .v  Buy  with  a  basket,  painted   in  colours.     About   1735.     (Pl.vth  33. j 

A  naked  boy  crouching  beneath  an  empty  basket,  which  he  supports  with  both  hands  on  his 
shoulders ;  the  figure  rests  on  a  round  base,  concave  underneath,  painted  w'ith  sprays  of 
flowers.     H.  2J  in.,  W.  j   in. 

279  303.  ScENT-BOTTLES,  all  painted  in  enamel  colours,  \\  ith  the  exception  of  \os. 
279  and  301,  which  are  in  plain  white  porcelain.  The  later  ones  (Nos.  282. 
283,  284,  289,  291-5,  297,  300)  arc  also  decorated  with  gilding. 

279.  ScEXT-BOTTLE  .\ND  STOPPER,  of  plani  white  porcelain.     .Vbout   1755. 

In  the  form  of  a  pilgrim-bottle  with  oblong  base,  four-sided  neck,  and  on  the  shoulders  ranT-' 
heads  in  relief,  from  which  are  festooned  vine-stems  with  foliage.  The  stopper  is  in  the 
form  of  a  bunch  of  flowers.     H.  3 J  in.,  \V.  i\^  in. 

280.  ScEXT-BOTTLE,  copied  from  a  Meissen  model,  with  stopper  and  base    of  gilt 

metal,  the  latter  pierced  with  floral  ornament.     About   1753. 
Of   flattened   rococo  form  with   scrollwork   in   relief,  and    a   bouquet   of    flowers    painted    in 

colours  on  cither  side.     H.  3I  in.,  \V.  i|  in. 
Compare  Kunstsammlungen  F.  von  Parpart,  Berlin,  iyi2.  pi.  42,  no.  687. 

281.  ScENT-BOTTLE    AND    STOPPER,  with    a    mirror  attached  by  a  gold    mount  to 

the  base.     About  1755. 
Of  flattened   rococo  form  with   scrollwork    in    relief,   and   a    bouquet  of    flowers   painted    in 
colours  on  either  side.     The  stopper  is  in  the  form  of  a  butterfly.     H.  3  in.,  W.  ij  in. 

282.  Scent-bottle    axd   Stopper,  inscribed  "  luni  ile  Senteur,"  with  gold  mount. 

About  1735. 
In  the  shape  of  a  wine-flask  with  the  body  swathed  in  wickerwork  (coloured  yellow),  a  label 
bearing    the   name  round  the  shoulder,  and  bouquets  of   flowers    in   colours  on  the  long 
narrow  neck.     The  stopper  is  in  the  form  of  a  butterfly.     H.  3I  in.,  \V.  i\  in. 
.\    scent-bottle    identical,  in  form    and    bearing    the   same    inscription,  is  figured   in   Schercr, 
Fiirstcnberger  Porzellan  (fig.  104),  as  aspecinien  of  Fiirstenberg  porcelain,  and  may  be  a 
o.py  of  this  Chelsea  model. 
X     l;i2.-,;i  D 


50  CHELSEA. 

283.  Scent-bottle,    with    outer    screw    cap    and    inner    stopper.      .Vbout    1760. 

(Plate  33.) 
Vase-shaped,  with  flattened  sides  and  projecting  shoulder  moulded  with  rococo  scrollwork. 
On  either  side,  reserved  in  white  on  the  m;izarine-blue  ground,  are  shaped  panels  with 
gilt  borders  painted  in  colours  respectively,  with  a  boy  and  a  girl 'in  dress  of  the  period 
dancing  among  trees.  The  cap  is  surmounted  bv  a  bunch  of  flowers  applied  in  relief. 
II.  3f  in.,  W.  ij. 

284.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper.     About  1770. 

of  flattened  form  with  short  neck  and  small  stopper,  moulded  with  leafy  scroll-work  along 
the  narrow  edges,  and  with  a  flaming  heart  on  either  side,  in  slight  relief  on  a  bleu  de 
roi  ground.  The  hearts  are  outlined  in  gold  and  painted  each  with  a  bow  and  arrow 
and  the  motto:  "JE  TIRE  AU  CnaiR."     H.  3  in,,  W.  ij  in. 

This  piece  was  probably  made  during  the  Chelsea-Derby  period. 

285.  Scent-bottle    and    Stopper,   in    the    form    of    a    figure    of    a    Chinaman 

holding  a  bird,  with  gold  mounts.     About   1755.     (Plate  33.) 

Standing  figure,  clad  in  a  long  flow^ered  robe  with  yellow  lining,  and  a  yellovy  conical  hat. 
The  base  is  concave  underneath  and  is  painted  with  a  bouquet.     H.  4  in.,  W.  ifV  '"• 

285.  Scent-bottle    and    Stopper,  in    the    form   of    a    figure  of    a    lady  dancing, 
mounted  in  gold.     About  1755.     (Plate  32.) 
The  lady's  head,  adorned  with  a  plumed  cap,  forms  the  stopper.     She  wears  a  flowered  dress, 
the  "wide   skirts  of   which   she  holds  out  on   either   side.      She    is  supported   on   a   base 
concave  underneath  painted  with  a  bouquet.     H.  4  in.,  W.  2  in. 
Church,  lig.  3. 

287.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  parrot,  mounted  in 

gold.     About  1755. 

The  plumage  is  painted  in  red,  green,  brown  and  yellow  ;  the  head  forms  the  stopper.  The 
bird  stands  beside  a  tree-trunk  springing  from  a  mound,  which  is  concave  underneath 
and  painted  with  a  bouquet.     H.  2  in.,  W.  ij  in. 

288.  Double    Scent-bottle   with   two    Stoppers,  in   the   form   of  figures   of  a 

parrot  and  a  Cochin  China  cock,  mounted  in  gold.    About  1755.    (Pl.a.te  33.) 

The  plumage  of  the  parrot  is  green,  red  and  yellow  ;  that  of  the  cock,  black  and  white.  The 
heads  form  the  stoppers.  The  two  bird's  stand  on  a  base  concave  underneath,  painted 
with  a  bouquet.     H.  2f  in.,  W.   \l  in. 

289.  ScENT-BOTTLE    AND    STOPPER,    in    the    form  of    a    figure  of   a  peacock  on    a 

broken  column,  mounted  in  gilt  metal.     About  1755.     (Pl.ate  33.) 
The  plumage   is   painted  in  colours :    the  head  forms  the  stopper.      The  branches  of   a   rose 
with  flowers   and  foliage   cling    round    the  column,  which    rests   on    a   mound,  concave 
underneath,  painted  with  a  bouquet.     H.  3!  in.,  W.  ij  in. 

290.  Scent-bottle    and    Stopper,  in   the  form  of  a   figure  of   a   pug-dog,  with 

Battersea  enamel  collar  and  gilt  metal  mounts.     About  1755.     (Plate  33.) 

The  dog  sits  on  a  base,  concave  underneath,  painted  with  a  bouquet.     The  collar  is  inscribed 

with  the  motto  "  FIDELLE  "  in  gold.     The  head  forms  the  stopper.     H.  ij  in.,  W.  iJ  in. 

291.  ScENT-BOTTLE    AND    STOPPER,    moulded    to    represent    a    boy  catching    birds, 

with  metal  mount.     About  1765.     (Plate  33.) 

The  boy,  who  wears  a  wig,  embroidered  coat,  and  yellow  breeches,  is  peering  round  the  trunk 
of  a  flowering  tree  at  an  open  cage  hung  upon  it,  on  the  top  of  which  a  bird  is  perched. 
He  holds  another  cage  in  his  left  hand  ;  his  hat  lies  on  the  ground  behind  him.  .\  large 
flower  forms  the  stopper.  Underneath  the  bottom  is  the  mottii  "  JE  VIS  EX  ESPERAXCE  " 
surroimding  a  pierced  heart,  in  gold.     H.  3}  in.,  W.   rj   in. 


CHuLSEA.  51 

292.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper,  moulded  to  represent  Cupid  standing  beside  a 

rose-tree,  with  gold  mount.     About  1760.     (Plate  33.) 
Cupid  stands  with   bow  and  quiver  slung   over   iiis  shoulder,  holding  a  flower   to   his  nose. 
The  stopper  is  formed  of  a  bunch  of  flowers.     H.  3  in.,  W.  i|  in. 

293.  Scent-bottle   and   Stopper,  moulded  to  represent  a  bov  birdnesting,  with 

gold  mount.     About  1760.     (Plate  ^^.) 

The  boy  is  dressed  in  a  crimson  hat,  yellow  jacket  and  red  breeches.  He  stands  beside  a 
tree-trunk  carrying  a  nest  in  his  hands,  while  two  birds  are  flying  towards  him  ;  another 
bird  is  perched  on  the  stopper.  The  base  is  concave  underneath  and  decorated  with  a 
gilt  flower.     H.   2|  in.,  W.   i|  in. 

294.  Scent- bottle    and  Stopper,  in  the  form  of   a    figure    of  a    boy    dressed    as 

a  gardener,  mounted  in  gold.     About  1760.     (Plate  33.) 
He  wears  a  yellow  coat,   turquoise-blue   waistcoat,  blue   apron   and  crimson    breeches,   and 

carries  a  basket  of  flowers  on  his  head  and  another  containing  fruit  on  his  right   arm. 

.\  bunch  of  flowers  forms   the  stopper.     The  base  is  concave  underneath  and  decorated 

with  a  gilt  flower.     H.  3j  in.,  W.  J  in. 
This  model  was  imitated  in  enamel  at  Battersea  ;  compare  Xo.  1728  in  the  Schreiber  Collection. 
Bemrose,  Bum,  Chelsea  and  Derby  Porcelain,  illustration  on  p.  iii. 

295.  Scext-bottle  and  Stopper,  in  the  form  of  a  group  of  Cupid  and  a  woman 

beside  a  clock.  About  1760.  (Pl.\te  32.) 
.V  woman,  partially  clad  in  yellow  drapery,  advances  with  her  head  turned  to  look  at  the 
dial  of  a  tall  clock,  the  hand  of  which  points  to  12.  .At  her  feet  is  a  dog  and  at  the 
back  of  the  clock  a  rose-tree.  Cupid  stands  by  pointing  at  the  clock.  The  group  is 
supported  on  a  marbled  base  with  four  feet  and  the  inscription  :  "  I.'HEURE  DU  BERGER 
riDELLE."     A  pair  of  doves  form  the  stopper.     H.  3I  in.,  \V.  i|  in. 

296.  Scent-bottle  and   Stopper,  moulded   to   represent   two   boys  at  a    furnace 

distilling,  with  gilt  metal  mount.  About  1760.  (Pl.\.te  32.J 
Two  naked  boys  beside  a  furnace,  one  of  them  blowing  the  fire  with  bellows,  the  other 
kneeling  to  stir  a-  mortar ;  on  ledges  of  the  furnace,  which  is  ornamented  with  sprigs 
of  flowers,  are  an  alembic  and  other  vessels.  \  jet  of  flames  at  the  summit  forms 
the  stopper.  The  base  is  concave  underneath  and  decorated  with  a  flower  in  colours 
H.  3^  in.,  W.  1}  in. 

297.  Scent- BOTTLE  and  Stopper,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  woman  holding  a 

basket  of  grapes,  with  gilt  metal  mount  and  chain  to  the  stopper. 
About  1760.  (Pl.\te  33.) 
She  sits  beside  a  tree,  with  a  basket  of  grapes  on  her  lap  and  a  bunch  of  them  held  up  in 
her  right  hand ;  she  is  dressed  in  a  yellow  bodice,  flowered  skirt  and  crimson  apron 
.■\  bird  is  perched  on  the  top  of  the  tree  which  forms  the  stopper.  The  base  is  inscribed 
with  the  motto  :  "  POUR  .MO.\  .'\MOUR  "  ;  it  is  concave  underneath  and  decorated  with 
a  rose  in  colours.  H.  3!^  in.,  W.  1}  in. 
Bemrose,  Bovu,  Chelsea  and  Derby  Porcelain,  illustration  on  p.  37. 

298.  Scent-bottle,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  girl  with  a  dog.     About  1760 

(Plate  33.) 

She  wears  a  flowered  dress  and  stands  with  a  basket  of  flowers  slung  from  her  shoulder.': 
a  bird  in  her  hands  and  a  Dalmatian  dog  seated  at  her  feet.  The  base  is  inscribed 
with  the  motto:  "  F  IDEl.LK  .ME  GUIDE";  it  is  concave  underneath  and  docorated 
with  a  rose  in  colours.     The  stopper  is  missing.     H.  2 J  in.,  W.  {J  in. 

U  2 


52  CHELSEA. 

299.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  a  girl  holding  a  basket 

of  flowers,  with  gilt  metal  mount  and  chain  to  the  stopper.  About  1760. 
(Plate  33.) 

She  is  loosely  draped  in  a  flowered  robe,  and  sits  beside  a  rose  tree  on  a  green  marbled  pedestal, 
with  a  basket  of  flowers  in  her  lap  and  a  flower  in  her  right  hand  ;  the  stopper  is  formed  of 
flowers.     H.  2f  in.,  W.  i  in. 

IJought  in  Paris  on  February  12th,  1874,  sec  Journals,  i.,  p.  351,     " went  on  to 

Oppenheim's  to  see  what  the  travelling  brother  had  brouglit  home  from  Germany,  whence 

he  arrived  the  previous  night we  at  once  seized  upon  and  carried  away  an 

exquisite  Chelsea  smelling-bottle,  formed  as  a  girl  smelling  at  a  flower  and  holding  roses, 
cheap  at  £y  12s." 

300.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  of  Cupid  beating  a  drum, 

with  gilt  metal  mount  and  chain  to  the  stopper.     About  1760.     (Plate  33.) 

lie  stands  in  front  of  a  rose-tree,  with  his  drum  slung  round  his  neck.  The  base  is  inscribed 
with  the  words  :  "  I'ENG.AGE  LES  COEURS  "  ;  it  is  concave  underneath  and  decorated  with 
a  rose  in  colours.     The  stopper  is  in  the  form  of  a  butterfly.     H.  35  in.,  W.   li  in. 

Bought  at  Rotterdam  on  October  15th,  1873,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  231,  "Van  .Minden  had  a  lovely 
little  bibelot  of  Cupid  with  drums,  also  £8." 

301.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper,  of  plain  white  porcelain,  in  the  form  of  a  figure 

of  a  woman  nursing  a  child.     About  1755.     (Plate   14.) 
She  sits,  attired  in  a  loose  robe,  on  a  rock  beside  a  tree-trunk,  with  the  child  in  her  arms.     .V 
buncli  of  grapes  forms  the  stopper.     H.  3!   in.,  \V.   i:|   in. 

302.  Scent-bottle,  in    the  form    of   a    bouquet    of   flowers,  with  engraved   silver 

stopper.     About  1760. 

The  flowers  are  painted  in  natural  colours.     H.  3  in.,  diam.   il  in. 

303.  Scent-bottle  and  Stopper,  in  the  form  of  a  bunch  of  bean-ilowers  springing 

from  a  flower-pot,  with  gold  mount  and  chain  to  the  stopper.     About  1760. 

(Plate  33.) 
The  flowers  are  painted  after  nature.     The  pot  is  decorated  with  floral  sprays  ;  a  butterfl\-  forms 
the  stopper.     H.  2f  in.,  diam.  i|  in. 

[304,  305.   Cane-h.\ndles.     Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   12.] 

306.  Thimble,  painted  in  colours  with  gilding.     .About   1760. 

'I'hc  thimble  has  a  saiUoped  edge  and  is  jiainted  with  a  bird  on  a  sprav  and  witli  the  motto  : 
•■  GAGE  DE  .MON  AMITIE."     II.  I  in. 

307-309.   Hreloques,  or  pendants  for   the  watch-chain,  moulded   in  various   forms,  all 
painted  in  enamel  colours  without  gilding  and  dating  from  about  1760. 

307     Two  faces  joined  together  at  the  back,  wearing  black  masks  ;  a  ribbon  dividing  them  is 
inscribed  "UNIS  P.VR  AMITIE."     L.  i  in. 

308.  .^  female  face  wearing  a  black  mask  and  a  plumed  cap,  mounted  in  gold.     The  eyes  are 

set  with  diamonds.     L.  i  in. 

309.  A  quiver  full  of  arrows,  painted  with  flowers  in  panels.     I,,   i   in. 

[310.   liRELooiE.     Venetian  (?)  glass,  see  \'o\.  III.] 

311.  ToBACCO-SToppER,  painted  in  colours  with  gilding.     About   17^*5- 

In    the  form  of  a  masked  bust   of  a  lady  wearing  a  feather  head-dress,  supported  on  a   draped 

pedestal,  the  base  of  which  is  incised  underneath  with  cross  hatching.     H.  25  in. 
A  somewhat  similar  piece  is  illustrated  in  Bemrose,  Boic,  Chelsea,  and  Derby  Porcelain,  p.  93. 


CHELSEA.  53 

312-323.  Twelve  Seals  in  the  form  of  small  figures  with  intagli,  chiefly  in  carnelian, 
set  with  gold  mounting  in  the  base.  All  except  No.  313,  which  is  in  plain 
white  porcelain,  are  painted  in  colours  without  gilding,  and  date  from  about 
1760. 

Height  of  each,  about  i  in. 

312.  .'\  dove  on  its  nest  in  a  basket  bordered  with  a  wreath.     Agate  intagHo.  a  bird  perched  on  a 

branch.     L.  f  in. 

313.  Shakespeare,  white   porcelain,  standing  figure  after   the  statue    in  Westminster  Abbey  by 

Peter  Scheemakers,  after  a  design  of  William  Kent.     Carnelian   intaglio,  a  serpent  and 
two  hearts  with  the  words :  "  IE  ENVIE." 
Bought   at  Amsterdam  on  May  13th,   1878,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.     122,   "We    got     .... 
a  good  Chelsea  bibelot  and  seal,  representing  Shakespeare,  at  Morpurgo's." 

314.  A  shepherd-boy  playing  a  pipe,  with  a  lamb  lying  at  his  feet.     Carnelian  intaglio,  cupid 

with  an  altar  and  two  hearts. 

315.  A   green   parrot,   on   a   base   inscribed  "  DISCRET   EN   AMOUR."     Carnelian   intaglio 

the  sun  and  a  sunflower,  with  the  words ;   "  AVOVS    SEV'LE." 
Bought  at  Amsterdam  on  March  i6th,  1874,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  255,  "  we  bought      .... 
at  Boasberg's     ....     a  lovely  Chelsea  seal  with  a  parrot,  £1." 

316.  Two  doves  billing,  on  a  stump  rising  from  a  flowered  base.     Carnelian  intaglio,  a  butterfly 

on  a  rose,  with  the  words :  "  S.ANS   L.^RCIN." 

317.  Punch,   masked,   in   striped   dress,   standing   on   a    base  inscribed   "  TOUJOURS   G.\'^'." 

Carnelian  intaglio,  a  bird  on  a  tree,  with  the  word  :   "  FIDEL." 

318.  Harlequin,   masked,   in   parti -coloured   dress,  w'ith   lath.     Carnelian   intaglio,  two  hearts 

between  palm-branches  with  the  Words  :  "  L'AMITIL." 

319.  Cupid   seated   on   a   pedestal   holding   a   globe,   on   a   base   inscribed   "JE     TIENS    LE 

NIONDE."      Carnelian    intaglio,   a    dove    holding    an    olive-branch,    with    the  word  : 
"  FIDELLE." 

320.  Boy  in  fancy  dress,  a  long  robe  over  a  riding  costume,  removing  a  mask  from  his  face  with 

his  left  hand;  the  base  inscribed  "JE  SUIS  DEM.^SOUE  (sic).'     Carnelian  intaglio,  a 
male  classical  head. 

321.  Kid  rising  on  its  hind  legs,  eating  grapes.     Carnelian  intaglio,  a  bearded  classical  head. 

322.  .V  peacock  perched  on  a  broken  column.     Carnelian  intaglio,  a  male  classical  head. 
Bought  in  London  in  October,  1874,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  318,  "We  have  gone  the  round  of 

the  London  shops     ....     we  have  picked  up     ...     .     one  small  Chelsea  seal  of  a 
peacock." 

323.  Cupid  draped  with  a  blue  scarf,  holding  a  heart  in  each  hand  and  resting  one  foot  on  a 

serpent ;  set  with  a  carnelian,  over  which  is  applied  a  twisted  cord  in  gold  for  stamping 
wafers. 

324.  Se.\l,  in  the  form  of   a   grotesque  figure  of   a  masked  woman  dancing,  painted 

in  colours.     About  1760. 

The  base  is  mottled  underneath  with  green.     H.  i   in. 

325.  Se.\l,  in  the  form  of  a  figure  in  military  dress,  painted  in  colours  with  gilding. 

.\bout  1765. 

.\  man  wearing  a  blue  cap,  fur-lined  purple  coat,  white  tunic,  yellow  breeches  and  top  boots. 
The  base  is  inscribed  "  V,\INCRE  OU  NIOURIR  '  and  painted  underneath  with  a 
cinquefoil.     H.  i  in. 

326.  Figure  of   a    boy  caressing  a  dog,  painted  in  colours,  made  for  mounting  as  a 

seal,     .\bout   1760. 

Naked  figure,  kneeling  on  a  mound  inscribed  "  .-V.MOUR    FIDELLE."     H.  1   in. 


34  Cni'LSEA. 

327.   'I'liiKTEEN  FiniiKUS,  made  fur  mounting  as  seals,  each  standing  on  a  green  mound, 
painted  in  colours  with  gilding.     About   1760. 
Height  of  each  about   i   in. 
a.  Cupid  riding  on  a  lion. 
h.  A  shepherd  boy  seated,  playing  bagpipes. 

c.  A  girl  carrying  a  basket  on  her  back,  with  a  dog  sittnig  at  her  feet. 

d.  A  boy  in  fancy  costume,  with  a  long  mantle. 

e.  A  man  in  Turkish  dress. 

/.  A  woman  in  a  red  fur-lined  cloak,  with  a  muff. 

g.  A  boy  dressed  as  a  huntsman,  blowing  a  horn,  with  a  dog  at  his  side. 

h.  A  girl  with  a  watering-pot  on  a  pedestal. 

i.  A  woman  carrying  a  basket  and  a  bunch  of  grapes. 

k.  Cupid  as  a  sportsman,  with  quiver,  hat  and  boots  and  red  scarf. 

/.  A  boy  in  fancy  costume,  with  a  long  mantle. 

m.  A  woman  dancing.  . 

?7.  A  man  seated  with  a  basket  of  flowers  on  his  back,  leaning  on  a  stick. 

The  last-named  was  bought  at  Frankfort-on-the-Main  on  September  2Gth,  1873,  see  Juurnah,  i., 
p  224,  "  we  heard  of  a  Chelsea  bibelot  (a  gardener  carrying  flowers),  which  Aultmann 
fetched   from  a   private   house   to   show  us,  and  which  we  eventually  bought,  though  at 

It  is  known  that  trinkets  of  similar  character  to  these  were  made  also  at  Derby,  and  it  is  possible 
that  some  of  the  above,  in  which  the  base  is  solid  and  not  concave  underneath  (a,  (>  e 
and  £•),  are  of  later  date  than  the  remainder  and  should  be  referred  to  the  Chelsea-Derby 
period. 

§  7.     PIECES  FOR  DOMESTIC   USE,   COLOURED. 
Nos.  328-408. 

The  painting  is  always  in  enamel  colours  over  the  glaze,  except  in 
the  case  of  the  dark  mazarine-blue,  where  it  occurs,  which  is  applied 
before  glazing.  Another  exception  is  that  of  a  plate  (No.  349)  painted 
only  in  underglaze  blue  in  imitation  of  Chinese  "  blue  and  white ' 
porcelain. 

328    Tureen  and  Cover,  in   the  form  of  a  rabbit,  painted  in  colours.     Mark  on  the 
inside,  an  anchor  and  "No.  i,"  in  red.     About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

The  rabbit  is  crouching  with  a  cabbage-leaf  in  its  mouth  and  other  leaves  on  either  side  of 
it,  on  two  of  which  are  snails.     The  mark  "No.  i  "is  repeated  on  the  cover.     H.Sj  in., 

In  the  s1ue'"catalogue  of  the  Chelsea  factory  for  March  30th,  175O,  Xo.  35,  is  "  .A  beautiful 
tureen    in  the  shape  of  a  rabbil  as  large  as  life,  and  a  fine  dish  to  ditto.      See  Read,  p.  7. 

Bought  at  Kotterdam  on  April  23rd,  1913,  see  Jouriials,  i  p.  432,  "Went  on  .  .  to  Uotterdam, 
where  we  obtained  a  magnificent  large  rabbit  of  old  red  anchor  Chelsea  at  \  an  Minden  s, 
very  cheap.  ...  He   only  asked  ;f;5  for  it  and  took  £4." 

Tureen  and  Cover,  in  the  form  of  a  pigeon,  painted  in  colours. 
Standing  on  a  mound  with  applied  llowcrs  and  leaves.     H.  5  in.,  L.  i:i  in. 

331.  Pairs  of  Tureens,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  26.] 


329. 


330 


[332.  Pair  of  Sugar-tureens,  Longton  Hall  porcelain,  see  p.   122.] 


CHELSEA.  55 

244.  SoiP-TUREEX,  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  un  anchor  in  red.     About  1755. 

Of  depressed  globular  form  with  two  loop  haiulles  in  the  form  of  twigs,  from  the  attachments  of 
which  spring  applied   sprays  of    flowers   and  foliage.     Painted   inside  and   outside  with 
bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  lavender-blue  outlined  in  grey.     H.  5'  Jn  _  \v.  14!  in. 
Tliis  piece  was  formerly  described  as  a  "bowl  for  flowers  "  ;  there  is,  however,  in  the  ^luseum, 
a  soup-tureen  of  precisely  similar  form  with  cover  and  stand  (No.  2062-igoi). 

333.  P.-^iR  OF  Sauce-boats,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  a  triangle 

incised.     About   1745.      (Platk  35.) 

Round  the  top  are  festoons  of  flowers,  fruit  and  foliage  in  relief.  The  shaped  base  is  moulded 
with  two  goats'  heads  and  two  boys'  masks  among  scrollwork.  Scrolled  loop  handle.  The 
inside  is  painted  with  a  bouquet  tied  with  ribbons,  the  outside  with  scattered  flowers,  sprays 
and  insects.     H.  4I  in.,  L.  7I  in.,  7I  in.  respectively. 

Church,  fig.  4  :  Chaffers,  fig.  492. 

334.  Dish,  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion. 

About  1750.     (Plate  36.) 

Oblong  octagonal.     Painted  with  sprays  of  flowers,  radishes,  and  insects.     L.  i^l  in.,  W.  12  in. 
Bought  in  1884,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  433,  "  I  have  bought  several  rather  remarkable  pieces  to  add 
to  the  collection — a  noble  raised  anchor  dish —  .  .  .  ." 

335.  Pair  of  Dishes,  moulded  inside  in  slight    relief  and    painted  in    colours    in    tl:e 

style  of  Meissen  porcelain.     Mark  on  one,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval 

medallion.     About   1750. 

Each  in  the  form  of  two  long  leaves  laid  one  over  the  other,  and  painted  with  a  brown  edge 
and  with  sprays  of  flowers  and  insects;  on  one  is  also  a  caterpillar  on  a  leaf.  The  lower 
side  of  the  rim  is  coloured  yellow.     L.  io|  in.,  10}  in.,  W.  7  in.,  7J  in.  respectively. 

336.  Pair    of    Dishes,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,  an    anchor    in    gold. 

About  1760.     (Plate  37.) 

Oval.  The  middle  is  white,  with  a  bird  in  the  centre  painted  in  colours  and  a  scrolled  fringe 
tinted  in  green.  The  rim,  which  is  moulded  with  scale-pattern  and  has  a  wavy  edge  with 
feather-pattern  in  relief,  is  claret-coloured,  decorated  with  gilt  sprays  of  flowers.  I..  13^  in.. 
13!  in.,  W.  10}  in.,  io|  in.  respectively. 

337.  Pair  of  Dishes,  painted  in  colours  and   gilt,  in  the  style  of  Jaj)anesc  "Imaii" 

porcelain.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  38.) 

Saucer-shaped  with  scalloped  rim.  The  decoration  is  painted  in  mazarine-blue  under  the  glaze 
and  in  red  and  two  shades  of  green  with  gilding  over  it.  In  the  middle  is  a  flowering 
branch  of  chrysanthemum.  The  rim  is  divided  into  twelve  panels,  four  large  ones  con- 
taining /ii-ii)!»s-blossom  or  other  flowers  and  eight  smaller  ones  in  pairs  filled  w-ith  two 
different  diaper-patterns.  On  the  underside  of  the  rim  are  three  spra)  s  of  tree-peony.  Each, 
diam.  8  in. 
Formerly  in  the  collection  of  the  Earl  of  Lonsdale. 
Dillon,  Porcelain,  1904,  pi.  xlv. 

338.  Dish,  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  red.     About   1755. 

Of  eight-sided  oblong  form,  the  sides  curving  outwards  at  the  top.  Painted  inside  w-ith 
four  bouquets  and  scattered  sprays  of  flowers.     II.  2^  in.,  L.  9  in. 

339.  Dish,  painted  in  colours,  in  the  style  of  Meissen  porcelain.     Mark,  an  anciior  in 

red.     About   1755.     (Pl.\te  36.) 

Circular,  with  shaped  rim  moulded  in  relief  with  three  rococo  panels  separated  by  trellis- 
pattern.  The  panels  are  painted  with  groups  of  figures  among  buildings,  trees  and 
shipping.     In  the  middle  are  sprays  of  flowers.     Brown  edge.     Diain.  16}  in. 

This  model  is  called  the  "  Warren  Hastings  pattern,"  from  the  circumstance  that  a  set  of 
this  pattern  was  included  in  the  sale  of  his  effects  at  Daylesford  House  in  1818. 


56  CHELSEA. 

340.  Pair  or   Dishes,  painted   in  colours.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  red    (No.   19.)      About 

1755-     (Platk  36.) 

Heart-shaped.      P.-iinted    with  three  exotic  birds  among  buslies.     I..   loj   in.,  W.  yj   in.,  7  in. 

respectively. 
Burton,  English  Porcelain,  (ig.  g. 

341.  Pair  of  Dishes,  painted  in  colours.     Mark  on  one,  an  anchor  in  blue  enamel  over 

the  glaze.     About  1755.     (Plate  36.) 

Heart-shaped;  decorated  with  a  border  of  shaped  panels  reserved  on  a  yellow  ground  and 
painted  with  bouquets  and  insects.  The  ground  itself  is  also  painted  with  a  butterlly 
and  detached  leaves  or  flowers.     L.  11  in.,  iij  in.,  W.  7}  in.  7j  in.  respectively. 

342.  Pair  of    Dishes,  moulded  in  the    form  of    lettuce-leaves  laid    one  over    another 

and  painted  in  colours.     About  1750. 

The  leaves  are  edged   with  green  and   yellow,  and    painted   with   sprays  of   flowers   and  (on 

one  of  the  dishesj  an  insect.     L.  15  in.,  W.  \o\  in.,  lo^  in.  respectively. 
Bought    in    London    on  November  24th,  1884,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  458,  "  Called  at  Partridge's 

and  Button's   (at  the  latter   place  took  a   fancy  to     .     ,     .     some  lettuce-shaped  Chelsea 

dishes)." 

439.  Bowl  WITH  Cover  AND  Stand,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.    About  1760.    (Plate  38. j 

The  bowl  and  cover  are  moulded  with  basket-work  (on  the  latter  piercedj  and  decorated 
with  applied  sprays,  with  flowers  coloured  mazarine-blue  and  gold  and  green  foliage 
veined  with  red  ;  the  cover  has  a  handle  twined  about  with  a  blue  ribbon.  The  stand 
has  two  handles  in  the  form  of  twigs  with  flowers  and  leaves,  and  a  border  moulded 
with  quatrefoils  of  the  same  colour  as  the  flowers  on  the  bowl,  fhe  inside  of  the 
bowl  and  the  middle  of  tlie  stand  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours.  Bowl 
and  cover,  H.  8|  in.,  diam.   7I  in.  ;  stand,  diam.   !o\  in. 

Church,  fig.   14. 

343.  Dish,  painted   in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1765. 

Of  eight-sided  oblong  form,  the  sides  curving  outwards  at  tlie  top.  Inside  on  the  bottom  is 
a  bouquet  enclosed  by  a  broad  framework  of  gilding  on  a  mazarine-blue  ground;  round 
the  rim  are  festoons  of  flowers  in  colours,  hanging  from  a  border  of  conventional 
ornament  in  gold  on  mazarine-blue.     H.  2|  in.,  L.  8j  in. 

344.  Pair  of  Dishes,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755. 

Oval  with  wavy  rim.     Painted  on  the  rim  with  inserts,  and   in  the  middle,  one  with  a  duck 

and  a  finch,  the  other  with  otlier  birds,  among  bushes.  I..  8J  in.,  8J  in.  resjiectively, 
each,  \V.  61  in. 

Illustrated  in   The  Connoisseur,  vol.  xxvi.,  p.  226. 

63.   Dish,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     .About   1760. 

Oval  with  wavy  edge ;  the  rim  is  moulded  w-ith  vine-leaves,  stems  and  grapes,  which  are 
painted  in  colours.     In  the  middle  are  sprays  of  flowers.     I..   11   in.,  W.  qi  in. 

81.   Plate,  painted  in  colours.     .About  1755.    (Plate  34.) 

The  rim  has  a  moulded  feather-edge  coloured  brown  and  is  painted  with  three  sprays  of 
fruit,  apparently  intended  for  wild  strawberries;   in  the  middle  are  insects.     Diam.  81   in. 

345.  Pair  of  Dishes,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755. 

Each  in  the  form  of  a  sunflower  with  other  smaller  flowers  and  leaves ;  the  stalk,  twined 
about  with  a  ribbon,  forms  the  loop  handle.     W.  6|  in. 


CHELSEA.  57 

346.  Trav,  painted    in    colours,  with    gilding,  in    imitation  of   Japanese    Kakiyemon 

ware.     About  1755.     (Pl.\te  35.J 

Circular  with  low  sides.  In  the  middle  is  a  circular  medallion  enclosing  two  phoenixes, 
from  which  radiate  six  panels,  three  of  them  with  gilt  flowers  and  synmietrical  scrolled 
foliage  in  blue  or  green  on  a  red  ground,  the  alternate  three  painted  with  a  pine-tree, 
(lowering  pruitus  and  bamboo  respectively.  Round  the  side  is  a  conventional  floral 
border.     Diani,    11^  in. 

347.  Plate,  painted   in   colours  and  gilt,  of  the  same  pattern  as  the  service  given  by 

George  III.  and  Queen  Charlotte  in  1763  to  the  brother  of  the  latter,  the  Duke 
of  Mecklenburg-Strelitz.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1763.     (Pl.a.te  39.) 

In  the  middle  is  an  exotic  bird  among  bushes  surrounded  by  insects.  The  rim  has  a  wavy  edge 
with  gilt  shell-pattern  interrupted  by  live  shaped  panels  enclosing  insects  in  gold  on  a 
mazarine-blue  ground  ;  between  the  panels  are  festoons  of  flowers.     Diam.  8}  in. 

348.  Two    Pi.ATES,  iminted    in    black    outline    washed    over    with    green  and    further 

decorated  with  gilding.  In  the  middle  of  one  is  a  view  with  slight  modifications 
of  Chelsea  Parish  Church  seen  from  the  Thames.  Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold. 
.•\bout  1760.     (Plate  39.) 

In  the  middle  of  the  secon<l  plate  is  a  landscape  with  a  pinnacled  tower  within  a  walled 
enclosure.     The  rim  of  both    plates  has  a  wavy  edge  with  gilt  border.     Each,  diam.  8}  in. 

349.  Soup-pl.vte,  painted  in  underglaze  blue  in  the  Chinese  style.     Mark,  an  anchor  in 

blue,  also  under  the  glaze  (No.   18).     About  1755. 

Painted  in  the  middle  with  two  mythical  Chinese  birds  (feng-huang),  in  a  rocky  landscape  with 

trees.     On  the  rim  is  a  border  of  diaper  ornament  interrupted  by  five   panels  enclosing 

Howers.     The  edge  is  lobed.     Diam.  9  in. 
Formerly  in  the  Bandinel  Collection. 
Burton,  English  I'nrcelaiti,  pi.  ii. 

350.  Soup-plate,  painted   in  colours  and    gilt,    in    imitation   of    Japanese  Kakiyemon 

ware.     About  1755. 

Twelve-sided  rim  with  wavy  edge.     In  the  middle   is   a  red  crane  standing  among  flowering 

plants  ;  above  is  a  blue  crane  flying.     The  rim  is  decorated  with  a  border  of  conventional 

flowers  and  close  foliage.     Diam.  Pj  in. 
Burton,  English  Porcelain,  pi.  iv. 

351.  Plate,  painted  in   colours.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  led.     About   1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Octagonal,  the  rim  moulded  with  foliated  scrollwork  and  painted  with  exotic  birds  in  pairs 
amid  foliage.  In  the  middle  are  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers.  Brown  edge. 
Diam.  SJ  in. 

352.  Plate,  moulded   in  relief  and  painted   in  colours  with  .'\esop's  fable  of  the   Fox, 

the  Dog  and  the  Cock.     .'Vbout   1750.     (Plate  35.) 

The  scene  of  the  fable  is  represented  as  a  landscape  with  a  river  and  distant  mountains.  The 
rim  is  moulded  with  shell  ornament  and  painted  with  detached  flowers.     Diam.  9  in. 

[353.  Two  Plates,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  20.] 

[354.  Two  Plates,  Staffordshire  porcelain,  sec  p.   153.] 


58  CHELSEA. 


355.  I'l.ATH,  painted   in   bl;i(k  outline,  waslied   over   with  green  and  further  decorated 

with  gilding.     About  1760. 

In  the  middle  is  a  landscape  with  ruins  and  shipping.  Kound  the  rim  is  a  gilt  zigzag  border. 
Diam.  6;]  in. 

356.  Dish,  painted    in    colours    with    .Aesop's    fable    of   the    Eagle   and    the  Jackdaw. 

About   1750.     (Pl.\tk  35.J 

Oblong  with  fluted  rim,  on  which  are  small  sprays  of  flowers;  the  fable  is  painted  in  a  panel 
conforming  with  the  shape  of  the  disli.     L.  8  in.,  W.  6;   in. 

[357.  SwEET.MEAT-niSH,  Bow  porcelain,  sec  p.   18.] 

358.  S.VEETMEAT-STAND,   in  the   form  of  shells  and  rockwork  in  three  tiers,  painted    in 
colours.     About  1755. 

The  tiers  are  composed  of  large  scallop-shells,  edged  with  yellow  and  painted  inside  with 
bouquets  of  flowers.  They  are  supported  by  an  erection  of  rockwork  and  weeds  encrusted 
with  smaller  shells.     H.  bl  in.,  W.  8^  in. 

[359.  Dessert-basket  and  Stand,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  26.] 

360.  Pair   of   Sugar-bowls   with    Covers,    painted    in   colours  and   decorated    with 

gilding.     About  1755. 

Each  in  the  form  of  an  oval  basket  with  applied  yellow  flowers  at  the  points  of  intersection, 
supported  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base,  round  the  top  of  which  are  applied  flowers  and  foliage. 
The  covers  are  surmounted  by  a  yellow  bird  among  flowers  and  leaves.  Each,  H.  5  m., 
W.  3|  in. 

361.  Pair  of  Sugar-boxes  with  Covers,  each   in   the   form    of   three   figs  conjoined, 

l)ainted  in  natural  colours.     Mark  inside  one,  an  anchor  in  red.      About  1755. 
(Plate  34.) 

In  the  Sale  Catalogue  for  April  5th,  1756,  lot  26  consists  of  "four  fme  groupes  of  figs";  see 
Read,  p.  23.     Each,  H.  3I  in.,  W.  3J  in. 

362    CusTARD-cup,    painted    in   colours   and   gilt.     Mark,    an    anchor  in  gold,     .^bout 

1765.      (PL.4TE    38.) 

On  one  side  is  a  lady  playing  a  guitar  and  on  the  other  a  man  pipmg,  m  a  shaped  panel 
bordered  by  gilt  flowers  and  trelliswork  reserved  on  a  mazarine-blue  ground.  H.  2^  m., 
diam.  2^  in. 

363.   PuNCH-POT  AND  CovER,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755.     (Pl.\te  34.) 

Bodv  nearly  globular,  painted  on  either  side  with  e.xotic  birds  among  trees,  curved  spout 
'moulded  with  leaf-ornament  coloured  green,  loop  handle  decorated  with  leafy  scrolls  in 
purple.  The  cover  is  surmounted  by  a  lemon  with  leaves  forming  a  knob  and  painted 
with  butterflies  and  other  insects.     H.  SJ  in.,  W.  iij  in.  ,       ,    j      /-i     1 

..\  punch-pot  of  similar  form  of  salt-glazed  stoneware  was  acquired  by  Lady  Charlotte 
Schreiber  in  1873,  with  an  inscription  notifying  that  "this  Punch-pot"  was  made  to 
celebrate  "Chapman's  return  to  Hull";  it  was  destroyed  in  the  fire  at  the  Ale.xandra 
Palace  in  1873. 

120.  Coffee-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Bulbous  body,  wide  neck,  long  curved  spout,  scrolled  loop  handle,  domed  cover.  Both  body 
and  cover  are  reeded.  On  either  side  of  the  body  and  on  the  cr>ver  are  sprays  of  flowers ; 
the  spout  is  moulded  at  the  top  and  bottom  with  cabbage-leaves  edged  with  green. 
H.  8|  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 


CHELSEA.  59 

121.  CoiFEE-POT  AND  CoYER,  painted  in  colours.     (Pl.\te  34.) 

Pear-shaped  body,  wide  neck,  long  curved  spout,  scrolled  loop  handle,  domed  cover.  Both 
body  and  cover  are  reeded.  On  either  side  of  the  body  are  birds  perched  on  branches 
of  fruit-trees;  the  cover  is  painted  with  insects.  The  spout  is  moulded  at  the  top  and 
bottom  with  cabbage-leaves  edged  with  green  and  yellow.     H.  8f  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 

Bought  at  Frankfort-on-the  Main  on  September  15th,  1880,  see  Joimials,  ii.,  p.  288.  "Went 
out  to  explore  the  shops.  Found  it  was  a  Jews'  holiday  and  every  place  shut  up,  except 
one,  where  we  got  a  beautiful  Bow  Coffee  Pot,  painted  in  birds,  but  unfortunately 
cracked." 

98.  Jug,  painted  en  camdieu  in  crimson  and  gilt.     About   1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Slightly  flattened  ovoid  bodv,  projecting  lip  moulded  with  a  mask  wearing  a  frilled  collar, 
scrolled  loop  handle.  Painted  with  flowering  plants,  wattled  fencing,  and  sprays,  adapted 
from  designs  on  Japanese  Kakiyemon  ware.  Round  the  top  is  a  border  of  flowers  and 
foliage  on  a  rontinuDUS  wavy  stem.     H.  yj  in.,   W.  5  in. 

99.  Kg,  painted  in  colours.      On  the  front  is  the  initial  "  G  "  under  a  baron's  coronet. 

About   1755.     (Pl.\te  34. j 

Ovoid  body,  wide  neck  tapering  slightly  upwards,  projecting  lip,  scrolled  loop  handle.  The 
initial  is  surrounded  by  a  wreath  of  flowers  and  barley ;  at  the  back  are  sprays  of 
flowers  and  insects.  The  handle  is  decorated  with  leafy  scrolls  in  red.  H.  9  in., 
diam.  5I  in, 

100.  Jug,  painted  in  colours.     .^\bout   1755. 

Pear. shaped  with  projecting  lip  and  scrolled  loop  handle.  Painted  on  either  side  with  groups 
of  birds,  in  one  case  in  a  landscape,  in  the  other  perched  on  a  branch.  Below  the  lip 
are  insects.  The  rim  has  a  brown  edge,  and  the  handle  is  painted  with  conventional 
ornament  in  crimson.     H.  &\  in.,  diam.  6  in. 

[364,  365.  Jugs,  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  74.] 

366.  Jug,  painted  in  colours.     .-Vbout   1755.     (Pl.\te  34.) 

Pear-shaped  body,  spreading  foot,  projecting  lip,  scrolled  loop  handle.  Painted  on  one  side 
with  a  group  of  exotic  birds  among  bushes,  and  on  the  other  with  a  single  bird  on  a 
branch.     H.  5j  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

367.  Jug,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Ovoid,  with  projecting  lip  moulded  in  the  form  of  a  bearded  mask,  loop  handle,  (^n  one 
side  are  two  exotic  l)irds  perclied  on  a  bush  with  a  heap  of  fruit  in  the  foreground. 
The  other  side  is  painted  with  ears  of  barley  and   flowers.     H.  6.^   in.,  diam.  4?   in. 

[368.   Mug,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  24.] 

369.  Mug,  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  red.     About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Inverted  bell-shaped  with  loop  handle.  On  one  side  is  a  bouquet ;  the  remaining  surface  is 
painted  with  scattered  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  $\  in.,  diam.  4}  in. 

103.  Mug,  painted  in  colours.     About   1755. 

Inverted  bell-shaped  with  scrolled  loop  handle ;  painted  on  one  side  with  a  group  of  exotic 
birds  among  trees,  and  on  the  other  with  a  single  bird  perched  on  a  branch.     H.  5J  in., 

diam.  4J  in. 


6o  CHELSEA. 

370.  I'.Mi;  oi'  Mugs,  painted   in  colours.     .About   i/f-if- 

riarrel-stiaped  with  hoops  in  low  relief  and  loop  handle.  Painted  with  two  bouquets  and 
small  sprigs  of  flowers.     H.  53  in.,  5!   in.  respectively;  each,  diam._  4  in. 

These  mugs  are  similar  in  style  of  painting  to  two  butter-tubs  (No.  40S),  on  which  the 
turquoise-blue  pigment  appears. 

371.  Mug,  painted  in  colours,     .\bout  1755.     (Pl.vte  34.) 

Ovoid  body  painted  on  one  side  with  a  bouquet,  and  on  the  other  with  a  spray  of  flowers, 
slightly  expanding  mouth,  scrolled  loop  handle.     H.  4  in.,  diam.  3^  in. 

372.  l').\siN,  painted  in  colours  in  the  style  of    Meissen  porcelain.       Mark,  an    anchor 

in  red.     .About  1755.     (Pl.\te  34.) 

Octagonal  wi  h  projecting  rim.  Painted  outside  with  floral  sprays_  and  a  butterfly,  and 
inside  on, the  bottom  with  a  bud  and  two  insects.     H.   2j  in.,  W.  4-J-  in. 

373.  lUsiN,  painted  in  colours  in  imitation  of  Chinese  porcelain  of  the  jamille  vevtc. 

Mark,  an  anchor  in  red  (No.  17).     .About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  372.  The  outside  is  painted  with  two  groups  of  chrysanthemums 
and  other  flowering  plants,  and  with  narrow  borders  of  Chinese  sceptre-head  ornament. 
Inside  on  the  bottom  is  a  chrysanthemum  spray,  and  on  the  rim  a  border  of  floral 
ornament  on  a  dotted  green  band.     H.  2f  in.,  \V.  4  in. 

374.  Pair  of  Cups,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

.Xearly  cylindrical  with  rounded  base  and  wavy  edge.  Painted,  one  with  two  partridges 
among  herbage  on  one  side,  and  with  a  duck  flying  on  the  other,  the  other  with  a 
group  of  birds  among  rushes  and  herbage  on  one  side,  and  with  two  birds  flying  on  the 
other.     Each,  H.  2%  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

375.  Basin,  painted  in  colours  in  imitation  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon  ware.     Mark,  an 

anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About   1750.     (Plate  35.J 

Hexagonal  with  wavy  rim  turned  slightly  outwards.  The  outside  is  painted  with  a  tiger  and  a 
dragon,  with  /i^Hinis-tree,  chrysanthemum,  bamboo  and  Pauhm'tiia  imperialis:  on  the  inside 
are   a  coiled  dragon   and  sprays  of  flowers.     H.   3  in.,  diam.  6|  in. 

376.  Basin,  painted  en  cama'ieu  in  crimson.     About  1755.     (Plate  35.) 

Octagonal  with  rim  turned  outwards.  Painted  outside  with  an  Oriental  caravan  in  a  desert,  a 
bouquet  of  flowers  and  a  butterfly  :  inside  the  rim  are  also  bouquets.     H.  3I  in.,  diam.  6  in. 

377.  Tea-pot    and    Covek,  painted    in    colours   and    gilt,    in    imitation    of    Japanese 

Kakiyemon  ware.     Mark,  a  triangle  incised.     Made  about    1745,   but   probably 
decorated  some  years  later.     (Pl.ate  35.) 

Hexagonal,  with  loop  handle  and  short  strait  spout.     The  body  and  cover  are  divided  into  six 
panels,'  decorated  alternately  with  a  gilt  rosette  amid   white  foliated  spirals  on  a  red  ground 
and  with  a  floral  sprav  or  a  fan  and  ribbons.     H.  $\  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 
The  decoration  is  of  the  same  pattern  as  that  of  two  cups  and  saucers.  No.  403,  and  a  vase. 
No.  237,  which  is  marked  with  an  anchor  in  red. 

378.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  in  the  style  of  Meissen  porcelain.     Abou; 

1755-     (Plate  35.) 

T"he  body,  straight  spout,  and  cover  are  reeded.  The  body  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  and 
insects.     On  the  cover  is  a  landscape  with  a  ruin.     H.  4!  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 


CHELSEA.  6i 

379.  Cream-jug,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted    in  colours.     Mark,  an   anchor  in   red. 

About  1755.     (Plate  34.) 

Of  oval  section,  spiralU'  fluted,  with  \va\'y  rim,  scrolled  loop  handle,  and  a  border  of  acanthus 
foliage  in  relief,  coloured  green,  pink  and  yellow,  round  the  base.  The  upper  part  is  painted 
with  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours.     H.  3I  in.,  W.   <,\  in. 

380.  Cream-jug,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755. 

Of  oval  section,  reeded,  with  scalloped  rim  and  scrolled  loop  handle.  On  either  side  is  a 
landscape  with  ruins  in  a  shaped  panel ;  on  the  front  and  inside  on  the  bottom  arc  floral 
sprays.     On    cither  side  of  the  handle  is  an   insect.     H.   3]:  in.,   \\'.  3^    in. 

381.  Saucer,  painted    in    colours.      Mark,    an    anchor    in   relief    on    an    applied    oval 

medallion.     About  1750. 

Painted  with  a  group  of  fruit.     Scalloped   riin.     Diaiii.  4J;   in. 

382.  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  in   imitation  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon  ware.     Mark,  an 

anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About   1750. 

Octagonal,  with  border  of  conventional  flowers  amid  close  foliage  in  red  and  yellow.  In  the 
middle  is  a  coiled  dragon  within  a  circular  medallion,  outside  which  are  two  cranes,  a 
pine-tree  and  bamboo.     Diam.  35-  in. 

383.  Two  Saucers,  painted   in   colours,  in    imitation   of  Japanese  Kakiyemon  ware. 

.Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About  1750.    (Plate  35.) 
Octagonal,  painted  with  a  lady  beside  a  pavilion  hung  with  curtains  in  which  is  a  vase,  .\bovc 
is  a  bird  flying.     Diam.  4^  in.,  4j  in.  respectively. 

384.  Two  Saucers,  painted  en  camaieu  in  crimson  with  .Aesop's  fables  of  the  Lion  and 

tiie  Mouse,  and  the  Wolf  and  the  Crane  respectively.  Mark,  on  the  first,  an 
anchor  in  relief  coloured  red  on  an  applied  oval  medallion,  on  the  second,  an 
anchor  painted  in  red.     .Xboiit   175s- 

Wavy  rim   painte^d   with   Hor,-il   spr.iys.      Di.ini,    4      in.,   ^]   in.   rfbpec:tivcly. 

385.  Cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  coloms  ;  on  the  saucer  is  Aesop's  iabie  of  tiie  Two 

Pots.  Mark,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  ajjplicd  oval  medallion.  About  1750. 
(Plate  35.) 

Jjoth  pieces  octagonal.  The  cup,  which  has  no  han<Ue.  is  painted  with  two  bears  in  a  landscape. 
The  fable  on  the  saucer  is  painted  in  a  circular  medallion  surrounded  by  sprays  of  flowers. 
Cu]),  H.  2}  in.,  diam.  3}  in.;  saucer,  diam.  3J  in. 

386.  Cup,  painted  in  colours,  in   the  style  of  Meissen  jjorcelain.     Mark,  an  anchor  in 

relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.     About  1750.     (Plate  36.) 

Of  cinquefoil  section,  moulded  with  narrow  wavy  leaves  and  painted  with  detached  flowers 
and  caterpillars.     H.  jj  in.,  diam.  2J  in. 

387.  Cii'  AND  Saucer,  painted  in   colours;  on  the  saucer  is  .\csoj)'s  fable  of  the  1  lorse 

and  the  Stag.  Mark,  on  the  cup,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval 
medallion.     .About   1750.     (Plate  35. j 

Itotli  pieces  octagonal.  The  cup,  which  has  no  handle,  is  painted  with  two  panthers  in  a 
landscape.  The  fable  on  the  saucer  is  painted  in  a  circular  medallion  surrounded  liv 
sprays  of  flowers.     Cup,  II.  2.J  in.,  diam.  3',   in.;  saucer,  diam.   si  '". 


62  CHELSEA. 

388  Cup  and  Saucur,  painted  in  colours  in  imitation  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon  ware. 
Mark  on  the  saucer,  an  anchor  in  relief  on  an  applied  oval  medallion.  About 
1750.     (Platf.  35.) 

The  cup  is  fluted  and  lias  a  scrolled  loop  luindle  ;  it  is  painted  on  either  side  with  a  quad  among 
(lowering  plants.  The  saucer  has  a  lluted  rim,  painted  with  birds  flying  or  perched  on 
branches  of  llowers.     Cup,  H.  2|  in.,  diam.  3I  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  4^  in. 

389.  Cup,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.  Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold,  .\bout  1760. 
(Plate  38.) 

On  either  side  is  a  group  of  exotic  birds  among  bushes  painted  in  colours,  in  a  shaped  panel 
with  a  border  of  gilt  flowers  and  scrollwork  reserved  on  a  mazarine-blue  ground.  1  wo 
wavy  loop  handles.     H.  2]  in.,  W.  il  in. 

390    CiiocoL.vrE-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  the  style  of  Meissen 
porcelain.     Mark  on  the  cup,  an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  38.) 
Both  pieces  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours  on  a  yellow  ground.     The. cup  has  two 
rococo-scrolled  loop  handles.     Cup,  H.  31  in.,  W.   5}   in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  5^-  in. 

391.  Chocolate-cup  .vxd  Saucer,  painted    in    black  outline   washed  over   with  green 
and  further  decorated  with  gilding.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1760. 
'Ihe  cup  has  two  scrolled  loop  handles  and  is  decorated  on  either  side  with  a  landscape  with 
buildings;  on   the  saucer  are   two  similar  landscapes.     Cup,  H.  2^   in.,  W.  3J  in. ;  saucer, 
diam.  j|  in. 

[392.  Cups  and  S.vucers,  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  sec  p.  74. J 

393.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted  in   colours  and  gilt.      Mark,  an  anchor  m 
gold.     About  1765. 

The  cups  and  the  rims  of  the  saucers  are  fluted.  Botli  cups  and  saucers  are  decorated  with  a 
border  in  purple  and  gold  twined  about  with  turquoise-blue  ribbons,  and  with  sprays  of 
flowers.  The  cups  have  no  handle.  Both  cups,  H.  i|  in.,  diam.  y,  in. ;  saucers,  diam. 
4I  in.,  4-|-  in.  respectively. 

[394.   Cups  and  Saucers,  Chelsea -Derby  porcelain,  see  p.  74.] 

395.  Two    Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted    in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,    an    anchor 

in  gold.     About  1760. 

Tlie  lower  part  of  the  cups  and  a  wide  band  round  the  middle  of  the  saucers  are  moulded  w  itfi 
imbricated  scale-pattern.  Both  cups  and  saucers  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  and 
fruit.     The  cups  liave  no  handle.     Cups,   H.  ij   in.,  diam.   if  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4;   m. 

396.  Chocolate-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in   colours  and  gilt.      iNIark  on  the  saucer, 

an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1765.     (Pl.vte  38.) 

Both  pieces  are  decorated  with  imbricated  peacock's-feather  pattern  in  slight  relief,  painted  in 
crimson,  yellow  and  turquoise-blue,  beyond  which  are  gilt  festoons  of  laurel  leaves.  The 
cup  has  'two  scrolled  loop  handles.     Cup,  H.   24  in.,  W.  4^  in.;  saucer,  diam.  5J  in. 

397.  Coffee  CUP  .vnd    Saucer,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,    an    anchor    in 

gold.     -About  1770. 

Botli  pieces  have  a  border  of  conventional  leaves  in  turquoise-blue  twined  about  bands  of 
crimson  and  gold,  the  remaining  surface  being  painted  with  flowers  in  colours.  Cup, 
II.  2I  in.,  diam.  2^  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  5}  in. 


CHELSEA.  63 

398.  Two  Tea-cups,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     About  1765. 

Decorated  outside  with  a  border  of  gilt  festoons  of  vine-leaves  on  a  dark  blue  band  with 
shaped  edge,  below  which  are  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours.    On  the  bottom  inside  is  als©  a 

floral  s])ray.     Each,  H,   ij  in.,  diam.  3  in. 

399.  Cup,    painted    en    camaieu    in    crimson.      Mark,  an    anchor    in  red.     About   1755. 

(Plate  34.) 

The  cup  is  reeded,  with  scalloped  edge,  and  has  no  haiidlt-.  It  is  painted  with  a  skirmish  of 
cavalry  beside  a  lake.     H.  25  in.,  diam.  35  in. 

[399a.  Saucer,  Chinese  porcelain,  see  p.   166.] 

400.  Two  Tea-cups  axd  Saucers,  painted   in   colours.     Mark,  on    one    cup  and  one 

saucer,  an  anchor  in  red.     About   1755. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  painted  with  large  sprays  of  llowers  and  insects.  The  cups  have  no 
handle.  Cups,  H.  i|  in.,  i !  in.,  diam.  2j  in.,  2|  in.  respectively  ;  saucers,  diam.  4I  in.,  4J  in. 
respectively. 

401.  Cup,  painted  in  colours.     Marked  with  crossed  swords  under  the  glaze   in  blue 

in  imitation  of  Meissen  porcelain  (No.  24).     .\bout  1750.     (Plate  36.) 

Octagonal  with  loop  handle.  Painted  outside  witli  insects  and  inside  with  a  bouquet  tied  with 
a  ribbon.     H.  2}  in.,  diam.  2f  in. 

The  occurrence  of  a  mark  so  unusual  on  Ciielsca  porcelain  suggests  that  the  piece  may  have 
been  made  to  complete  a  Meissen  service.  The  cup  was  bought  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber 
in  Paris  on  .March  nth,  1872,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  136,  "  On  our  way  [to  the  Ouai  Voltaire] 
we  had  met  with  a  curious  Octagon  Chelsea  cup,  painted  with  insects,  and  marked  in  blue 
with  the  Dresden  swords,  12s.,  this  was  at  Cliapin's." 

402.  Twn  Cups  and  Saucers,  painted  in  colours.     About  1755. 

The  cups  have  two  scrolled  loop  handles  and  the  saucers  an  openwork  gallery  to  receive  the 
cups  decorated  outside  with  applied  rosettes.  Both  cups  and  saucers  are  painted  with  sprays 
of  flowers.     Cups,  H.  i^  in.,  W.  4^  in.;  saucers,  diam.  5}  in. 

403.  Twd    Cups  axd  Saucers,  painted  in  colours   and  gilt,  in   imitation  of  Japanese 

Kakiyemon  ware.    Xbout  1750. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  octagonal,  the  sides  being  decorated  alternatL-ly  with  .a  gilt  rosette 

amid  white   foliated    spirals  on    a   red   ground,  and  with    a  floral   spray  and  a  fan  and 

ribbons.     Cups,  FL  ij  in.,  diam.  2j  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  4J  in. 
These  cups  and  saucers  are  of  the  same  pattern  as  a  tea-pot,    No.  377,  and  vase,  Ko.   237. 

".\n  octagon  Chelsea  tea-set  in  imitation  of  old  Japan  £j  los.," figures  in  a  sale  catalogue 

of  1771  ;  see  Nightingale,  p.   .\l. 

404.  CoFi-EE-cup  AXD  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770. 

On  either  side  of  the  cup  are  two  exotic  birds  among  bushes  painted  in  somewhat  pale  colours 
in  a  shaped  panel,  bordered  by  gilt  trelliswork  and  flowers,  reserved  on  a  mazarine-blue 
ground  ;  the  rim  of  the  saucer  also  has  a  mazarine-blue  ground,  with  similar  pairs  of 
birds  in  three  reserved  panels.     Cup,  H.  25  in.,  diam.  2J  in.;  saucer,  diam.  5',-  in. 

This  cup  and  saucer  are  doubtfully  included  under  this  heading.  The  quality  of  the  glaze  and 
pale  colours  suggest  that  they  may  have  been  made  at  Chelsea  during  the  "  Chelsea-Derby  " 
period  of  the  factory,  see  p.  6j. 

405.  Cup,   painted   in   colours    in    imitation    of    Japanese    KakiNCmun    ware.     About 

1750.     (Pl.\te  35.) 

Bell-shaped  with  slight  fluting  and  wavy  edge  :  painted  outside  with  two  quails,  a  /n-uMiis-tree, 
and  other  flowering  plants.  Inside  are  floral  spravs  and  a  ladv-bird.  H.  2;;  in.,  diam. 
35  in- 


64  CHELSEA. 

406.  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  with  Aesop's  fable  of  the  Wolf  and  the  Goat.     .'Xbout 
1750- 

Octagonal.      Ihe  subject  is  painted   in  .1   circular   medallion   surrounded  by  S[)rays  of  flowers. 
Diani.  4'|'   in. 

[407.  Cur,   Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  sec  p.  75.] 

408.   Pair  oi-    Butier-tubs    with    Covers    and    Stands,  painted    in    colours.     About 

1765- 

The  tubs  cylindrical,  expanding  slightly  upwards,  with  three  small  scroll  feet  and  two  handles 
rising  above  the  rim.  On  the  top  ol  the  covers  is  a  scrolled  ring  handle.  The  stands  have 
a  scalloped  rim.  All  the  pieces  are  painted  with  boucjuets  and  sprays  of  flowers.  Tubs 
with  covers,  H.  5  in.  each,  diam.  4J  in.,  4I  in.  respectively  ;  stands,  diam.  5if  in.,  6J  in. 
respectively. 
Bought  at  Amsterdam  on  November  5th,  1872,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  172,  "On  to  Kalb  and  Soujet's, 
where  we  ...  .  revived  our  drooping  spirits,  for  at  all  the  places  we  had  visited 
before  we  had  heard  of  nothing  but  absurd  prices,  without  seeing  anything  we  cared  to 
have.  Noic  we  are  able  to  buy  a  pair  of  Chelsea  butter-boats,  covers  and  stands,  very- 
perfect  and  unusual,  £3."  "  Two  small  butter-tubs,  covers  and  plates,  enamel'd  in  flowers  " 
appear  as  lot  30  in  the  Sale  Catalogue  for  .March  31st,  1756,  see  Read,  Chelsea  Porcelain, 
p.   10. 


111.— CHEl.SEA-DERBV. 


THE  porcelain  made  by  William  Duesbury  between  1770  and  1784, 
during  which  period  he  carried  on  the  factories  at  Chelsea 
and  Derby  concurrently,  is  known  as  "  Chelsea-Derby "  porce- 
lain. Generally  it  is  not  possible  to  distinguish  between  the  produc- 
tions of  the  two  places  unless  a  distinctive  mark  occurs.  The 
customary  mark  of  the  joint  factories  consists  of  a  D  intersected 
by  an  anchor  in  gold,  but  the  simple  gold  anchor  mark  continued 
in  use  for  some  time  after  1770,  and  pieces  bearing  it  may  safely  be 
ascribed  to  the  Chelsea  works. ^  Certain  other  pieces  in  the  decoration 
of  which  Chelsea  traditions  are  apparent  may  also  be  assigned  with 
probability  to  the  same  place  of  origin.-  Specimens  bearing  the  dis- 
tinctive marks  of  the  Derby  factory  will  be  described  in  the  next 
division.^ 

Chelsea-Derby  porcelain  is  characterised  by  sobriety  of  modelling, 
somewhat  subdued  colouring,  and  the  pseudo-classical  forms  and  motives 
of  decoration  of  the  Louis  XVI.  style.  An  overglaze  blue  enamel  in 
imitation  of  the  bleu  de  roi  of  Sevres  *  now  takes  the  place  of  the  earlier 
underglaze  mazarine-blue.  The  statuettes  of  this  period  are  usually 
only  slightly  tinted  w'ith  washes  of  pale  colour  ;  figures  in  unglazed 
biscuit  porcelain  also  began  to  be  made.^  They  are  generally  charac- 
terised by  an  air  of  sentimentalism  and  affected  simplicity,  traceable 
to  the  influence  of  Boucher  and  his  school,  in  striking  contrast  with 
the  vigorous  abandon  of  man\-  of  the  earlier  Chelsea  models.  The  mark 
"  No."  followed  by  a  numeral,  found  incised  in  the  paste  under  the 
base  of  some  of  the  figures,''  refers  to  the  number  of  the  model  in 
the  price-list  of  the  Derby  factory,  and  shows  that  such  pieces  were 
probably  made  at  that  place.  The  models  were  often  made  in  several 
sizes,  and  references  to  these  are  also  sometimes  found  incised  under 
the  fiscuresJ 


1  Nos.  392,  394.  -  Nos.  180,  364,  365,  456.  *  See  p.  76. 

'  Nos.  435,  438,  443,  etc.  '■'  Nos.  413,  419.  429. 

"  Nos.  415-418,  420,  424,  429.  '  No.  421. 

I '.12511 


66  CHKLSEA-DKl^BV. 

§   I.     STATUETTES  AND  BUSTS,  COLOURED. 
Nos.  409-434. 

These  iire  all  decorated  in  enamel  colours,  generally  somewhat  pale 
in  tone,  and  gold,  except  Nos.  180,  203,  414,  433  and  434,  in  which  the 
gilding  is  absent. 

409.  TiMK  CLIPPING  THE  WiN'GS  OF  LovE,  from  a  painting  by  Sir  Anthony  V'andyke, 
formerly  in  the  collection  of  the  Duke  of  Marlborough  at  Blenheim,  of  wfiich 
a  mezzotint  by  Charles  Phillips,  dated  1772,  accompanies  the  Collection, 
No.  1819.     (Pl.\te  40.) 

Time  is  seated  on  a  pedestal  of  masonry  with  flowered  drapery  thrown  round  his  waist,  holding 

Cupid  on  his  knee.     .\t  his  feet,  on  the  scrolled  base,  are  a  scythe,  hour-glass,  crown,  sceptre, 

terrestrial  globe,  and  skull,  and  Cupid's  quiver.     H.  8J  in. 
In  the  catalogue  of  the  first  sale  of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories,  April  17th,  1871, 

lot   25,   is   "  A  curious   figure   of  Time  clipping   of   Cupid's  wing,   finely  enamel'd,  and 

ornamented  with  burnish'd  gold,  61.  "  ;  see  Nightingale,  p.  22. 
Bought  at  Hamburg  on  October  14th,  1880  ;   see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  306,  "  At  Lissauer's  acquired  a 

lovely  Chelsea  bird  and  a  Chelsea-Derby  figure  of  '  Time  clipping  Love's  wings.'  all  for  £^." 

179.  Mercury.     (Plate  40.) 

He  has  flowered  drapery  thrown  loosely  round  him  and  a  winged  cap,  and  stands  with  a  purse 
in  his  right  hand  and  a  caduceus  in  his  left.  At  his  feet  are  a  money-bag  and  a  bale  of 
merchandise  among  clouds  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base.     H.   134:  in. 

180.  B.\ccHLS   WITH   .\   Youthful    Satyr,   emblematic    of   Autumn,  one    of   a   set   of 

the  Four  Seasons,  copied  from  a  Meissen  figure,  modelled,  probably  by  Johann 
Friedrich  Eberlein,  about  1740.     (Plate  40.) 

Bacchus  stands  by  a  tree-stump,  from  which  springs  a  vine  with  bunches  of  green  and 
purple  grapes  and  foliage ;  the  branches  of  the  vine  are  wreathed  about  his  naked  body, 
and  with  fiis  left  hand  he  holds  a  bunch  of  grapes  above  his  mouth.  The  satyr  is  seated 
behind  him  on  a  barrel,  with  a  cup  held  to  his  lips.  The  whole  is  supported  on  a 
rococo-scrolled  base.  The  colouring  is  slight, — pale  tinting  of  the  flesh  and  ha-r,  light 
purple  and  green  for  the  grapes  and  leaves,  and  touches  of  crimson  and  turquoise-blue 
on  the  pedestal.     H.   lOj  in. 

This  figure  was  probably  made  at  Chelsea  during  the  Chelsea-Derby  period.  .•\  complete  .set 
in  Chelsea  porcelain  was  formerly  in  the  Emden  Collection,  Hamburg  ;  see  Sammlung 
Hermann  Emden,  Hamburg,  Erster  Teil,  Berlin,  igo8,  pi.  67,  No.  815.  Compare  also 
Doenges,  A/eiss«fKPi))'£t'//a)j,  pi.  xviii :  Fischer,  Sammlung  Alt-Meissner  l^orzellan,  pi.  xxxv.. 
No.   qog ;    Kunst-Sammlung  F.  von  Purpart,  Berlin,  191 2,  pi.  30,  No.  65g. 

Bought  at  Rotterdam  on  October  15th,  1873;  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  231,  "  Pluyne's  had  a  grand 
Chelsea  figure  of  Autumn,  covered  with  grapes,  wanting  a  hand,  which  we  hope  to  get 
restored  in  china  for  us  at  Minton's  works,  and  for  which  we  gave  £8 " ;  also  ii., 
illustration  facing  p.  324. 

205.  David  Garrick  (b.  171 7,  d.  1799)  in  the  character  of  King  Richard  III., 
modelled  from  an  engraving  by  J.  Dixon  published  in  1772,  after  the  painting 
by  Nathaniel  Dance  exhibited  in  the  Royal  Academy  in  1771.      (Plate  40.) 

He  wears  a  red  ermine-lined  sleeveless  robe  over  a  breast-plate,  doublet  and  hose,  and  stands 
in  a  striding  attitude  beside  a  tree-stump  on  an  oblong  base,  on  which  are  applied 
flowers  and  foliage;  his  plumed  hat  lies  at  his  feet.     H.   11}  in. 

In  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  February  qth,  1773,  is 
"  .\  fine  figure  of  Garrick  in  the  character  of  Richard  the  Third,  in  biscuit,  i/.  los.  The 
figure  is  No.  21  in  the  Derby  price  list  of  groups  and  figures,  where  it  is  attributed  to  John 
Bacon,  R.A.  (b.  1740,  d.  1799).     See  Nightingale,  Contributions,  p.  400  :  Haslem,  pp.  152, 1 17 


CHELSEA-DERBY.  G7 

410.  Pair  of  Statuettes,  Discretion,  symbolised  by  Cupid,  and  Prudence,  as  a  little 

girl.     (Plate  41.) 

Both  figures  are  nude  except  for  a  loose  scarf  thrown  round  the  body  ;  they  stand  each  on 
a  rocky  mound  covered  with  flowering  plants  and  shells,  beside  an  urn  hung  with 
festoons  supported  on  a  square  pedestal.  Cupid  has  his  quiver  slung  on  his  left  shoulder 
and  is  raising  his  forefinger  to  his  lips.  Prudence  holds  a  snake  in  her  right  hand  and 
a  mirror  (of  which  only  the  handle  remains)  in  her  left.     H.  8  in.,  8|  in.  respectively. 

These  figures  are  probably  similar  to  those  described  in  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  united 
Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  April  17th,  1771  (lot  61),  as  "A  pair  of  figures,  Pru- 
dence and  Discretion,  each  a  curious  antique  urn,  on  pedestals,  in  festoons  of  chased  gold, 
and  highly  finish'd  in  burnish'd  gold  5/.  2s.  6d.  "  ;  see  Nightingale,  p.  ig.  In  the  British 
Museum  is  a  figure  from  the  same  model  as  the  "  Prudence  "  ;  see  Hobson,  Catalogue,  p.  62, 
No.  II.  305,  where  it  is  suggested  that  the  figure  may  represent  Hygieia,  and  Nos.  412  and 
413  in  the  Schreiber  Collection  are  cited  for  comparison  as  works  of  the  same  modeller. 

411.  Group  of  cupids,  emblematic  of  Astronomy  and  Geometry.    1773.    (Plate  41.) 

Two  cupids,  one  of  them  seated  on  a  rock  looking  through  a  telescope,  the  other  standing 
and  measuring  with  compasses  on  a  sheet  of  paper,  which  he  holds  spread  out  on  a 
terrestrial  globe.  Supported  on  an  oblong  pedestal  with  incurved  sides,  decorated  with 
scrolled  masks  and  gilt  wreaths.     H.  7  in.,  L.  of  pedestal,  4];  in. 

This  group  forms  a  set  of  three  with  Nos.  427,  427a.  '•  Science  groups  "  are  mentioned  in 
the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  April  17th,  17S0;  see 
Nightingale,  p.  58.  A  porcelain  group  adapted  from  the  same  original,  probably  a  Meissen 
model,  was  produced  about  1770  at  \'ienna  ;  see  Folnesics,  Sammlung  Karl  Mayer,  pi.  Ix.wii. 

412.  Group.     Three  children,  representing  Minerva  crowning  Constancy  and  Hercules 

killing  the  Hydra. 

The  figures  are  grouped  round  an  obelisk,  which  is  surmounted  by  a  gilt  ball  and  overgrown 
with  ivy  ;  it  rests  on  the  top  of  a  rocky  mound  covered  with  flowering  plants.  Beside 
the  figure  of  Constancy  are  a  broken  column  and  a  burning  brazier.     H.  12J  in. 

In  the  catalogue  of  the  first  sale  of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories,  April  i8th,  1771, 
lot  39,  is  "  A  curious  group  of  three  figures,  richly  enamel'd,  Minerva  crowning  Constancy, 
and  Hercules  killing  the  Hydra,  with  a  pyramid  in  the  middle,  highly  finish'd  in  burnish'd 
gold,  6/." ;   see  Nightingale,  p.  23.   Compare  also  note  on  No.  413. 

[413.  Group,  biscuit  porcelain,  see  p.  71.] 

414.  Triton,  copied  from  one  of  Wedgwood's  models.    Mark,  "G  "  incised.    (Plate  40.) 

The  Triton  holds  a  cornucopia   and  is   supported   on  a    rockv  base  covered  with  weeds   and 

shells.     H.  8|  in. 
See  Meteyard,  Josiah   Wedgwood,   vol.  ii.,  p.  218,  where  an   engraving  is  given  from  a  drawing  in 

one  of  Wedgwood's  order  books. 

415.  Group.     A  boy  and  girl  dancing.     Mark,  46  incised.     (Plate  41.) 

Tlie  figures  are  dancing  with  hands  clasped  behind  their  backs.  The  boy  wears  a  black  hat 
with  light  blue  ribbon,  white  jacket  and  waistcoat,  and  yellow  breeches,  the  girl  a  white 
dress  with  pink  lacing  in  front,  a  white  apron,  striped  yellow  petticoat,  and  in  her  hair 
coloured  ribbons.     H.  6}  in. 

This  group  is  an  adaptation  of  a  model  by  Falconet,  entitled  La  Danse  allemande,  produced 
in  1765  at  Sevres;  see  Lechevallier-Chevignard,  Si-t't-m,  illustration,  p.  27,  Bourgeois  and 
Lechevallier-Chevignard,  Le  Biscuit  de  Sevres,  pi.  11,  no.  170. 

203.  Group.     "The  Tithe  Pig."'     (Plate  41.) 

The  group  represents  a  farmer's  wife  offering  her  baby  to  a  clergyman  in  payment  of  tithe, 
instead  of  a  pig  which  is  held  by  her  husband  under  his  left  arm  The  figures  are 
dressed  in  costume  of  tlie  period  and  stand  under  the  shadow  of  a  flowering  tree;  on  the 
ground  are  a  basket  of  eggs  and  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  6J  in.,  W.  of  base,  4  J  in. 

Bought  at  Brussels  on  September  20th,  1882,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  384,  ".  .  .  our  best  find  was 
at  Craenen's,  where  we  met  with  an  admirable  group  of  the  Tilhe  pig  in  good  old  Chelsea," 

E  2 


68  CHELSKA-DERBY. 

416.  Pair  of  Figures.      A  boy  with    a   dog,    and  a  girl    with  a  cat.      Mark,  on    the 

boy  "N  49"  and  "  G,"  on  the  girl  "No.  49  "  and  "  M,"  incised.     (Plate  41.) 

The  boy  is  dressed  in  fanciful  costume  and  kneels  on  a  rocky  mound  with  his  arms  round  a 

dog,  which  has  a  cocked  hat  on  its  head.     The  girl  wears  a  blue  bodice,  red-lined  black 

cape,  flowered   skirt,    and  white  apron,  and  hugs  a  cat  with  a  linen  cap  over  its  head. 

H.  53  in.,  5§  in.  respectively. 
In  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  March   29th,   1773,  one 

lot   is  "  A  pair  of   laughing  figures  enamelled  white  and  gold,  dressing  a  macarony  dog 

and  cat,   17s."     See  Nightingale,  p.  45. 
Bought  in  Paris  on  April  iSth,  1873  ;  see  Journals,  i.,  p.   184,     ".     .     .     found  at  Mme.  Flaudin's 

a  lovely  pair  of  Derby-Chelsea    figures  ;    Boy  with  dog  and  Girl  with    cat.      They  were 

very  dear,  but  quite  irresistible  at  £n-" 
Church,  figs.  22,  23  ;    Dillon,  Porcelain,  1910,  fig.   274. 

417.  Group,  one  of  a  pair,  emblematic  of    Summer  and  Autumn.      Mark,  "  No.  68," 

incised.     (Plate  41.) 

Summer  is  symbolised  by  a  girl  standing  with  a  sickle  and  a  sheaf  of  corn,  and  .Autumn 
by  a  boy  seated  on  a  barrel  holding  bunches  of  grapes.  The  former  wears  a  pink-lined 
white  hat,  a  light  blue  laced  bodice,  and  a  white  apron  over  a  striped  skirt ;  the  latter, 
a  pink  coat,  flowered  waistcoat  and  yellow  breeches ;  he  holds  his  black  hat  full  of  grapes 
in  his  right  hand.  The  figures  are  placed  on  a  green  mound  with  a  tree-trunk  beside 
them.     H.  8J  in. 

418.  Aesculapius.     Mark,  "  No.  gg,"  incised.     (Plate  41.) 

Bearded  standing  figure,  clad  in  a  pink-lined  himation  thrown  over  the  right  shoulder,  leaning 
on  a  long  club  or  staff  and  holding  a  scroll  in  the  right  hand.     Square  base.     H.  6|  in. 

[419.  Statuette,  biscuit  porcelain,  see  p.  71.] 

420.  Pair  of  Groups,    copied    from    two    Sevres    groups    known   respectively  as  "  La 

Bergere  des  Alpes"  and  "  L' Oracle  ou  le  Noeud  de  Cravate,"  modelled  in  1766 
by  Etienne  Falconet  after  designs  by  Frangois  Boucher.  Mark,  on  one 
"  No.  256,"  on  the  other  "  No.  255,"  and  on  both  a  cross,  incised.     (Plate  42.) 

The  first  group  consists  of  a  youth  reclining  at  the  feet  of  a  girl,  whose  hand  he  holds ;  she  is 
seated  on  a  rocky  mound  by  a  tree  and  has  a  lamb  lying  beside  her.  The  youth  wears 
a  pink  short-sleeved  jacket  over  a  flowered  waistcoat,  light  blue  sash  and  yellow  breeches, 
the  girl  a  light  blue  bodice  laced  in  front  and  a  skirt  of  the  same  colour  over  a  flowered 
petticoat.  The  second  group  represents  a  girl,  also  seated  on  a  rock  beside  a  tree,  tying 
a  kerchief  round  the  neck  of  a  youth  who  kneels  with  clasped  hands  before  her ;  by  her 
side  is  a  basket  of  fruit.  Except  for  small  details,  the  figures  are  similarly  attired  to 
those  in  the   first  group.     H.   12  in.,   ii|  in.  respectively. 

The  maqueltcs  of  the  original  groups  are  preserved  in  the  Musee  Ceramiqueat  Sevres ;  compare 
Bourgeois  and  Lechevallier-Chevignard,  Le  Biscuit  de  Sevres,  pi.  9,  Xos.   no,  481. 

Bought  at  Amsterdam  on  .-August  17th,  1869:  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  33,  "Our  ne.\t  best  haul  was 
with  Speyers,  St.  Anthony,  Breestraat ;  from  him  we  made  several  purchases,  some  of 
thorn  likely  to  prove  good.  Two  groups  of  Derby-Chelsea  figures,  man  and  girl^  in 
bocage  of  leaves,  good  condition,  only  two  fingers  wanting,  '  Proposal '  and  '  Acceptance  '  (?) 
£iS"  ;  also  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.   466. 

Chaffers,  fig.  428. 

421.  Boy,  emblematic  of  Winter.     Mark,  "  P) "  and  "small,"  incised. 

He  wears  a  red  fur-lined  jacket  over  a  blue  waistcoat,  yellow  breeches  and  fur-lined  boots,  and 
is  stooping  to  lift  a  faggot  on  to  his  shoulders  ;  he  is  resting  his  right  knee  on  a  small  mound 
on  which  grows  a  holly-bush.     Circular  base.     H.  6|  in. 


CHELSEA-DERBV.  69 

A  complete  set  of  the  figures  to  which  this  model  belongs  is  exhibited  in  the  Museum  in  the 

bequest  of  Capt.  H.  B.  Murray,  Nos.  C.  2583-2586 — 1910. 
Bought  at  Brussels  on  October  14th,  1874,  stv /oui-Ha/s,  i.,  p.  321,  "  Xext  to   Handelaar's     .     .     . 

he  had  a  small  Chelsea-Derby  figure  of  Winter  (the  boy  carrying  sticks)  of  beautiful  quality, 

which  we  bought  for  £■;." 

422.  Cupid    with   a    dog,    painted    in    colours   and    decorated    with    gilding.      Mark, 

"No.  2i3g,"  incised. 

Cupid  has  a  gilt  hunting-horn  slung  over  his  right  shoulder  and  a  spotted  scarf  thrown  about 
him ;  he  reclines  against  a  tree  on  a  flower-covered  mound  caressing  the  dog,  a  black  and 
white  terrier,  which  is  licking  his  chin.     H.  4!  in. 

423.  Group,    copied    from    an    engraving    by    Jacques    Philippe    Le    Bas,    after     a 

painting  by  Frangois  Boucher,  dated  174.7,  now  in  the  National  Museum, 
Stockholm,  entitled  "  Peiisent-ils  au  raisin?"  An  impression  of  the  engraving 
accompanies  the  Collection,  No.   1820.     (Pl.\te  43. j 

A  youth  and  a  girl  seated  with  a  lamb  between  them  on  a  rocky  mound,  offering  each  other 
grapes.  The  youth  is  attired  in  a  short-sleeved  coat  over  a  waistcoat  with  a  sash,  and  knee- 
breeches,  the  girl  in  a  laced  bodice  and  full  skirt  ;  both  are  bare-legged.  The  girl  has 
grapes  in  her  lap  and  in  a  basket  on  her  right  arm.  Several  bunches  are  strewn  on  the 
ground  and  in  the  youth's  hat  which  lies  at  his  feet.  The  colouring  of  the  group  is  slight, 
crimson  and  pale  green  for  the  grapes  and  foliage,  black  and  yellow  for  bows  on  the  costumes, 
and  tinting  in  natural  colours  for  the  hair  and  flesh.  The  costumes  are  white  with  gilt 
lines.     H.  8|  in.,  W.  7J  in. 

Solon,  pi.  xi. ;  Journals,  ii.,  illustrations  facing  pp.  324,  4(^6.  Compare  also  Michel,  Fraiifois 
Boucher,  Catalogue  No.   1554. 

424.  Group,    emblematic   of    Music.      Mark,  "No.    217"  and  "  B,"    incised    (No.  28). 

(Pl.\te  40.) 

The  group  consists  of  a  standing  female  figure  in  llowered  classical  robe,  playing  a  llute  beside  a 
truncated  column,  and  of  two  boys,  naked  except  for  scarves  of  coloured  drapery,  one  of 
whom  stands  hojding  up  a  roll  of  music,  while  the  other  sits  with  a  violin  at  the  foot  of  the 
column.  On  the  top  of  the  latter  are  a  tambourine,  books  and  a  sheet  of  music;  other 
instruments  and  a  book  lie  on  the  flower-covered  mound  which  forms  the  base.  H.  g^  in., 
W.  of  base,  5  in. 

Probably  similar  to  the  "  large  music  group  "  which  figures  in  the  Sale  Catalogue  of  the  united 
Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  May  5th,  1778;  see  Nightingale,  p.  52. 

425.  P.MR  OF  St.\tuettes  of  Musicians.     (Pi,.\te  41.) 

A  gentleman  and  lady  playing  a  flute  and  a  lute  respectively,  each  seated  on  a  high-backed  chair 
and  supported  on  an  eight-sided  base.  The  gentleman  wears  a  pink-lined  white  coat, 
Howered  waistcoat  and  lavender-coloured  breeches;  his  hat  hangs  on  one  corner  of  his 
chair,  and  beneath  it  is  an  instrument-case  with  books  piled  upon  it.  The  lady  is  attireil 
in  a  flowered  dress,  and  has  a  spaniel  on  her  lap.  Underneath  her  chair  is  a  second  lute 
with  books  piled  upon  it.     H.  6{  in.,  6ij  in.  respectively;  each,  VV.  of  base,  3,[  in. 

Bought  in  Paris  on  November  nth,  1880,  sff  yunma/s,  ii.,  pp.  322,  323,  "  .  .  .  .  at  Jurnel's, 
we  saw  a  lovely  pair  of  little  Chelsea-Derby  figures,  seated,  and  playing  on  instruments, 
which  were  offered  to  us  as  '  Saxe '  ....  We  called  at  Jurnel's  and  concluded  for  the 
Chelsea-Derby  figures  at  £g." 

426.  Cupid  in  a  large  wig  playing  on  a  pipe.     (Pl.\te  41.) 

Standing  figure,  wearing  only  white  frills  on  the  wrists  and  a  cloth  round   the  waist,  supported 

by  a  green  stump  on  a  gilt  scrolled  base.     H.  4J  in. 
Probably   from   a   Chelsea   model.     Frequent  notices  occur   in   the    Chelsea   Sale    Catalogue 

for   1756  of  "  Cupids,  representing  Inve  in  disguise,  playing  on  different  sorts  of  music,  for  a 

desart  "  ;  see  Read,  Chelsea  Porcelain,  p.  n. 


70  CilJiLSEA-DERBY. 

427.   Group  of  Cupids,  emblematic  of  Commerce.     1773.     (Pi,.\ti;  41. j 

Two  cupids  draped  with  scarves,  one  of  them  taking  money  out  of  a  bag,  the  other  seated  on  tlie 
edge  of  a  bale  of  goods  making  notes  on  a  slate.  Supported  on  a  pedestal  similar  to 
that  of  No.  411,  with  which  group  this  and  No.  427a  form  a  set  of  three.  H.  7  in., 
L.  of  pedestal,  4 J  in. 

427a    Group    of    Cupids,  emblematic    of    Arithmetic,    copied    from  a  Meissen    group, 
modelled  about  1770  by  Michel  Victor  .-\cier.     Dated  1773.     (Pl.\te  41.) 

Two  cupids  draped  with  scarves,  one  of  them  writing  in  a  ledger,  which  is  supported  by  the 
other  who  kneels  on  a  pile  of  books  and  holds  an  inkpot  in  his  left  hand.  Two  of  the 
books  have  inscriptions,  of  which  the  following  is  legible:  "  Apr.  6th,  1773.  Put  to  That 
£1  y.  od."  Supported  on  a  pedestal  similar  to  that  of  No.  411,  with  which  group  this 
and  No.  427  form  a  set  of  three.     H.  7  in.,  L.  of  pedestal,  4}  in. 

Compare  .Mbum  of  the  Royal  Saxon  Porcelain  Manufactory,  No.  C  36;  also  Fesliiv 
Publication,  p.  68. 

[428    P.A.IR  OF  Groups,  Sevres  biscuit  porcelain,  see  p.   i6g.] 
[429    Statuette,  Chel^'ea- Derby  biscuit  porcelain,  see  p.  71.] 

430.  P.MR    OF    Busts,    emblematic  of  Spring  and  Winter  (the  latter  adapted  from  a 

Meissen  model).     Mark  "  G,"  accompanied  on  the  "Spring"  by  other  indistinct 
letters,  incised.     (Plate  41.) 

Spring  is  represented  by  a  girl  with  a  wreath  of  flowers  in  her  hair  and  a  flowered  robe  thrown 
round  her  shoulders,  Winter  by  a  bearded  man  wearing  a  fur-lined  pink  cloak  over  his 
head  ;  both  busts  are  supported  on  an  eight-sided  pedestal.     H.  3I  in.,  3?  in.  respectively. 

431.  Bust  of   Alexander    Pope  (b.    1688,  d.   1774),    adapted  from  a  portrait  painted 

in  1716  by  Sir  Godfrey  Kneller  and  engraved  in  1717  by  J.  Smith.     (Plate  41.) 

Wearing  a  red  cap  and  a  blue  coat,  over  which  is  thrown  a  mauve  cloak.  Oblong  pedestal  with 
bowed  front.     H.  6f  in. 

Bought  at  Utrecht  on  October  4th,  iS6g,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  45  "  ....  we  returned  by  the 
train  to  Utrecht  ....  Went  by  appointment  to  the  Jew  ....  we  managed  to 
buy     ....     a  bust  of  Pope,  soft  paste,  £1." 

432.  Bust    of   Jean-Jacques    Rousseau    (b.  1712,   d.   1778),  adapted   from   a  portrait 

painted    by  J.  H.  Taraval,    based    on  a  bronze    medal,    dated    1761,  by    Frans 
Gabriel  Leclerc,  and  engraved  in   1766  by  C.  H.  Watelet.     (Plate  41.) 

The  philosopher  is  dressed  in  his  .Armenian  costume,  consisting  of  a  fur-cap  and  fur-lined  brown 

caftan,  over  which  is  thrown  a  mauve  cloak.     Circular  pedestal.     H.  6j  in. 
Compare  P<uftenoir,  Portraits  de  J. -J.  Rousseau,  pi.  18,  pi.  20,  pi.  118. 

433.  Figure  of  a  Pointer.     (Plate  41.) 

The  dog  is  coloured  after  nature  and  stands  supported  by  a  tree-trunk  on  a  base  covered  with 
flowering  plants.     H.  4^^  in.,  L.  5',   in. 

434.  Figure  of  a  Squirrel.     Mark,  "O"  and  a  stroke  incised. 

'1  he  squirrel  is  coloured  after  nature,  has  a  black  collar,  and  is  seated  on  a  green  mound  eating  a 
nut.     H.  3^  in. 


CHELSEA-DERBY.  71 

§  2.     FIGURES   IN   UNGLAZED   BISCUIT   PORCELAIN. 
Nos.  413,  419,  429. 

The  first  two  belong  to  the  Chelsea-Derby  period,  1 770-1784. 
Nos.  419  and  429  were  probably  made  at  Derby,  the  latter  perhaps 
somewhat  later  than  1784  (compare  p.  77). 

413.  Group.     Three  children,  representing  Minerva  crowning  Constancy  and  Hercules 
killing  the  Hydra.     (Plate  44.) 

The  figures,  which  are  from  the  same  models  as  those  composing  the  coloured  group  No.  412, 

are  grouped  round  a  tree  on  the  top  of  a  rocky  mound  covered  with   flowering  plants! 

Beside  the  figure  of  Constancy  is  a  broken  column.     H.  i2|  in. 
In  the  catalogue  of  the  first  sale  of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories,  .April  i8th,  1771, 

lot   47    is :    "  A   group   of   three   figures.    Minerva    crowning    Constancy  with    laurel,  and 

Hercules  kiling  (sic)  the  Hydra,  very  curiously  finish'd  in  biscuit,  j/.  15s.'''     See  Nightingale, 

p.  21." 
Bought  at  the  Hague  on  October  ist,  1873,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  229,  "    .     .     .     .     found  in  a 

shop  hitherto   unknown   to    us,   Dirksen,   a  splendid   group   in   Derby   biscuit   of    Cupid 

killing  the  Hydra  (a  la  Hercules),  of  the  same  model  as  the  coloured'  Derby  china  group 

we  already  possess." 

419.  Plenty.     Mark,  "  No.  163,"  incised.     (Pl.\te  41.) 

Standing  figure  in  classical  drapery,  tiara  and  sandals,  holding  in  her  left  hand  a  cornucopia 
full  of  fruit  and  in  her  right  a  bunch  of  leaves.     Square  base.     H.  gf  in. 

429.  Cupid  as  Sportsman-.     Mark,  233  incised.     (Plate  41.) 

Cupid  holds  a  dog  in  leash  with  his  left  hand  and  carries  a  gun  under  his  right  arm.  He 
wears  a  wide-brimmed  hat  and  has  a  game-bag  slung  over  his  left  shoulder.  He  stands 
on  a  rocky  mound  with  a  tree-trunk  by  his  side.     H.  3f  in. 

§  3-     VASES  AND   ORNAMENTAL   PIECES. 
Nos.  435-442. 

These  pieces  are  variously  decorated  with  overglaze  enamel  colours 
and  gilding. 

435.  Vase,    painted    in    blue    {bleu   de    roi)   and    gilt.      The    form    is   adapted    from    a 

Sevres    model    known'  as  the  "  lose  flacon  a  mouchoirs."     Mark,  "  G8  "  incised 
(Plate  48.) 

Hemispherical  body,  hung  with  festoons  of  white  draperv  in  relief  on  a  blue  ground  ;  the 
neck  contracts  upwards  and  is  decorated  with  spira'l  fluting  coloured  blue,  and  with 
gilt  festoons  of  foliage  hanging  from  lions'  masks  in  relief.  Beaded  rim,  spreading  foot 
resting  on  an  eight-sided  plinth.     H.  8f  in.,  diam.  4f  in. 

Compare  Troude,  Clwix  de  Modeles,  pi.  95. 

436.  P.MR  OF  Vases,  painted  in  turquoise-blue  and  gilt.    Mark,  20  incised.     (Plate  48.) 

Short  expanding  fluted  neck,  truncated  oviform  body  with  urn-shaped  foot  resting  on  a 
square  plinth,  two  scrolled  loop  handles  rising  above  the  rim.  The  upper  part  of  the 
foot  is  gadrooned.  The  body  is  decorated  with  moulded  vertical  bands,  alternately  white 
and  blue  ;  enclosed  by  the  blue  bands,  which  are  concave,  are  garlands  of  laurel  hanging 
from  the  shoulder.     Each,  H.  9  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 


72  CHELSEA-DERBV. 

437.  \'ase,  painted  in  turquoise-blue.     (Plate  45.) 

Ovoid  body,  decorated  round  the  shoulder  on  either  side  with  a  grotesque  mask  flanked  by 
lions  above  a  band  of  conventional  ornament  below  which  are  rosettes  and  festoons  of 
foliage.  The  upper  part  and  the  short  expanding  neck  are  spirally  fluted.  The  vase  has 
two  loop  handles,  each  in  the  form  of  a  dolphin  issuing  from  a  lion's  leg  which  rests  on  a 
sheep's  head,  and  a  high  foot  decorated  with  acanthus-foliage,  supported  on  a  square  plinth. 
The    decoration  is  in  relief,  reserved  in  white  on  a  blue  ground.     H.  15I  in.,  W.  g  in. 

Tlie  vase  has  become  misshapen  in  the  kiln  and  appears  to  be  a  trial  piece,  the  decoration 
of  which  has  never  been  completed. 

242.  Pair  of  Vases  with  Covers,  decorated  with  applied  flowers  and   gilding  and 
painted  in  bluish-green  and  crimson.     (Plate  45.) 

I'ear-shaped  body,  expanding  neck  and  spreading  foot,  decorated  with  white  hawthorn-blossom 
applied  on  a  greenish-blue  ground  ;  two  scrolled  loop  handles.  The  domed  covers  are  sur- 
mounted by  a  rose  painted  crimson  with  white  stem  and  leaves.   Kach,  H.  8g  in.,  W.  6j  in. 

A  similar  vase  in  the  British  Museum  bears  the  Chelsea-Derby  mark. 

258.  Bottle  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  the  form  of  an  ac.e  of  clubs, 
with  the  Queen  and  Knave  of  clubs  depicted    in  a   medallion    on    either   side. 

(Plate  45T) 

The  ace  is  coloured  turquoise-blue  and  is  surmounted  by  two  scrolled  handles,  rising  from 
gilt  satyr  masks,  and  a  tubular  neck  ;  it  is  supported  on  a  high  circular  foot  with  claret- 
coloured  ground,  decorated  with  rams'  heads  in  relief,  surmounting  consoles,  the  plinths 
of  which  project  from  the  foot.     H.  yf  in.,  W.  4J   in. 

Probably  similar  to  the  "  Pair  of  card  toilet-bottles  (spade)  enamelled  with  fine  pea-green 
and  crimson,  and  richly  finished  with  gold,  3/.  is.,"  occurring  in  the  Sale  Catalogue  of 
the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  for  February  9th  and  loth,  1773  ;  see  Nightingale,  p.  38. 

438.  Punch-bowl,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Inside  are    the   arms  of   the  Coopers' 

Companv  of  London,  with  crest,  supporters  and  the  motto  "  LIVE  AS 
BRETHREN  " ;  outside  are  depicted  coopers  at  work  on  the  banks  of  a 
river  with  shipping.  On  the  bottom  are  the  initials  "  EED "  in  monogram 
and  the  date  1779.     Mark,  an  anchor  in   gold.     (Plate  46.) 

Round  the  rim  outside  are  two  interlaced  foliated  stems  in  gold  on  a  broad  bleu  de  roi 
band ;  inside  is  a  narrow  conventional  border,  from  which  hang  festoons  of  foliage  in 
purple.  H.  4J  in.,  diam.  lo-J  in. 
Church,  fig.  12.  This  piece,  which  was  doubtless  made  at  Chelsea,  suggests  that  the  earlier  Chel- 
sea manner  was  abandoned  soon  after  the  change  of  management  in  1770.  A  search  in  the 
records  of  the  Coopers'  Company  has  failed  to  throw  light  on  the  significance  of  the  initials. 

[439.  Bowl,  Chelsea  porcelain,  see  p.  56.] 

440.  Basket,  painted  in  colours  with  gilding.     Mark,  "D"  intersected  by  an  anchor, 
in  gold. 

Oval,  w^ith  pierced  openwork  sides,  scalloped  edge,  and  a  double  twisted  loop  handle  at 
either  end.  .'\t  the  points  of  intersection  and  the  attachments  of  the  handles  are  applied 
flowers.  Inside  are  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  painted  in  natural  colours.  H.  3I  in., 
L.  9I  in.,  W.  7I   in. 

44L  Toilet  Set,  consisting  of  a    box  and    cover  and  two  pomade-pots  with  covers, 
painted  in  colours  and  gilt. 

The  box  is  oblong,  with  slightly  domed  cover,  surmounted  by  a  pair  of  doves  with  a  quiver 
full  of  arrows  between  them.  The  pomade-pots  are  cylindrical ;  on  the  cover  of  eacli  i> 
a  reclining  figure  of  a  boy,  caressing  a  lamb  crowned  with  a  garland  of  flowers.  The 
box  and  the  pomade-pots'  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  green.  Box,  H.  3  in., 
I,,  3I  in.,  W.  2|  in.;  pomade-pots,  each,  H.  2J  in.,  diam.  ij  in. 
Bought  in  London  on  August  30th,  1884;  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  433.  In  the  sale  catalogues 
of  the  united  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories  there  is  frequent  mention  of  "  dressing-boxes  " 
and  "  pomatum  pots." 


CHELSEA-DERBY. 


73 


442.  Pair  of  Buckles,  painted  in  blue  and  gilt. 

Of  arched  oblong  form,  painted  with  a  pattern  of  lozenges   alternating  with  dots,   in  blue 

between  two  bands  of  gilding.     The  mounts  are  of  steel.     Each.  2^  in.  by  2f\  in. 
Acquired   in   Paris  on   December  17th,   1876;  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  502,  "We   have   acquired   a 

lovely  pair  of  shoe-buckles  in  white  china  with  blue  pattern  and  gold— unique — C.  S. 

thinks  them  Derby-Chelsea." 


§  4-  PIECES  FOR  DOMESTIC  USE. 

Nos.  443-458. 

All    these  pieces    are  decorated    in    enamel  colours    and    gold,  with 
the  exception  of  No.  365,  which  has  no  gilding. 

443.  Sl-g.\r-b.\si\  -vnd  Cover.     Mark,  "D"  intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold. 

Both  pieces  are  reeded  and  painted  with  bouquets  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  Round  the 
edges,  which  are  scalloped,  is  a  border  of  foliage  on  a  wavy  stem  in  gold  on  a  bleu  de  roi 
band.     H.  jf  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

444.  P.\iR  OF  Mugs.     Mark,  "D"  intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold.    (Pl.\te  45.) 

Each  has  a  globular  body,  wide  reeded  cylindrical  neck,  and  loop  handle.  Round  the  shoulder 
is  a  border  of  gilt  conventional  ornament  on  a  scalloped  blue  band ;  round  the  rim  is 
a  plain  blue  band  edged  with  gold.  The  remaining  surface  is  painted  with  bouquets  and 
sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.     Each,  H.  3I  in.,  diam.  3  in, 

445.  Dish  .\nd  Two  Pi..\tes.     Mark,  "  D  "  intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold  (No.  26). 

(Pl.\te  49.) 

The  dish  is  heart-shaped,  Ihe  plates  have  a  wavy  edge.  In  the  centre  is  a  classical  vase,  of 
different  form  on  each  piece,  painted  en  gyisaille  and  festooned  with  roses  in  colours ; 
beyond  are  detached  flowers.  The  rims  are  decorated  with  gold  discs  laid  over  a  scalloped 
border  of  hleu  de  roi,  and  within  this  border  with  radial  bands  of  husk-pattern  in  green 
separated  by  lines  of  gilt  dots.     Dish,  L    lOfs  in.,  W.  S  in.  ;  plates,  each,  diam.  S}-J  in. 

446.  Dish.     Mark,  "  D  "  intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold.      (Pl.\te  45.) 

Oval,  with  lobed  rim  and  wavy  edge.  In  the  centre  is  a  classical  vase  painted  en  grisaille, 
festooned  with  roses  in  colours,  in  an  oval  compartment  bordered  by  a  blue  line  twined 
about  with  a  wreath  of  leaves  in  gold.  Round  the  edge  is  a  broad  formal  border  in 
blue  de  roi  and  gold  from  which  are  suspended  festoons  of  laurel  in  colours.  Trophies 
en  grisaille  of  weapons  and  musical  instruments  respectively,  are  introduced  between  the 
festoons  and  the  compartment  in  the  middle.     L.  9^  in.,  \V.  7  in. 

447.  P.\iR  I'F  Dishes.     Mark,  "D"  intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold. 

Each  square,  with  rounded  corners  and  wavy  edge.  In  the  middle  is  a  classical  vase  garlanded 
with  laurel,  painted  en  grisaille.  The  rim  is  decorated  with  festoons  of  (lowers  in  natural 
colours  hung  from  gilt  rosettes.  The  underside  is  also  painted  with  sprigs  of  flower.s. 
Each,  W.  8a   in. 

448.  I'.viR  OF  Dishes.     (Pl.\te  45.) 

Each  oval,  with  wavy-edged  rim  pierced  with  formal  devices  in  openwork.     In    the   middle 
are  bouquets  of  flowers,  a  group  of  fruit,  and  insects,  in  natural  colours.     Each  L  oj  in 
W.  7A  in.  '       ^*      " 


74  CMKLSKA-DERBY. 

449.  Dish,  decorated  in   imitation  of  Se\res  porcelain. 

Oval,  witli  sliapod  rim  docorated  with  a  shaped  border  of  roses  within  gilt  circles  and 
festoons  of  liowers  among  rococo  scrollwork.  In  the  middle  is  a  cupid  among  clouds, 
with  a  quiver  slung  over  his  shoulder,  brandishing  a  torch  in  his  right  hand,  painted 
en  cama'icu  in  crimson.     I,,   iij   in.,  \V.  Sj  in. 

450.  Te.\-pot    and  Cover,  decorated    in  imitation  of  Chinese  porcelain.     Mark,  "D" 

intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold. 

Both  pieces  are  moulded  with  wavy  fluting  in  the  hollows  of  which  are  fronds ;  the  surface 
is  also  divided  into  wavy  panels  painted  with  conventional  floral  and  scrolled  ornament, 
alternately  red  on  white  and  white  outlined  in  gold  on  dark  blue.  The  spout  has  been 
broken  and  repaired  in  silver.     H.  6f  in.,  diam.  5|  in. 

The  same  pattern,  derived  from  Chinese  porcelain,  was  used  at  Worcester  ;  compare  Worcester 
tea-pot,  No.  588,  and  note  thereon. 

451.  Th.\-pot  with  Cover  and  Stand.     (Plate  45.) 

The  pot  and  cover  are  fluted  and  painted  with  garlands  of  flowers  in  .black  outline 
washed  over  with  green,  set  obliquely  with  pink  bands  between  them.  Hexagonal  stand, 
with  sloping  fluted  rim  similarly  decorated.  Tea-pot,  H.  6  in.,  diam.  5  in. ;  stand, 
W.  5f  in. 

Of  the  same  pattern  as  the  cup  and  saucer,  No.  458. 

364.  Jug. 

Ovoid  body,  spreading  foot,  slightly  expanding  mouth  with  lip  moulded  in  the  form  of  tlie 
head  of  a  man  wearing  a  cocked  hat.  Painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers. 
H.  gl  in.,  diam.  5J-  in. 

Probably  made  at  Chelsea. 

365.  Jug. 

Ovoid  body,  spreading  foot,  slightly  expanding  mouth    with    lip   moulded    in    the  form  of   a 

bearded  mask.     Painted  witli  sprays  of  flowers.     H.   7}  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 
Probably  made  at  Chelsea. 

392.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     (Plate  45.) 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  moulded  in  slight  relief  and  painted  with  a  garland  of  flowers  in 
colours  and  borders  in  blue  and  gold.  The  cups  have  no  handle  and  are  decorated  inside 
on  the  bottom  with  a  rose.     Cups,  H.  I5  in.,  diam.  2|  in.;  saucers,  diam.  5  in. 

452.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer.      Mark,  "D"    intersected    by  an    anchor,  in    gold.      1784. 

(Plate  45.) 

In  the  centre  of  the  saucer  is  a  classical  vase  painted  en  grisaille,  hung  with  green  garlands, 
in  a  medallion  with  a  ground  of  gilt  dots.  On  the  rim  of  the  saucer  and  on  the  outside 
of  the  cup  are  three  bouquets  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  on  a  ground  of  closely-set 
radial  or  vertical  gilt  stripes.  Inside  the  cup  and  on  the  lower  side  of  the  saucer  are 
sprigs  of  flowers.  The  cup  has  no  handle.  Cup,  H.  i\^  in.,  diam.  3  in.  ;  saucer, 
diam.  5  in. 

Part  of  a  service  made  for  the  Duchess  of  Devonshire  as  a  wedding  present  to  Mary  Babington, 
who  married  the  Rev.  Thomas  Gisburne,  of  Derby,  in  1784;  shown  at  the  Derby  Exhibition 
in  1870.  .\nother  cup  and  saucer  from  this  set  is  in  the  British  Museum,  sec  Hobson 
Catalogue,  p.  63.     Compare  also  note  on  No.  394  (below). 

394.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers.     Mark,  an  anchor  in  gold.     (Plate  45.) 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  decorated  with  sprays  of  flowers  en  cama'ieu  in  pink  on  a  ground 
of  wavy  gold  stripes.  The  cups  have  no  handle.  Cups,  H.  if  in.,  i|  in.,  diam.  3  in., 
3I  in.  respectively  ;  saucers,  diam.  5  in.,  5j  in.  respectively. 

For  the  provenance  and  date  of  pieces  with  gold  stripe  decoration,  see  Archaeological  Journal, 
vol.  xix.,  1862,  p.  347  ;  Nightingale,  p.  xxxii. 


CHELSEA-DERBV.  75 

407.  Coffee-cup.     Marked  with    crossed  swords  under  the  glaze  in  blue  in  imitation 
of  Meissen  porcelain  (No.  25). 

Painted  with  a  bouquet  and  sprigs  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  Gilt  lines  on  the  rim  and 
handle.     H.  2\  in.,  diani.  jj   in. 

453.  Cup  with  Cover  and  Saucer,  painted  en  camaieif  in  crimson  and   gilt,  in  imita- 

tion of  Sevres  porcelain.     Mark  ou  the  saucer,  "  D  "  intersected  by  an  anchor, 
in  gold.     (Plate  48.) 

On  each  side  of  the  cup  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  cupid  amid  clouds ;  two  of  the 
cupids  have  musical  instruments.  The  cover  is  painted  with  a  trophy  of  arms  and  a 
basket  of  grapes,  and  has  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a  flower.  Cup,  H.  3J  in.,  diam.  3  in.  ; 
saucer,  diam.  4^  in. 

454.  Two  Coffee-cups  and  Saucers.     Mark,  "  D  "  intersected  by  an  anchor,  in  gold. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  decorated  with  festoons  of  foliage  in  black  and  berries  in  gold 
hanging  from  a  gilt  border,  and  with  detached  flowers  in  colours.  Cups,  H.  2\  in., 
diam.  2J   in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  5j  in. 

455.  Coffee-cup   and    Saucer.       Mark,    "D"    intersected    bv    an     anchor,    in    gold. 

(Pl.\te  45.) 

The  outside  of  the  cup  and  the  inside  of  the  saucer  are  divided  by  bands  of  gilt  foliage,  the 
former  vertically,  the  latter  radially,  into  narrow  panels  decorated  alternately  with  a  stem 
of  ivy  twined  about  a  rod  in  gold  on  a  claret-coloured  ground,  and  with  a  pendant 
spray  of  flowers  outlined  in  black  washed  over  with  green  on  a  white  ground.  In  the 
centre  of  the  saucer  is  also  a  flower  in  green.  Both  pieces  have  a  wavy  edge.  Cup, 
H.  2|  in.,  diam.  2|-  in.;  saucer,  diam.  5  in. 

456.  Two  Chocolate-cups  and  Saucers.     (Plate  45.) 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  decorated  with  borders  of  scale-pattern  in  claret-colour  and  gold, 
edged  with  gilt  .'.crolls  from  which  hang  festoons  of  flowers  in  colours.  The  cups  have 
each  two  scrolled  loop  handles.     Cups,  H.  2|  in.,  \V.  41  in.;  saucers,  diam.  5^  in. 

Probably  made  at  Chelsea. 

457.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers.     Mark,  "N"  incised  (No.  27).     (Plate  45.) 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  decorated  with  festoons  of  flowers  suspended  from  the  gilt  edge. 
The  cups  have  no  handle.     Cups,  H.  1?  in.,  diam.  3^  in.;  saucers,  diam.  5  in. 

458.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer. 

The  outside  of  the  cup  and  the  inside  of  the  rim  of  the  saucer  are  fluted  and  decorated  with 
curved  pendant  garlands  of  flowers  in  black  outline  washed  over  with  green,  set  obliquely 
with  pink  bands  between  them.  Inside  the  cup  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a 
gilt  rosette.  Both  pieces  have  a  wavy  edge;  the  cup  has  no  handle.  Cup,  H.  ij  in., 
diam.  3  in. ;    saucer,  diam.  4I  in. 

Of  the  same  pattern  as  the  tea-pot.  No.  451. 


IV.— DERBY, 


THI'^  first  undoubted  reference  to  porcelain  made  at  Derby  is  contained 
in  announcements  in  the  Public  Advertiser  during  1756  of  an 
auction  sale  to  be  held  in  London  "  by  order  of  the  Proprietors  of 
the  DERBY  PORCELAIN  Manufactory."  In  1758  another  advertisement 
announces  the  enlargement  of  the  facto'ry  and  the  increase  of  the  establish- 
ment. The  first  proprietors  appear  to  have  been  William  Duesbury,  who 
had  previously  worked  as  an  enameller  on  porcelain  in  London/  and  John 
Heath.  In  1758  they  probably  bought  up  the  works  at  Longton  Hall,^ 
and  in  1770  the  Chelsea  factory,  which  was  carried  on  for  fourteen  years 
in  combination  with  that  at  Derby.^  In  1776  Duesbury,  by  that  time  sole 
proprietor  at  Derby,  purchased  also  the  Bow  factory  and  removed  the 
models  and  moulds  to  Derby.** 

William  Duesbury  died  in  1786  and  was  succeeded  by  a  son  of  the 
same  name,  who  was"  manager  until  his  death  in  1796  or  1797,  having  in 
1795  taken  into  partnership  the  miniature  painter  Michael  Kean.  The 
latter  carried  on  the  firm  under  the  style  of  Duesbury  and  Kean  until  1811, 
when  he  sold  it  to  Robert  Bloor.  Other  changes  in  the  management  took 
place  in  1828  and  1S44,  and  in  1848  the  factory  was  closed. 

It  is  impossible  to  identify  the  productions  of  the  earliest  stages. 
Those  made  during  the  amalgamation  with  Chelsea  have  already  been 
described  and  catalogued  under  the  heading  of  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain," 
except  in  the  case  of  a  few  specimens*'  which  bear  the  mark  of  a  crowned 
"  D  "  in  blue,  green,  purple  or  gold  over  the  glaze,  known  to  have  been  in 
use  at  Derby  before  1782.  About  that  date  the  mark  was  modified  by 
the  insertion  of  crossed  batons  and  six  dots  between  the  crown  and  the 
"  D"  ;  it  was  painted  at  first  in  blue,  puce  or  crimson.^  From  about  1810 
onwards  for  some  twenty  years  the  same  mark  was  used,  but  always 
painted  in  red.  After  1830  till  the  close  of  the  establishment  various 
printed  marks  were  in  use,  also  in  red.  The  crossed  swords  of  Meissen 
and  the  double  L  of  Sevres  in  blue,  the  former  chiefly  on  figures  and 
generally   under   the    glaze,    the    latter   in    overglaze  enamel,  were  also 

1  Compare  p.  35,  nr.te  on  No.  174.         -  Compare  p.  119.        *  Compare  pp.  29,  65. 
*  Compare  p.  4.  °  P.  29.  "  Nos.  461,  465,  467,  472,  474. 

7  Nos.  466,  476,  &c. 


IJERBV.  77 

occasionally  used  in  the  later  years  of  the  factory.  From  the  character  of 
the  marks  emploved  the  productions  of  the  middle  and  later  periods  are 
often  known  respectively  as  "  Crown-Derby"  and  "  Bloor-Derby  "  china. 
The  Derby  porcelain  of  the  last  two  decades  of  the  i8th  century 
is  characterised  by  a  restrained  and  sober  decoration  in  which  flower- 
painting  in  naturalistic  style  plays  a  leading  part.  The  work  of  some  of 
the  painters  can  be  identified  ;  amongst  them  Edward  Withers/  Zachariah 
Boreraan,-  and  Askew^  are  represented  in  the  Schreiber  Collection.  The 
wares  made  for  domestic  use  display  a  great  variety  of  good  border 
patterns  in  the  quasi -classical  taste  of  the  period.  The  forms  are 
generally  simple  and  graceful.  When  Bloor  became  manager  the  patterns 
assumed  a  more  showy  character.  Rich  colours  and  gilding  were  used  in 
excess,  whilst  adaptations  of  the  designs  on  Japanese  Imari  porcelain 
came  into  favour.  Figures  in  coloured  porcelain  and  biscuit,  the  latter 
remarkable  for  delicacy  of  modelling,  continued  to  be  made  until  the  close 
of  the  factory. 

§  I.   VASES. 

Nos.  459,  460. 

459.  \'ase  and  Cover,  painted  eti  grisaille  in  black  and  decorated  with  gilding.     The 

cover  is  fitted  to  the   vase    by  means   of  a    pierced  ormoulu  band.      Mark,    36 
incised.     About  1790.     (Plate  48.) 

In  the  form  of  a  goblet  decorated  round  the  top  with  a  vine-wreath,  moulded  in  relief  and  gilt, 
and  supported  on  a  high  foot  rising  from  a  square  plinth.  On  either  side,  separated  by 
goats'  head  handles,  from  which  hang  festoons  of  foliage,  are  oval  medallions  painted 
respectively  with  a  river-god.  and  with  a  female  figure  reclining  in  a  landscape  threatened 
by  Cupid  with  an  arrow.  The  cover  has  a  cone-shaped  knob  surrounded  by  wavy  (luting 
within  a  gilt  border.     H.  10  in.,  diam.  4!  in. 

Chaffers,  fig.  427. 

460.  Pair  of  V.\ses,  partly  gilded.     Mark,  "D"  surmounted  by  a  crown  and  crossed 

batons  with  six  dots  in  red.     .A-bout  1820.     (Pl.\te  48.) 

Each  in  the  form  of  a  circular  basket,  left  white,  supported  by  three  gilt  owls  standing  on  a 
three-sided  base,  which  has  three  feet  in  the  form  of  gilt  shells.  Each,  H.  4J  in.,  diam. 
3i  in- 

§  2.      PIECES  FOR  DOMESTIC  USE. 

Nos.  461-477. 

All   these  are  decorated  in   enamel  colours  and  gold  over  the  gla/.e, 
with  the  exception  of  No.  473,  on  which  the  blue  is  applied  before  glazing. 

461.  PiNCH-BOWL.     Mark,  "  D  "  under  a  crown,  in  overglaze  blue.     About  1780. 

Painted  with  bcniquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  and  decorated  with  borders  in 
bleu  de  roi  with  gilt  designs  consisting  on  the  inside  of  grapes,  vine-leaves  and  tendrils,  and 
on  the  outside  of  palmettes  and  scrolls.     H.  4J  in.,  diam.  gl  in. 

1  No.  465.  -  No.  471.  ^  No.  472. 


78  DERBY. 

462.  Punch-bowl.     Mark,  "D"  surmounted  by  a  crown  and  crossed  batons  with  six 

dots,  in  red.     About  1820. 

Painted  inside  and  outside  with  sprays  of  roses  and  with  a  wide  border  of  quatrefoil-shapcd 
compartments,  in  which  also  are  roses  reserved  on  a  ground  of  green  dots,  H.  4^  in., 
diam.   iij   in. 

463.  Pair  of  Custard-cups  and  Covers.     Mark,  "  D  "  surmounted  by  a  crown  and 

crossed  batons  with  six  dots,  in  purple.     About  1800.     (Plate  48.) 

Round  the  covers  and  the  upper  part  of  the  cups  is  a  band  of  cornflowers  and  foliage  on  a 
continuous  stem  ;  the  lower  part  of  the  cup  is  decorated  with  sprigs  of  the  same  flowers. 
Each,  H.  3J  in,,  diam.  25-  in. 

Bought  at  I?otterdam  on  November  ist,  1872,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  168,  "Next  to  the  Oppert, 
"  where,  at  a  shop  full  of  Oriental  china  (Van  der  Pluyne),  we  found  some  charming 
"  Crown  Derby  custard  cups  and  covers  for  which  we  paid  £2.  They  were  sold  to  us  as 
"  '  French  Fiirstenberg  ' !  "  The  pattern  is  known  as  the  "  French  "  or  "  Angouleme  sprig 
pattern,"  from  its  use  in  the  factory  of  the  due  d'.'Vngouleme  in  the  rue  de  Bondy,  Paris. 
Compare  Worcester  punch  bowl.  No.  538. 

464.  Pair  of  Triple  Salt-cellars.     Mark,  "  D  "  surmounted  by  a  crown  and  dots,  also 

33,  in  red.     About  1820. 

Kach  in  the  form  of  three  oval  baskets  joined  together,  with  a  twisted  handle  surmounted  by  a 
gilt  ring  rising  in  the  middle.  The  baskets  are  painted  with  sprays  of  roses  in  quatrefoil 
panels  reserved  on  a  ground  of  green  dots.     Each,   H.  6  in.,  W.  4^  in. 

465.  Jug,  painted  with  flowers,  probably  by  Edward  Withers.     The  spout  is  in  the  form 

of  the  head,  wearing  a  cocked  hat,  of  Lord  Rodney  (b.  1719,  d.  1792)  ;  below  it, 
within  a  medallion,  is  the  date  of  his  victory  over  the  French  admiral  De  Grasse 
in  the  West  Indies,  "April  the  12'  1782."  Mark,  "D"  under  a  crown,  in 
purple  (No.  30).     Dated  1782.     (Plate  48.) 

Pear-shaped,  with  foliated  loop  handle.  Below  the  medallion  on  the  front  are  the  initials  "  TB  " 
in  gold  ;  on  either  side  is  a  bouquet  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  Round  the  rim  is  a  wavy 
stem  of  laurel  with  leaves  and  berries  in  gold  on  a  blue  band ;  round  the  base  is  a  wreath 
of  gilt  leaves  twined  about  a  blue  line.     H.  7J   in.,  diam.  5  in. 

Several  examples  of  jugs  similar  to  this,  made  to  commemorate  Rodney's  victory,  are  in  existence  ; 
one  of  them  made  for  a  Derby  club,  is  described  by  Haslem  (Derby  China  Factory,  p.  202)  and 
figured  by  Bemrose  (Boio',  Chelsea,  and  Derby  Porcelain,  pi,  xviii).  The  painting  of  this  piece 
may  be  compared  with  that  of  a  dish  in  the  Museum  (No.  3047 — 1901),  which  was  identified 
by  Mr.  William  Bemrose,  junr.,  as  the  work  of  Withers  ;  the  form  of  spout  appears  to  be 
suggested  by  that  of  a  Meissen  coffee-pot  (compare  Festive  Publication,  fig.  97). 

466.  Jug.     On  the  front  are  the  letters  "  D.P.C."  in  cornflowers,  the  initials  of  Daniel 

Parker  Coke,  of  Trusley  and  Pinxton  (b.  1745,  d.  1825).  Mark,  "  D"  surmounted 
by  a  crown  and  crossed  batons  with  six  dots,  in  purple  (No.  29).  About  1802. 
(Plate  49.) 

Globular  body,  wide  reeded  cylindrical  neck  with  projecting  lip,  loop  handle.  Round  the  rim 
and  shoulder  are  borders  of  gilt  conventional  flowers  and  white  jewelled  dots  on  a  bleu  de 
roi  ground.  The  initials  are  surmounted  by  a  wreath  of  cornflowers.  H.  9I  in.,  diam. 
6|  in. 

Coke  was  elected  .M.P.  for  Derby,  on  petition,  in  1776.  In  1780  he  was  returned  for  Nottingham 
and  sat  for  that  borough  till  1S12,  having  been  re-elected  in  1802.  The  form  of  the  mark 
indicates  that  this  jug  was  probably  made  in  commemoration  of  his  third  election.  It  was 
a  member  of  the  same  family,  John  Coke,  who  founded  the  Pinxton  China  Works  in  1796. 
See  Coke,  Coke  of  Trusley,  pp.  34,  98. 


DERBY.  79 

467.  Mug.     Mark,  "  D  "  under  a  crown,  in  purple.     About   1780. 

Globular  body,  wide  reeded  cylindrical  neck,  loop  handle.  Round  the  shoulder  is  a  border  of 
gilt  rosettes  on  a  scalloped  bleu  dc  rui  band  ;  round  the  rim  is  a  plain  band  of  the  same  colour 
edged  with  gold.  The  remaining  surface  is  painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in 
natural  colours.     H.  4  in.,  diam.  3^  in. 

468.  Mug.     About  1790.     (Pl.\te  48.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  Round  the  top  is  a  conventional  wreath  in  red  with  a  line  of 
gold  above  and  green  below ;  from  the  green  band  hang  festoons  of  roses  in  purple. 
H.  4I  in.,  diam.  35  in. 

469.  -Mug,  with  glass  bottom.     About  1780.     (Pl.\te  48.) 

Cylindrical,  with  two  reeded  bands  and  loop  handle.  Round  the  top  is  a  continuous  stem  of 
laurel  with  leaves  and  berries  in  gold  on  a  bleu  de  mi  band  ;  near  the  base  is  a  wreath  of 
gilt  leaves  twined  about  a  blue  line.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  ^K  in. 

[470.   Mug,  Staffordshire  porcelain,  see  p.   155.] 

471.  Two  Plates,  with  landscapes  painted  by  Zachariah  Boreman   (b.  1738,  d.  1810), 

who  worked  at  the  Derby  factory  from  1783  to  1794.  In  the  middle  are 
landscapes  described  respectively  on  the  back  as  "Thorp  Cloud  Derbyshire," 
and  "  The  Derwent  in  the  Peak,  Derbyshire."  Mark  on  each,  "  D  "  surmounted 
by  a  crown  and  crossed  batons  with  six  dots,  in  overglaze  blue  ;  also  on  the 
first,  81  in  purple  over  the  blue  crown,  on  the  second,  182  in  blue.  About  1790. 
(Pl.\te  49.) 

The  rim  of  each  has  a  wavy  edge  and  a  Ixirder  of  gilt  conventional  ornament.     Diam.  g^  in. 

For  Boreman,  see  Haslem,  p.  67. 

472.  Two    Plates,   painted    by    Askew,    with    figures    en   cama'icu    in    pink   and    grey. 

Mark,  "D"  under  a  crown,  in  purple,     .\bout  1780.     (Plate  48.) 

In  the  middle  of  each  is  a  cupid  among  clouds,  in  pink,  in  one  case  in  a  reclining  attitude 
writing  on  a  scroll,  in  the  other,  kneeling  and  looking  through  a  telescope,  with  a  quiver 
and  scroll  beside  him  ;  the  figures  are  probably  intended  to  symbolise  History  and 
Astronomy.  The  rims  are  decorated  with  a  band  of  foliated  scrollwork  in  two  shades 
of  pink  and  witli  festoons  of  liusk-pattern  in  grey,  and  have  a  gilt  wavy  edge.  Each, 
diam.  8^  in. 

These  plates  may  be  compared  with  one  in  the  Museum  (N'o.  3041^1901),  formerly  in  the 
.Museum  of  Practical  Geology,  ascribed  to  Askew.     See  also  Haslem,  p.  46. 

473.  15hll-pull,  painted  in  blue  under  the  glaze  and  gilt.     About   1800. 

Pear-shaped,  fluted  at  either  end,  with  a  concave  band  round  tlic  middle  decorated  with 
gilt  rosettes  in  medallions  reserved  on  a  blue  ground.     1..  j[;  in.,  diam.  il  in. 

474.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer.      Mark,  "  D  "  under  a  crown,  in  overglaze  blue  (No.  32), 

and  "  N  "  incised.     About  1780. 

Both  pieces  are  decorated  with  a  border  of  gilt  rosettes  on  a  scalloped  blue  band  and  with 
sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  The  cup  has  no  handle.  Cup,  H.  i  J  in.,  diam.  3 J  in. ; 
saucer,  diam.  5J  in. 

475.  Two    Tea-cups.     Mark,    "IV    surmounted  by  a   crown  and   crossed  batons  witli 

six  dots,  in  crimson.     About  1790. 

Round  the  outside  is  a  border  of  scrolls  in  red  and  gold  interlaced  by  a  wavy  stem  of  foliage 
in  green.  Below  this  and  inside  the  cups  are  small  sprigs  of  flowers  in  gold.  No  handle. 
Kach,  H.  I4  in.,  dirmi,  3  in. 


8o  DERBY. 

476.  Two  Coffee-cups  and  Saucers.     Mark,  "  D  "  surmounted  by  a  crown  and  crossed 

batons  with  six  dots,  on  one  cup  in  crimson,  on  the  other  and  on  the  saucers 
in  purple  (No.  31).     About  1790. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  fluted  and  have  a  wavy  edge,  and  are  decorated  with  gilt  chain- 
pattern  on  vertical  bands  of  blue  {bleu  de  roi)  arched  at  the  upper  end  and  edged  with 
gilt  dots.  Inside  the  cups  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  is  a  gilt  floral  spray.  Other 
marks,  on  one  cup  and  one  saucer,  12  in  purple;  on  the  other  saucer,  i-j  in  crimson  and 
"  H  "  in  green.     Cups,  H.  2J  in.,  diam.  2^  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  5j  in. 

477.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers  and  two  Coffee-cups.     Mark  on  each  piece,  "  D  " 

surmounted  by  a  crown  and  crossed  batons  with  six  dots,  also    "  N"  86,"    in 
crimson,  and  5  in  blue  over  the  glaze.     About  1800.     (Plate  48.) 

Inside  the  cups  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  is  a  landscape  with  a  river  and  buildings, 
surrounded  by  a  wreath  of  foliage  in  gold  twined  about  a  blue  band.  Round  the 
outside  of  the  cups  and  the  rim  of  the  saucers  is  a  similar  wreath  enclosed  between 
bands  of  gilt  chain-pattern.  The  tea-cups  have  no  handle.  Other  mark,  5  in  blue. 
Tea-cups,  H.  ij   in.,  diam.  3j  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  5j  in.  ;  coffee-cups,  H.  2|  in.,  diam.  2|   in. 


v.— WORCESTER. 


THE  porcelain  works  at  Worcester  originated  in  1751,  as  the  result 
of  experiments  carried  out  by  Dr.  John  Wall,  physician,  and 
William  Davis,  apothecary.  The  manufacture  was  financed  by 
a  company  of  fifteen  partners.  Davis  was  appointed  manager,  and 
remained  in  that  position  until  he  died  in  1783.  Dr.  Wall  was  actively 
concerned  with  the  business  till  1766,  the  date  of  his  death.  In  1783 
the  companv  was  dissolved,  and  the  business  was  bought  by  their 
London  agent,  Thomas  Flight,  for  his  two  sons.  About  1792  Martin 
Barr  became  a  partner  in  the  firm,  which  was  carried  on  with  several 
changes  of  partnership  till  1840. 

A  second  factory  was  established  at  Worcester  in  1786  by  Robert 
Chamberlain  and  his  son,  who  had  left  the  original  factory  in  1783, 
and  was  carried  on  by  the  Chamberlain  family  until  1840,  in  which 
year  the  rival  firms  were  amalgamated.  The  new  partnership  was 
continued  till  1847,  when  the  earlier  factory  was  abandoned;  the 
manufacture  ^vas  thenceforward  continued  on  the  premises  of  Messrs. 
Chamberlain,  at  present  occupied  by  the  Worcester  Royal  Porcelain 
Company. 

The  paste  of  Worcester  porcelain  of  the  i8th  century  is  distinguislied 
by  the  use  of  soapstone  or  steatite  in  its  composition.  After  1800  this 
body  was  gradually  superseded  by  another,  similar  to  that  of  Staifordshire 
porcelain,  introduced  by  Martin  Barr. 

The  styles  of  decoration  adopted  may  be  followed  by  the  help  of 
certain  dated  pieces.  A  tureen  bearing  the  date  1751  ^  shows  that  during 
the  first  decade  small  landscapes  or  sprays  of  flowers  in  the  Chinese 
style,  simply  painted  in  underglaze  blue  or  in  colours,  were  combined 
with  moulded  panel  ornament  of  rococo  scrollwork  in  relief  suggested 
by  the  silversmiths'  work  of  the  period.  About  1756  transfer-printing 
from  copper-plates  over  the  glaze,  in  black  and  various  shades  of  red 
and  puri)le,  was  introduced,  probably  by  the  well-known  engraver  Robert 
Hancock  (b.  1730,  d.  1817),  who  is  generally  assumed  to  have  worked 
previously  for  the  enamel  factory  at  Battersea."  Porcelain  so  decorated 
in   black  was  known  at    the  time   as   "jet-enamelled";  sometimes   the 

'  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xvi.,  fig.  4.  *  See  note  on  p.  6  above. 

X     1!)259  F 


82  WORCESTER. 

transfer  prints  were  subsequently  painted  over  with  washes  of  enamel 
colours. 1  The  designs  for  the  engraved  plates  were  largely  borrowed 
from  prints  after  Gainsborough,-  Watteau,^  Le  Bas  and  other  painters, 
or  from  the  fantastic  compositions,  chiefly  in  pseudo-Chinese  style,*  of 
jean  Pillement.  Others  were  printed  in  the  drawing-books  of  the  period, 
such  as  the  "  LadieS'  Amusement,"  published  by  Robert  Sayer,  of  which 
a  copy  is  preserved  in  the  library  of  the  Museum.  The  prints  by 
Hancock  are  frequently  signed  with  his  name  ^  or  initials,^  sometimes 
accompanied  by  an  anchor,^  the  rebus  of  Richard  and  Josiah  Holdship, 
two  of  the  proprietors  of  the  factory,  who  until  1759  seem  to  have  been 
particularly  concerned  with  the  printing  department.  Two  pieces  in  the 
Schreiber  Collection  ^  are  decorated  with  prints  by  James  Ross,  who 
entered  the  works  as  assistant  to  Hancock  in  1765  and  died  in  1821. 
Hancock  left  the  works  in  1774.  Printing  under  the  glaze  in  cobalt- 
blue  was  probably  introduced  before  1760;  a  mug^  in  the  Collection 
decorated  in  this  manner  bears  the  date  1773. 

Two  jugs  belonging  to  the  Corporation  of  Worcester,  dated  1757, 
and  moulded  with  overlapping  leaves,  indicate  the  advance  towards  a 
more  ambitious  style  of  decoration.  The  influence  of  Meissen  porcelain, 
with  its  naturalistic  Rower-painting  in  enamel  colours,  begins  to  make 
itself  felt.  The  engagement  of  decorators  from  the  Chelsea  factory  about 
1768  was  the  beginning  of  a  period  of  great  prosperity  to  which  the 
finest  productions  belong.  Rich  coloured  grounds,  such  as  the  dark 
underglaze  powder-blue, i"  the  scale-pattern  in  the  same  colour, ^^  apple- 
green,^-  and  turquoise-blue,^^  now  make  their  appearance,  v/ith  polychrome 
figure-subjects,  flowers,  exotic  birds  or  insects  in  reserved  compartments, 
and  sumptuously  gilt  scrollwork  borders.  The  simple  Oriental  motives 
of  the  earlier  period  are  succeeded  by  complex  panelled  designs  '^ 
suggested  for  the  most  part  by  Japanese  Imari  ware.  This  phase  of 
the  manufacture  is  exemplified  by  the  punch-bowl  with  the  arms  of 
the  Marquis  of  Ely,  made  before  1770  (No.  523),  and  a  mug  made  in 
that  year  (No.  573)  in  the  Collection,  and  by  a  vase  with  a  figure-subject 
on  a  dark  blue  ground,  dated  1769,  in  the  Dyson  Perrins  Collection. ^^ 
The  blue  and  white  porcelain  made  in  this  period  is  represented  by  a 
hexagonal  flower-pot  dated  1776  in  the  same  coUection,^^  which  is  painted 

1  Nos.  481,  541,  569,  &c.         2  Nos.  541,  560.         "  No.  561.         *  Nos.  482,  609. 

=  Nos.  549,  627,  667.  ^  No.s.  488,  505,  546,  &c.  '^  Nos.  488,  546,  &c. 

8  Nos.  545,  558.  ^  No.  571.  ^0  Nos.  485,  508,  523,  601,  &c. 

"  Nos.  478,  537,  589,  &c.  1-  Nos.  527,  582.  1^  No.  509. 

'■*  Nos.  638,  663,  &c.  1'  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  Ixxxiv. 

"'  Hobson,  pi.  xviii.,  3. 


WORCESTER.  8^ 

with  Chinese  floral  ornament  in  the  same  style  as  a  pair  of  vases  in 
the  Schreiber  Collection  (No.  35).  The  transition  which  began  about 
this  time  to  the  pseudo-classical  manner  of  the  Louis  X\T.  period  is 
reflected  in  a  pair  of  cups  in  the  Collection  (No.  646)  dated  1782. 

The  change  of  management  in  the  following  year  was  succeeded  bv 
the  adoption  of  a  new  type  of  paste  and  a  more  formal  style  of  decora- 
tion. Early  in  the  19th  century,  at  the  original  factory  and  at  the 
works  of  Messrs.  Chamberlain  alike,  a  reversion  to  a  more  elaborate 
stvle  ensued,  which  is  seen  in  a  skilful  but  excessive  use  of  pictorial 
enamel  painting ;  this  phase  is  typified  by  a  plate  with  a  sporting 
subject  in  the  Collection  (No.  516a).  With  the  exception  of  this  and 
two  other  pieces,^  all  the  specimens  in  the  Collection  date  from  the 
i8th  century. 

The  three  best-known  Worcester  marks,  used  before  17S3,  are  the 
crescent,  the  letter  "  W,"-  and  an  imitation  of  a  Chinese  seal-character 
somewhat  resembling  the  Union  Jack,  known  as  the  "  fretted  square."^ 
The  two  last  are  always,  the  crescent  generally,  painted  in  blue  under 
the  glaze,*  the  crescent  being  in  exceptional  cases  painted  over  the  glaze 
in  blue,^  black, ^  or  red ''  enamel  or  in  gold.*  The  crescent  is  also  some- 
times printed  in  blue,  either  in  outline  or  horizontally  shaded.^  Other 
marks  which  also  occur  during  the  early  period  are  imitations  of  Chinese 
characters,^"  of  the  crossed  swords  of  Meissen  (accompanied  by  the 
numerals  9  or  gi),'^  and  of  the  double  L  of  Sevres,'-  and  various  workmen's 
marks,  such  as  those  resembling  the  monogram  TF  '^  and  the  sign  for 
a  sharp  in  music.'*  An  impressed  mark  "  T°,"  of  rare  occurrence  on 
Worcester  porcelain,  is  reputed  to  be  the  signature  of  a  modeller  named 
Tebo,  who  worked  also  at  Bow  and  Bristol. ^^ 

After  1783  various  names  or  initials  were  adopted  corresponding  with 
the  changes  of  partnership  of  the  two  firms,  sometimes  with  addresses 
of  their  London  agents.  The  only  later  marks  represented  in  the 
Schreiber  Collection  are  those  of  Messrs.  Chamberlain,^^  and  the  faint 
incised  "  B  "  '^  found  on  some  of  the  productions  of  the  older  factory 
for  a  few  years  after  the  accession  to  the  firm  about  1792  of  Martin  Barr. 

'  Nos.  492,  555.  -  No.  580.  '  Nos.  635,  656,  etc. 

'  The  blue  marks  cited  in  the  catalogue  are  all  under  the  glaze  unless  otherwise 

stated.     For  the  blue  crescent  compare  No.  529. 

■■'  Nos.  574,  58G,  644.  «  No.  631.  '  Nos.  625,  641. 

"  No.  644.  '  Nos.  520,  521.  1"  Nos.  517,  614,  &c.  "  No.  668. 

1-  No.  646.  IS  Nos.  35,  38,  52.  >+  No.  35. 

'^  No.  43.     Compare  pp.  5,    134,  and  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  p.   108. 

'"  Nos.  516a,  675.  '"  No.  492. 

F  3 


WORCESTER. 


§  I.    VASES    AND    ORNAMENTAL    PIECES. 
Nos.  478-494. 

These  pieces  are  variously  decorated  witli  painting  in  blue  under 
the  glaze  or  in  enamel  colours  over  it,  with  or  without  gilding,  or  with 
transfer  prints  in  black  or  lilac,  in  some  cases  washed  over  with 
colours. 

478.  Vase  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  giU.     Mark,  a    fretted  square    in  blue. 

About  1770.     (Plate  50.) 

Hexagonal,  the  body  expanding  slightly  upwards  to  the  shoulder,  which  curves  in  towards 
the  short  straight  neck.  Domed  cover  with  wide  rim  and  conical  knob.  On  either 
side  of  the  body  is  a  large  shaped  panel  painted  with  long-tailed  e.xotic  birds  among 
fruit-trees  and  bushes;  on  the  shoulder  between  the  larger  panels  are  two  smaller  ones 
painted  with  butterflies.  The  cover  is  decorated  with  four  similar  panels  containing 
alternately  butterflies  and  an  exotic  bird.  The  panels  are  enclosed  by  gilt  rococo  scroll- 
work and  reserved  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern,  over  which  are  added,  in 
gold,  sprays  of  conventional  flowers.     H.   i5  in.,  diam.  7|  in. 

Church,  fig.  31  ;  Dillon,  Porcelain,   igio,  fig.   282. 

43.  Vase  and  Cover,  with  applied  decoration  in  high  relief,  painted  in  colours 
and  gilt.  Mark,  "T""  impressed,  said  to  be  the  mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo. 
About  1770.     (Plate  51.J 

Hexagonal,  the  body  expanding  slightly  upwards  to  the  rounded  shoulder,  short  straight 
neck  with  moulded  rim,  high  domed  cover  with  wide  rim  and  on  the  top  a  flower  in 
full  relief.  The  body  has  two  female  masks  wreathed  with  flowers  in  relief  as  handles ; 
from  these,  and  from  blue  ribbons  tied  in  bows  between  them,  hang  festoons  of  applied 
flowers  coloured  after  nature,  one  on  each  of  the  six  sides.  Above,  on  the  shoulder, 
are  six  rococo  panels  bordered  with  scrollwork  in  relief  and  pierced  with  trelliswork. 
Slightly  below  the  middle  of  the  body  is  a  row  of  projecting  shell-like  ornaments,  and 
round  the  base  at  each  angle  are  scrolls  in  relief.  Garlands  of  applied  flowers  hang 
down  from  the  top  of  the  cover,  with  perforated  devices  between  them.  In  the  intervals 
of  the  relief  ornament  are  bouquets  and  detached  sprays  of  flowers,  butterflies  and  other 
insects  painted  in  colours.     H.  163-  in.,  diam.  65-  in. 

The  same  work  is  found  earlier  on  Bow  and  later  on  Bristol  porcelain  ;  see  pp.  5,  134,  where 
the  identity  of  the  modeller  is  discussed.  As  in  the  case  of  Xos.  41  and  711,  it  is  probable 
that  the  mark  refers  only  to  the  modelling  of  the  masks  introduced  in  the  decoration. 

Church  fig  46.  An  exactlv  similar  specimen  is  figured  in  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain, 
pl.'xii. 

479.  Vase  and  Cover,  painted  in  underglaze  blue,  in  imitation    of  Chinese  porcelain. 

Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue.     About  1770.     (Plate  52.) 

Oviform  body,  painted  on  either  side  with  figures  of  a  Chinese  lady  and  boy,  in  one  case 
accompanied  by  a  dog,  in  a  panel  bordered  with  scrollwork  and  diaper-pattern.  Short 
concave  neck,  domed  cover  painted  with  a  diaper  border  and  surmounted  by  a  knob  in 
the  form  of  a  flower.     H,  8}  in.,  diam.  3|  in. 

Bought  at  Dijon  on  February  25th,  1870,  sec  Journals,  i.,  p.  75,  "  In  another  shop,  Cazet's, 
40,  Rue  Chabot  Charin,  we  found  a  Worcester  vase  with  _  Chinese  figures,  blue  and 
white,  not  curious  or  uncommon,  but  too  good  to  be  left  at  the  price,  3/4." 


WORCESTER.  85 

35.  Pair  of  Vases  with  Covers,  painted  in  underglaze  blue  in  the  Chinese  style. 
Mark,  on  one  resembling  "TF  "  in  monogram  (No.  35),  on  the  other  similar  to 
the  sign  for  a  sharp  in  music  (No.  34),  in  blue  ;  in  both  cases  the  mark  is 
repeated  on  the  cover.     About  1775.     (Plate  53.) 

The  vases  are  he.\agonal,  witli  sides  expanding  slighth-  upwards  to  the  rounded  shoulder, 
short  straight  neck  and  domed  cover  with  high  knob.  The  sides  of  both  vases  are 
painted  with  two  alternating  designs  of  flowering  plants,  with  a  Chinese  phoenix  among 
them  in  one.  On  the  shoulders  and  covers  are  Chinese  landscapes  in  quatrefoil  panels 
on  a  ground  of  lotus-flowers  and  foliage.  The  necks  and  the  rims  of  the  covers  are 
decorated  with  diaper-pattern.     H.   15I  in.,   15J  in.  respectively,  diam.  each  6  in. 

These  vases  and  the  three  following  w  ere  formerly  ascribed  to  Bow.  Conclusive  evidence  in 
favour  of  their  attribution  to  Worcester  is  given  in  detail  by  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain, 
p.  44,  where  it  is  suggested  that  the  "  TF  "  mark,  formerly  interpreted  as  the  monogram 
of  Thomas  Frye  of  Bow,  may  be  a  "  maimed  version  "  of  the  Chinese  character  yii  (jade). 
The  decoration  is  similar  to  that  of  a  flower-pot  figured  in  Hobson,  0/).  cit.,  pi.  xviii.  3; 
see  also  p.  49,  where  it  is  suggested  that  the  painting  in  each  case  is  the  work  of  the  same 
hand. 

38.  Vase  and  Cover,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.      Mark,  resembling  "TF"  in  mono- 

gram, also  "  P  "  or  "  d,"  in  blue  (No.  37).     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  52.) 

Inverted  pear-shaped  body,  concave  neck,  domed  cover  with   knob  in  the   form   of  a  flower. 
On    one  side   of  the  body  are  small  birds  mobbing  an  owl  which  is  perched  on  an  old 
tree  in  a  landscape ;    the  remaining  surface  and  the  cover  are  painted   with  birds  flying. 
H.  8  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 
For  the  mark,  compare  note  on  No.  35  ;  compare  also  note  on  No.  39. 

39.  Vase  .vnd  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About  1760.     (Plate  52.) 

Inverted  pear-shaped  body,  concave  neck,  domed  cover  with  knob  in   the  form   of  a   flower. 

On  one  side  of   the  body   is  a  design,  similar  to  that  on  No.  38,  of  small  birds  mobbing 

an  owl  which  is  perched  on  an  old  tree;  on  the  other  are  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers. 

The  neck  and  cover  are  also  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  8  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 
The  design   appears   to   be   inspired   by   an   engraving  by  J.    June,  published  in    The   Ladies' 

Amusement  (pi.  155).     Compare  also  note  on  No.  35. 

40.  Vase  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About  1760.     (Plate  52.) 

Elongated  ovoid  body,  concave  neck,  domed  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of  a  flower.  The 
body  is  painted  with  exotic  birds  perched  on  a  tree  in  a  landscape  and  others  flying ; 
on  the  cover  are  sprays  of  flowxrs.     H.  8}  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

This  vase  has  been  erroneously  ascribed  to  Bow.  See  Mew,  Old  Bow  China,  pi.  i. ;  also  note 
on  No.  35. 

480.  Vase  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  pseudo-Japanese  style.     .'\.bout 

1770.     (Plate  55.) 

Hexagonal,  the  body  expanding  slightly  upwards  to  the  convex  shoulder,  short  straight  neck, 
domed  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of  a  flower.  The  body  is  painted  with  chrysanthemums 
and  other  (lowers  on  scrolled  stems,  long-tailed  birds,  and  insects,  in  red'  blue,  green, 
turquoise-blue  and  gold.  The  shoulder  and  cover  are  decorated  with  an  irregular'  border 
of  turquoise-blue,  edged  with  gilt  scrolls.  The  cover  is  also  painted  with  small  floral 
sprays.  H.  n  in.,  diam.  5^  in. 
Gibb  and  Rackham,  pi.  27. 

481.  Vase  and  Cover,  decorated  with  prints  in  lilac  painted  over   in   colours;  slight 

touches  of  gilding  also  occur.     About  1770. 

Hexagonal,  the  body  expanding  slightly  upwards  to  the  rounded  shoulder  which  has 
collapsed  slightly  in  the  firmg ;  short  straight  neck,  domed  cover  with  wide  rim  aiid 
conical  knob.  On  the  body  are  two  large  and  two  smaller  shaped  panels  outlined 
in   black,   reserved   in  white  on   a  canary   yellow  ground.      The   panels    contain  varit)us 


86  WORCESTER. 

purple  prijits  painted  over  in  colours,  representing  classical  ruins  ar  fountains  in 
landscapes  with  figures  of  ecclesiastics  or  peasants.  On  the  shoulder  are  four  sprays 
of  flowers  painted  in  colours  on  the  yellow  ground  in  the  intervals  between  the  panels. 
On  the  cover  are  similar  prints  in  small  panels,  also  reserved  on  a  yellow  ground.  The 
neck  and  the  rim  of  the  cover  are  decorated  with  prtinus  blossoms  in  gold  on  a  ground 
of  Chinese  diaper  in  red.  H.  12^  in.,  diam.  6|  in. 
Church,  fig.  30. 

482.  Bottle,  decorated  with    prints    in    black,  painted  over  in  colours.     About   1765. 

(Plate  63.) 

Hexagonal,  with  bulbous  body,  spreading  base,  and  long  narrow  neck.  On  either  side  of  the 
body  are  different  grotesque  compositions  of  Chinese  figures,  scrollwork  and  buildings ; 
two  of  the  figures,  one  of  them  a  boy  with  a  bow  astride  a  rococo  branch,  are  taken 
from  a  design  by  Jean  Pillement,  which  appears  on  No.  609.  The  design  on  one  side 
is  repeated  on  the  neck  immediately  below  the  mouth.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 

Compare  note  on  No.  6o<-). 

483.  Bottle,  painted  in  colours  in  pseudo-Chinese  style.     About   1765.     (Plate  63.) 

Hexagonal  with  bulbous  body,  spreading  base,  and  long  narrow  neck.  On  one  side  of  the 
body  are  two  performing  Chinese  acrobats,  on  the  other  is  a  small  landscape  with 
buildings.     Below  the  neck  is  a  formal  border  in  red.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 

Bought  at  Amsterdam  on  August  17th,  1869,  see  Jourimh,  i.,  p.  33,  "  .'Vt  Ganz's  .... 
small  Worcester  vase  with  acrobat,  5s." 

484.  ^'ASE,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1765.     (Plate  62 ) 

Inverted  pear-shaped  body,  concave  neck.  Painted  with  Chinese  landscapes  in  crimson,  in 
two  large  and  four  smaller  quatrefoil  panels  which  are  reversed  in  white  on  a  canary 
yellow  ground  on  which  are  scattered  sprays  of  chrysanthemums  and  other  flowers  in 
colours.  Round  the  neck  is  a  border  of  close  red  foliage  and  flowers.  H.  6|  in., 
diam.  4I  in. 

The  landscapes  in  this  and  similar  pieces  (Nos.  540,  576,  585)  appear  to  be  inspired  by  two 
engravings  published  in  The  Ladies'  Amusement  (pi.  172,   177J. 

485.  Pair  of  Vases,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  "  W"  in  blue.     About  1770. 

(Plate  64.) 

Ovoid  body,  short  flaring  neck.  On  either  side  of  the  body  is  a  bouquet  of  flowers  in  natural 
colours  in  a  heart-shaped  panel  surrounded  by  a  border  of  gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and 
leafy  sprays  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  powdered  blue  ground  ;  within  the  lip  a  formal 
border  of  gilding.     Each,  H.  6  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

486.  Vase,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt  in  the  Chinese  style.     About  1765.     (Plate  55.) 

Beaker-shaped,  with  convex  swelling  in  the  middle.  On  either  side  are  standing  figures  of 
Chinese  ladies  in  colours,  one  holding  a  vase  on  a  tray,  the  other  a  wand,  in  a  shaped 
panel  bordered  with  foliated  scrollwork  in  red  and  black,  in  reserve  on  a  ground  of  gilt 
scrolls.     H.  jj  in.,  diam    3J-  in. 

487.  Vase,  printed  in  black  from  a  plate  by  Robert  Hancock,  with  a  milking  scene, 

after  an  engraving  bv  Luke  Sullivan,  published  in  1759,  of  ".\  view  of 
Woobourn  in  Surry,  the  seat  of  Philip  Southcote,  Esq"^"  of  which  a  print 
accompanies  the  Collection,  No.   1822.     About  1760.     (Pl.a.te  56.^ 

Beaker-shaped.     The  print  of  the  milking-scene  shows  a  youth  leaning  against  a  tree  talking 

to  a  girl  who  is  milking  a  cow  ;  two  other  cows   are   in   the   background.     Below   is   a 

smaller  print  of  a  woman  beside  a  shed  with   a  cow  and  calf.     On   the   reverse   side   of 

the  vase  are  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  6  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 
Presented   to   Ladv   Charlotte   Schreiber   by    Mr.  Ivor   Guest,  afterwards  Lord  Wimborne,  on 

September    nth,    i86q,    see  Joimials,   i'.,  p.  36.     For  the   printed  decoration,  sa-  Hobson. 

Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  73. 


WORCESTER.  87 

488.  V.\SE,  printed    in    black,  from    a    plate    by  Robert  Hancock,  with   a  full-length 

portrait  of  the  "  Kimg  of  Prussia"  (Frederick  the  Great,  b.  1712,  d.  1786),  after 
a  painting  bv  Antoine  Pesne,  at  one  time  in  the  collection  of  the  Princess 
Dowager  of  Wales,  of  which  an  engraving  by  Richard  Houston  accompanies 
the  Collection  (No.  1886).  Below  is  a  military  trophy  with  three  flags  bearing 
the  names  of  Frederick's  victories,  "  Reisbevg,  Prague,  Collin ;  Welham,  Ross- 
bach,  Breslau ;  Nenmark,  Lissa,  Breslau."  Both  prints  are  signed  "R  H 
Worcester,"  in  the  case  of  the  second  accompanied  by  an  anchor,  the  mark  of 
Richard  Holdship.     Dated  1757.     (Plate  56.) 

Elongated  ovoid  body,  concave  neck.  Above  the  figure  of  Frederick  are  two  cupids  holding 
a  laurel-wreath  and  a  palm  branch  ;  a  battle  is  represented  in  the  background.  On  the 
reverse  is  a  figure  of  Fame  blowing  two  trumpets.     H.   lo  in.,  diam.  5-J   in. 

A  jug  with  similar  prints  is  described  by  Thomas  Carlyle  (History  of  Frederick  II.  oj  I'russia, 
called  Frederick  the  Great,  vii.,  book  viii.,  ch.  10)  ;  "  Reisberg,"  "  Welham  "  and  "  Neu- 
mark"  are  there  explained  as  referring  to  the  engagements  at  Reichenberg,  Welmina 
and  Neumarkt.  The  same  print  occurs  on  No.  505,  and  on  an  enamel  plaque  in  the 
Collection  (\'o.  1407),  presumed  to  have  been  made  at  Battersea. 

489.  \'.vsi;,  printed  in  black.     On  one  side  is    a  landscape  copied  from  an  engraving 

by  Francis  Vivares,  published  in  1752,  after  a  painting  dated  1701  by  Pierre 
Antoine  Patel.     About  1760.     (Plate  57.) 

Ovoid  body,  concave  neck.  The  print  after  Vivares  depicts  a  view  of  a  monumental  fountain 
and  ruined  buildings,  with  two  figures  crossing  a  bridge  in  the  foreground,  and  the  sea 
in  the  distance.  On  the  reverse  side  of  the  body  is  printed  a  view  of  ruined  classical 
colonnades.  On  the  neck  and  in  the  interspaces  on  the  body  are  Hying  birds  and 
insects.     H.  6|  in.,  diam,  4j  in. 

490.  Water-bottle    for  a    washstand,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.     .Mark,  a  crescent 

in  blue.     About  1765. 

Bulbous  body,  with  long  narrow  neck  and  conve.x  swelling  below  the  mouth.  On  one"side 
is  a  Chinese  river-scene  with  figures,  a  bridge  and  a  boat,  on  the  other  is  a  Chinese  boy 
holding  a  bird,  near  a  building  beside  a  pine-tree,  with  two  birds  Hying  above  ;  round 
the  top  of  the  neck  is  a  border  of  panelled  floral  and  diaper  ornament.  H.  10^  in., 
diam.  jj  in. 

[491.  Water-bottle,  Bow  porcelain,  see  [>.  24.] 

492.  I"lo\ver-pot,  printed  in  black  from  plates  by  Robert  Hancock,  on  one  side 
with  a  bust  of  Queen  Charlotte  (b.  1744,  d.  1818J,  and  on  the  other  with  a 
group  of  ruins.  The  bust  is  after  a  portrait  drawn  and  engraved  by  fames 
McArdell,  published  in  1762,  shortly  after  the  marriage  of  the  Queen  to  King 
George  III.     Mark,  "2"  and  "B"  (No.  48)  incised.     .About  1809. 

Inverted  truncated  cone-shaped,  with  two  adherent  ring-handles.  Below  the  portrait  is  tlu' 
name  "Q.  CHARLOTTE."     H.  4?  in.,  diam.  4|  in. 

This  piece  was  probably  made  at  the  time  of  the  Jubilee  of  King  George  III.  in  1809.  A 
similar  piece  with  the  same  mark,  and  a  portrait  of  the  king,  after  a  print  also  engraved 
at  the  time  of  his  marriage,  is  figured  by  Hobson,  Wurcestcr  Porcelain,  pi.  liii,  fig.  7. 
The  incised  "  B  "  is  probably  the  initial  of  Martin  Barr,  who  joined  the  management 
of  the  factory  in  1792;  the  statement  of  Binns  (Century  nf  Potting,  p.  215)  that  this 
mark  was  used  from  1793  to  1803  appears  to  be  controverted  by  the  occurrence  of  the 
mark  on  this  piece. 


88  WORCESTKR. 

52.  Basket,    painted    in    undcrglaze    blue    in    tlie    Chinese    style.      Mark    resembling 

"  TF  "  in  monogram,  in  blue.     About  1760.     (Plate  61.) 

Oval  with  shaped  rim,  sides  of  open  trellisvvork  with  leaves  in  relief  on  the  outside,  and 
spreading  foot,  also  moulded  with  foliage.  Inside,  on  the  bottom,  is  painted  a  Chinese 
landscape,  with  buildings  and  boats  on  a  lake  ;  the  sides  are  painted  with  sprays  of  (lowers 
and  insects,  and  with  a  floral  border  round  the  rim.  A  band  of  similar  Moral  ornament  is 
painted  round  the  outside  above  the  foot.     H.  j!  in.,  L.  i  j„  in.,  W.  13  in. 

Formerly  ascribed  to  Bow ;  see  note  on  No.  35. 

53.  Pair    of    Flower-holders,   moulded   in   relief  and  painted   in   underglaze   blue. 

Mark,  somewhat  resembling  a  dagger  in  blue  (No.  36).    About  1755.    (Plate  61.) 

In  the  form  of  a  cornucopia,  flat  at  the  back  and  moulded  in  front  with  a  landscape  in  which 
are  cattle  and  buildings ;  at  the  lower  end  are  floral  sprays  moulded  in  relief  or  painted  in 
blue,  and  round  the  top  is  a  border  of  foliated  scrolls  in  relief  above  a  band  of  floral  and 
diaper  ornament  in  blue.     H.  SJ  in.,  8|  in.,  W.  6J  in.,  6J  in.  respectively. 

A  pair  of  Staffordshire  salt-glazed  flower-holders  in  the  Schreiber  Collection  (No.  -873)  are  from 
a  similar  mould.     For  the  mark,  see  Hobson,   Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  44. 

493,  BoNBONNiERE,    painted    in    colours   and    gilt,  with  hinged   brass    mount.     Inside 

the  lid  are  the  arms  of  Downes.     About  1770. 

Circular,  with  concave  sides  and  slightly  convex  lid.  On  the  top  and  sides  and  underneath 
the  bottom  are  bouquets  or  garlands  of  flowers  in  natural  colours,  in  shaped  panels 
bordered  with  gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  green  ground  painted  to 
imitate  shagreen.  The  shield  inside  the  lid— argent  three  pallets  wavy  gules— is  enclosed 
by  rococo  scrolls  and  garlands  of  flowers  painted  en  camaicu  in  crimson  and  purple  ;  it 
is  surmounted  by  the  crest,  a  wolf's  head  erased.     H.   ii'i,  in.,  diam.   2\  in. 

494.  PiPE-BOWL,  moulded    in  relief    and   painted  in  colours,  with  mounts,  chain  and 

hinged  perforated  lid  of  brass.     About   1770. 

The  upper  part  of  the  bowl  is  of  slightly  bulbous  form,  and  is  painted  on  either  side  with  a 
bouquet  in  natural  colours.  The  lower  part  is  moulded  in  the  form  of  a  coiled  fish,  from 
the  open  mouth  of  which  issues  the  base  of  the  stem.  The  head,  fins  and  tail  are  picked 
out  in  colours.     H.  4  in.,   W.   2|  in. 

Church,  fig.  35. 


§  2.   PIECES    FOR    DOMESTIC    USE. 

Nos.  495-675. 

Variously  decorated  with  moulding  in  relief,  gilding,  painting  in 
blue  under  or  over  the  glaze,  or  in  other  enamel  colours,  or  transfer 
prints  in  black,  red,  lilac  or  purple  over  the  glaze,  with  or  without 
washes  of  enamel  colour,  or  in  blue  under  the  glaze. 

495.  Hand    Candlestick,    painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     x-\bout  1770. 

Circular  tray  bordered  with  gilt  scrolls  in  relief,  within  which  are  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours 
The  socket  is  moulded  with  foliated  ornament,  edged  with  green.  Under  the  scrolled  loop 
handle  is  a  ma^k  in  relief.     H    2I  in.,  diam.  57  in. 


WORCESTER.  8g 

496.  Sauce-boat,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  underglaze  blue.  Mark,  a  crescent 
in  blue.     About  1770. 

Bowed  sides  moulded  with  bunches  of  Howers,  wavy  rim,  projecting  lip,  scrolled  loop  handle. 
Outside,  under  the  lip,  and  inside  are  conventional  floral  sprays  in  blue.  The  inside  is  also 
painted  with  a  border  of  Chinese  diaper-pattern.     H.  3J  in.,  L.  6J  in. 

0[  the  same  model  as  a  sauce-boat  of  Bristol  porcelain  (N'o.  744),  and  two  of  Staffordshire  salt- 
glazed  stoneware  (.\'os.  891,  899)  in  the  Schreiber  Collection. 

[497.  Pair  of  S.\uce-boats,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  .vte  p.  159.] 

88.  Sauce-bo.\t,  moulded  in  low  relief  and  printed  in  black.     About  1755.     (Plate  61.) 

Wavy  rim,  projecting  lip,  scrolled  loop  handle.  On  either  side  are  rococo  scrolls  in  relief 
forming  panels  which  are  printed  with  a  squirrel  and  pheasant  respectively  in  oval  frames 
surrounded  by  scrollwork  and  flowers.  On  the  front  is  a  rose,  and  inside  on  the  bottom  is  a 
milking  scene.     H.  3I  in.,  I,.  7|  in. 

This  and  the  following  piece  belong  to  a  class  formerly  attributed  to  Bow,  but  shown  to  be  of 
Worce,ster  origin  by  the  evidence  cited  in  Hobson,  Guide  to  English  Pottery,  p.  iii,  and 
Worcestey  Porcelain,  p.  43. 

89.  S.AUCE-B0.\T,    moulded  in    low    relief,    printed    in    black,    and    painted    in  colours. 

About   1755.     (Plate  61.) 

Wavy  rim,  projecting  lip,  scrolled  loop  handle.  On  either  side  are  rococo  scrolls  in  relief  picked 
out  in  cjimson,  forming  panels  which  are  printed  with  Chinese  figure-subjects  ;  on  the  front 
is  printed  a  bird  perched  on  a  branch.  The  foot  and  inside  of  the  rim  are  painted  with 
sprays  of  flowers.  Inside  on  the  bottom  is  printed  a  boy  blowing  bubbles  among  ruins. 
H.  jj-  in.,  L.  jl  in. 

See  note  on  No.  88  above. 

786.  Pair  of  Sauce-boats,  moulded  in  relief  and  printed  in  black.  In  four  panels 
on  the  outside  of  both  are  figure-subjects  emblematical  of  the  Four  Seasons 
and  the  Four  Ages  of  Man  respectively.     .Vbout  1755. 

Boat-shaped,  moulded  at  the  ends  with  broad  fluting,  on  the  sides  with  wreaths  of  foliage 
enclosing  the  panels.  On  either  side  between  the  panels  is  a  scrolled  loop  handle 
rising  above  the  rim,  with  a  knob  on  the  top  of  it.  The  two  series  of  prints  depict 
respectively,  the  one  a  lady  and  a  gardener  with  a  flow^er-pot  and  watering-can,  a  man 
and  woman  reaping  corn,  a  man  and  woman  drinking  wine  in  a  vineyard,  and  a  man 
skating  pushing  a  lady  in  a  sledge ;  the  other,  a  nurse  and  a  child  te'aching  an  infant 
to  walk,  three  boys  playing  at  soldiers,  a  young  couple  with  a  baby,  and  an  aged  man 
and  woman  amongst  leafless  trees.  Inside  on  the  bottom  of  each  sauce-boat  is  the 
sarne  print  of  swans  and  other  water-fowl  amongst  trees.  H.  3;  in.,  3^  in.,  L.  7|  in., 
7I  in.,  W.  6J  in.,  6^  in.  respectively. 
These  sauce-boats  were  formerly  ascribed  to  Liverpool.  They  belong,  however,  to  the  same 
class  as  No.  88;  see  note  thereon  above.  A  similar  example  is  figured  in  Hobson,  Wnrccster 
Porcelain,  p.  43. 

498.  Disii,  printed  and  painted  in  black.     About  1760. 

Oblong  octagonal.  In  the  middle  are  two  prints  of  views  of  classical  ruins.  In  one  of  these 
two  figures  beside  a  tomb  are  seen  in  the  foreground.  In  the  other  are  a  man  reclining  and 
a  woman  drawing  water  at  a  fountain,  which  is  surmounted  by  a  statue  of  a  triton,  while 
in  the  background  Trajan's  Column  and  the  ruins  of  the  Temple  of  Castor  in  the  Forum  at 
Rome  figure  conspicuously.  The  rim  is  decorated  with  eight  smaller  prints  of  ruins.  Below- 
each  print  is  a  border  of  scrolls  painted  in  black.     L.  14!  in.,  W.  10}  in. 

The  feathery  scrollwork  painted  below  the  prints  on  this  and  the  ne.xt  two  specimens  may  be 
compared  with  that  on  a  jug  dated  1759  which  is  figured  in  Hoh^on,  Worcester  Porcelain 
p.  82. 


qo  WORCESTER. 

499.  Dish,  printed  and  painted  in  black.     About   17O0. 

Oblong  octagonal.  In  the  middle  is  a  print  of  a  view  of  classical  ruins,  with  two  figures  beside 
a  tomb  in  the  foreground ;  on  the  rim  are  eight  smaller  prints  of  ruins.  I!elow  each  print 
is  a  border  of  scrolls  painted  in  black.     1..   i2|  in.,  W.  8^  in. 

Compare  note  on  No.  498. 

499a.   Dish,  printed  in  black  and  painted  in  purple.     About   1760.     (Pl.\te  56.) 

Oblong  octagonal.  In  the  middle  is  a  print  of  a  view  of  classical  ruins  with  a  man  reclining 
and  a  woman  drawing  water  at  a  fountain,  which  is  surmounted  by  a  statue  of  a  triton, 
while  in  the  background  Trajan's  Column  and  the  ruins  of  the  Temple  of  Castor  at  Rome 
are  conspicuous.  On  the  rim  are  eight  smaller  landscapes  of  a  similar  character,  lielow 
each  print  is  a  border  of  scrolls  painted  in  purple.  L.  lOj  in.,  W.  8  in. 
Compare  note  on  No.  49S. 

500.  Dish,  printed    in    black  with  the  subject  known  as  "The    Tea    Party,"    from    a 

jjlate  engraved  by  Hancock,     .^bout  1765. 

Moulded  in  the  form  of  two  lettuce-leaves,  laid  partially  one  over  the  other.  The  ^rint  depicts 
a  lady  and  gentleman  in  costume  of  the  period  seated  at  a  table  drinking  tea,  in  a  garden 
with  a  statue  in  the  distance.  In  the  foreground  are  a  dog  and  a  cat  and  musical  instru- 
ments; a  negro  servant  approaches  from  behind  with  a  kettle.     L.   loj  in.,  W.  yf  in. 

.•\n  engraving  of  "The  Tea  Party"  appears  on  pi.  84  of  The  Artist's  Vade  Mecum,  3rd 
edition,  published  in   1776,  in  the  Library  of  the  British  Museum. 

58.  Dish,  moulded  in  relief,  painted  in  colours  and  printed  in  black.  About  1760. 
(Plate  59.) 

Oval.  The  rim  is  moulded  in  high  relief  with  a  lizard,  birds,  fishes,  insects  and  flowers  among 
rococo  scrolls,  painted  in  colours.  In  the  middle  are  printed  the  same  two  views  of  classical 
ruins  as  are  printed  on  No.  498,  and  between  them  a  river-scene,  with  a  ship  flying  a  British 
ensign  and  other  vessels.     L.  i8|  in..  W.  13-I  in. 

Bought  in  London  in  1884,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  433.  "  I  have  bought  several  rather  remarkable 
"  pieces  to  add  to  the  collection  ...  a  large  Bow  dish — transfer  printed,  and  with  a 
"  border  in  relief,  &c.  &c."  .Another  dish  from  the  same  mould  is  known  which  bears  the 
mark  resembling  TF   in  monogram  ;  sec  note  on  No.  35. 

[501.  Dish,  Bow   porcelain,  see  p.   18.] 

502.  Pair  of  Dishes,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1775.     (Pl.\te  63.) 

Heart-shaped  with  gilt  edges.  On  the  rim  are  six  e.xotic  birds, — two  pairs  perched  on  branches 
with  fruit  and  foliage,  two  placed  singly  flying.  In  the  middle  is  a  group  of  fruit.  Each, 
L.  lOfV  in.,  W.  7H  in. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.   10. 

503.  P-^iR    OF    Dessert-dishes,    moulded    in    relief    and    painted    in    colours.      About 

1770.     (Plate  63.) 

In  the  form  of  an  oval  basket,  with  low  openwork  sides,  imitating  looped  wickerwork,  and 
overlaid  at  either  end  with  vine  leaves  in  relief,  the  stem  forming  a  loop  handle  :  the  leaves 
and  stems  are  painted  in  natural  colours.  In  the  middle  and  on  the  hoops  of  the  basketwork 
are  bouquets  or  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours  ;  the  groundwork  of  the  rim  between  the  hoops 
is  coloured  canary-yellow.     Each,  L.   12  in.,  \V.  8|  in. 

Of  the  same  model  as  a  dish  of  Bristol  porcelain  (No.  749),  and  another  of  Staffordshire  salt- 
glazed  stoneware  (No.  gig),  in  the  Schreiber  Collection. 

504.  Disii,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     About  1765.     (Plate  64.) 

Oval  with  wavy  rim,  moulded  with  rococo  scrolls  and  wickerwork  pattern  and  pierced  with  four 
panels  of  open  trelliswork.  In  the  middle  is  a  panel  surrounded  by  scrolls  painted  in 
colours,  with  exotic  birds  among  bushes.  The  scrolls  are  painted  in  crimson,  and  the 
ground  is  coloured  canary-yellow,     L,  io|  in,,  W.  8J  in. 

Bought  in  London  on  November  24th,  1884,  see  Jouyimls,  ii.,  p.  458.  •' .  .  .  took  a  fancy  to 
a  yellow  ground  open-work  Worcester  dish.     .     .     ." 


WORCESTER.  91 

505.  Dish,  printed  in  black,   with  a  figure   of  Fredericlv  the  Great,   King  of  Prussia, 

from  the  same  plate,  engraved  by  Hancock,  as  No.  488.     The   print    is  signed 
"  RH  Worcester,"  and  dated   1757. 

Circular  with  six-lobed  rim.     Above  the  figure  are  two  cupids  holding  a  laurel-wrr.Ttli  and  a 

palm  branch.     Diam.  6|in. 
Compare  No.  48S. 

72.  S.\ucER-SHAPED  Plate,    moulded    in    relief    and    printed    in    black,     .\boiit    1760. 
(Plate  56.) 

Moulded  with  ornament  resembling  feathers  radiating  from  tlie  central  medallion,  in  whiili 
is  printed  a  landscape  with  castles  and  ruins.  Round  the  medallion,  over  the  moulded 
ornament,  is  printed  a  border  of  rococo  scrollwork  and  trees.     Diam.  7  in. 

The  print  in  the  middle  is  a  portion  of  that  which  occurs  again  on  a  cup  in  the  Collection 
(.\o.   125). 

506.  Two  Soup-plates,  painted  in   colours  and  gilt.     About  1775.     (Plate  60.) 

In  the  middle  is  a  bunch  of  llowers  and  fruit  in  natural  colours.  The  rim  has  a  gilt  wavy 
edge,  and  is  decorated  with  an  irregular  border  of  scale  pattern  in  crimson,  edged  with 
gilt  scrolls  from  which  depend  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours.     Each,  diam.  8|-  in. 

These  plates  are  painted  by  the  same  hand  as  two  others  in  the  Collection  (No.  509).  The  work 
of  this  decorator  is  discussed  in  Hobson,   Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  91. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  49,  Porcelain,  fig.   xlv. 

507.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  the  Japanese  style.     Mark,  a  fretted  square 

in  blue.     About  1770. 

In  the  middle  is  a  floral  spray  in  colours,  surrounded  by  a  circular  band  of  underglaze  blue  on 
which  is  a  floral  pattern  reserved  in  white.  From  this  band  four  narrow  panels  radiate  to 
the  wavy  edge,  each  decorated  with  gilt  foliage  on  a  bluish-black  ground  on  which  is  a 
medallion  in  reserve  enclosing  a  flower  in  colours  ;  the  fan-shaped  compartments  between 
the  panels  contain  alternately  an  exotic  bird  perched  on  a  rock  and  a  pair  of  floral 
sprays.  Except  for  the  circular  band  in  the  middle,  the  design  is  painted  over  the  glaze,  in 
red,  yellow,  turquoise-blue  and  lavender-blue  enamel.     Diam.  SfV  in. 

75.  Plate,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     About  1760.     (Plate  61.) 

In  the  middle  is  a  medallion  painted  with  two  figures  in  a  landscape  (the  same  subject  as  occurs 
on  Nos.  115  and  637).  The  rim  is  moulded  in  slight  relief  with  radiating  ribs  interrupted 
by  panels,  bordered  by  scrolls  and  foliage  in  relief,  containing  bouquets  and  sprays  of 
flowers  painted  in  colours.  Round  the  edge  are  also  small  floral  sprays  in  colours.  Diam. 
7?  ■"■ 
A  saucer-mould  with  the  same  pattern  as  this  dish,  in  the  museum  of  the  Roval  Porcelain 
Works  at  Worcester,  is  figured  in  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xiv.  i. 

508.  r^i.ATK,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue,     .'\bout  1770. 

In  the  middle  is  a  circular  medallion  reserved  in  white  and  bordered  by  gilt  foliage  on  a  powder- 
blue  ground,  which  extends  over  the  rim.  In  the  medallion  is  a  bird  perched  among 
flowering  plants  and  rorkwork  in  the  Japane.se  style.  The  rim  has  a  scalloped  edge  and  a 
border  of  gilt  diaper-pattern  and  foliage.     Diam.  y^  in. 

The  pattern  is  the  same  as  that  of  a  service  said  to  have  been  made  for  Sir  Joshua  Revnolds. 
See  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xxxiv.  and  p.  61. 

509.  Two  Plates,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1775.     (Plate  63.) 

ICach  is  painted  in  the  middle  with  a  different  bunch  of  fruit  and  flowers  in  natural  colours. 
The  rim  has  a  gilt  wavy  edge  and  is  decorated  with  a  broad  irregular  border  of  floral 
sprays  in  gold  on  a  turquoise-blue  ground,  edged  inwards  with  gilt  scrolls.  In  the 
interspaces  of  the  border  are  detached  flowers  in  colours.     Each,  diam.  9  in. 

Painted  by  the  same  hand  as  No.  506 ;  see  note  thereon. 


92  WORCESTER. 

510.  Platk,  painted  in  colours  an  1  gilt,   in  pseudo-Oriental  style,     .\bout   1770. 

In  the  middle  are  two  iung-tailed  exotic  birds  among  flowering  plants.  The  rim  has  a  wavy 
edge  and  is  painted  with  a  border  of  close  red  foliage  and  Chinese  trellis-diaper  in 
alternate  compartments  separated  by  gilt  flowers  ;  within  this  border  are  small  sprays  of 
flowers  and  foliage.  The  painting  is  in  red,  green,  yellow  and  blue  enamel  with  small 
touches  of  purple.     Diam.  7IJ  in. 

Burton,  F.nglish  Porcelain,  pi.  iv. 

511.  Pl.\te,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1775.     (Plate  6o.j 

In  the  middle  is  an  exotic  bird  among  bushes.  The  rim  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in 
natural  colours  and  has  a  gilt  wavy  edge.     Diam.  8|  in. 

512.  Two  Plates,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1775.     (Plate  63.) 

In  the  middle  are  scattered  bouquets  and  detached  flowers  in  natural  colours.  The  rim  is 
decorated  with  panels  alternately  coloured  turquoise-blue  and  painted  with  trellis-pattern 
in  red  and  gold.     It  has  a  gilt  wavy  edge.     Each,  diam.  8J  in. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  flg.  50,  Porcelain,  flg.  xlv. 

513.  Two    Plates,  decorated  with    prints    in    lilac    painted    over    in    red,    green    and 

yellow  enamel  and  with  gilding.     About  1770. 

In  the  middle  of  each  is  a  different  landscape  with  ruins  and  trees,  in  one  case  \yith,  in  the 
other  without,  figures.     The  rim  has  a  gilt  scalloped  edge.     Each,  diam.  7J  in. 

[514,  515.  Plates,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  ig.] 

516.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770. 

The  middle  is  painted  with  detached  sprigs  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  The  rim  has  a  gilt 
scalloped  edge,  and  is  divided  into  panels  alternately  coloured  with  bleu  de  rui  enamel  and 
decorated  with  gilt  floral  sprays.     Diam.  6I  in. 

516a.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     The  subject  of  the  painting,  "Spaniel  and 
Wounded  Pheasant,"  is  written  in  red  on  the  back  above  the  mark,  "  Chamberlains 
Worcester  &  62  Piccadilly  London"  {No. ^g),  also  in  red.    1814-1816.     (Plate  68.) 
The  subject,  a  spaniel  appearing  from  under  a  bush  in  pursuit  of  a  pheasant  in  a  wooded  land- 
scape, is  painted  in  an  eight-sided  panel  with  broad  gilt  border,  on   a  pale    salmon-pink 
ground  veined  with  gilding  in  imitation  of  marble.     The  rim  is  encircled  by  a  formal  gilt 
border.     Diam.  gV  in. 
The  panel  is  probably  the  work  of  Humphrey  Chamberlain,  who  died  in  1824  ;  another  plate 
from  the  same  service  is  in  the  British  Museum  {see  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  cvi,  5, 
p.  iji).     The  mark  was  used  from  1814  to  1816,  when   the  London  warehouse  for  .Messrs. 
Chamberlains'  works  was  in  Piccadilly. 

517.  Pair   of   S.\ucer-shaped   Plates,  painted   in   colours   and   gilt  in  imitation  of 

Chinese  porcelain.  Mark,  four  simulated  Chinese  characters  within  a  double 
circle,  in  blue  (No.  47).     About  1770.     (Plate  55.) 

The  decoration  is  identical  with  that  of  the  saucer,  No.  655,  except  that  the  half-chrysanthe- 
mums and  blue  discs  are  here  four  times  repeated.     Each,  diam.  7i  in. 

See  note  on  No.  655.     Other  pieces  of  the  same  service  are  Nos.  614,  619  and  632. 

518.  Two  Plates,  "pencilled"  in  black  in  the  manner  of  Chinese  porcelain  decorated 

with  copies  of  European  engravings,     .\bout  1755.     (Plate  61.) 

The   design   is  made  up   on  each  plate  of  a   Chinaman   riding  a   buffalo,   a   pine-tree,  rocks, 

buildings,  and  a  bird  flying.     Each,  diam.  6|  in. 
A  similar  plate   in  the   Royal   Porcelain    Works  Museum,   Worcester,   is   figured  by   Hobs(m, 
Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  liv.,  fig.   i  ;  see  also  p.  83  of  the  same  work. 


WORCESTER.  93 

519.  Dessert-basket,  with  applied  decoration,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.    About  1770. 

Oval,  with  sides  pierced  in  imitation  of  wickerwork  and  flowers,  coloured  pink,  applied  at  the 
intersections.  At  either  end  is  a  loop  handle  rising  above  the  rim  in  the  form  of  a  twig 
from  which  spring  flowers  and  leaves  in  high  relief  coloured  after  nature.  Inside,  on  the 
bottom,  IS  a  group  of  fruit  painted  in  colours.     H.  4A  in.,  L.  loj-  in.,  W.  8i  in. 

520.  B.\SKET  .\ND  St.\nd,  with  applied  decoration,  printed  and  painted   in  underglaze 

blue.     Mark,  on    the   basket,  a  shaded  crescent,  printed   in    blue.     About  i76q 
(Pl.\te  65.)  '  ^' 

The  basket  is  of  shaped  oval  form  with  wavy  rim,  the  sides  being  pierced  in  imitation  of  wicker- 
work,  with  flowers  applied  at  the  intersections.  .A.t  either  end  is  a  handle  rising  above 
the  nm  m  the  form  of  a  vine-stem  with  leaves  and  bunches  of  grapes  in  relief.  Inside,  on 
the  bottom,  and  in  the  middle  of  the  stand,  is  a  group  of  conventional  fruit  printed  in 
blue.  Both  pieces  are  painted  round  the  inside  with  a  border  of  diaper  and  floral  orna- 
ment m  the  Chinese  style.  The  stand  has  a  shell  handle  at  either  end  and  a  moulded 
edge.     Basket,  H.  34  in.,  L.  9  in.,  W.  7J  in. ;  stand,  L.  io|  in.,  W.  8i  in. 

521.  B.\SKET,  with  applied  decoration,  printed  and  painted  in  underglaze  blue.     Mark, 

a  shaded  crescent  printed  in  blue.     .About  1765. 

Of  shaped  oval  form,  with  wavy  edge,  the  sides  pierced  with  openwork  different  in  design 
from  that  of  No.  520.  .^.t  either  end  is  a  handle  rising  above  the  rim  in  the  form  of 
a  twig,  from  which  spring  flowers  and  leaves  in  high  relief  picked  out  in  blue.  Round 
the  inside  is  a  border  of  diaper  and  floral  ornament  in  the  Chinese  stvle,  also  painted, 
and  on  the  bottom  a  print  of  fruit  from  the  same  plate  as  that  on  No.  520,  with  the 
addition  of  two  butterflies  and  a  detached  spray  of  flowers.    H.  4I  in.,  L.  13  J  in.,  W.  loS  in. 

522.  Pair  of  Baskets,  printed  in  black  and  painted  in  crimson.     About  1760. 

Circular ;  the  sides  are  pierced  in  the  form  of  intersecting  circles  with  rosettes  coloured 
crimson,  applied  on  the  outside  at  the  points  of  intersection.  Similar  rosettes  and 
round  the  bottom  a  border  of  scrolls,  are  also  painted  on  the  inside  ;  on  the  bottom 
IS  a  print  of  a  garden  scene  with  a  girl  dancing  to  the  music  of  bagpipes  played  bv 
a  seated  man.     Each,  H.  2  in.,  diam.  j|  in.  or  r      r-    .  .7 

523.  Bowl,  painted   in    colours   and    gilt.     In    the   middle    are  the  arms  of  Nicholas 

Loftus,  second  Earl  of  Ely  of  the  first  creation  (b.  1738,  succeeded  to  the  title 
1766,  d.  1769).     Mark,  a  fretted  square  in  blue.     About  1766.     (Pl.ate  64.) 

The  sides  are  scalloped  and  decorated  internally  with  gilt  floral  spravs  on  a  dark  powder-blue 
ground  edged  with  gilt  scrollwork.  The  arms  consist  of  a  shield  with  supporters  (two 
eagles,  w-ings  inverted,  argent,  each  charged  on  the  breast  with  a  trefoil  slipped  azure) 
motto  C' LOY  .\L  .-lU  MORI ,  "  sic),  and  earl's  coronet  surmounted  by  a  helmet  bearing  the 
crest  (a  boar  s  head  erased  and  erect  argent  langued  gulesj :  garlands  of  flowers  in  colours 
are  trailed  in  the  interspaces.  The  shield  is  charged  quarterly,  ist  and  4th  grand 
quarters,  quarterly,  ist,  sable  a  chevron  engrailed  ermine  between  three  trefoils  slipped 
argent,  for  Loftus ;  2nd,  azure,  a  clievrnn  between  three  fleamps  or,  for  Chetham  • 
3rd,  or,  a  chevron  gules  between  three  bugle-horns  sable  stringed  azure,  for  Crewkerne  ' 
4th,  gyronny  of  eiglit  argent  and  sable,  a  saltire  engrailed  between  four  fleiirs-de-lvs  the 
stems  converging  towards  the  centre,  all  counterchanged,  also  for  Loftus-  -nd  and  4th 
grand  quarters,  quarterly,  ist,  vert  a  lion  rampant  argent,  for  Hume  ;  2nd,  argent  three 
piles  engrailed  gules,  for  Polworth ;  3rd,  argent  a  cross  engrailed  azure,  for  Sinclair  • 
4th,  argent  three  popinjays  vert,  beaked  and  legged  gules,  for  Peddie,  impaling  quarterlv' 
1st  and  4th,  gules  three  cinquefoils  pierced  ermine  for  Hamilton.  2nd  and  ?rd  areent' 
a  lymphad  sable,  for  Arran.     H.  3I  in.,  diam.  11 J  in  J  6      . 

Nicholas  Loftus  was  son  of  Nfcholas,  the  flrst   Karl,  by  .Mary,  daughter  and  heir  of  Sir  Gustavus 
Hume,   Bart.,   of   Castle   Hume,   co.  Fermanagh.     The   mother  of   the  latter  w^as  Sidney 
daughter  and  coheir  of  James  Hamilton,  of  .Manor  Hamilton,  co.  l.eitrim 
Bought  m  London,  November  ist,  1884,  sec  Journals,  ii,  p.  453,  "  Button  brought  me  a  wonder- 
tuUy  hne  Worcester  deep  dish  or  bowl— with    the  arms  of  the  Elys  upon   it  it   is  a 

noble  piece,  and  though  I   had   to  pay  dear  for  it  (£20)    I  am  very  glad  to'  liave  it  to 
add  to  the  collection     ;  also  illustration  facing  p.  452. 


g^  WORCESTER. 

524.  Pair  of  Shallow    Bowls,  moulded    in    relief   and    painted    in    colours.      About 

1770. 

The  bowls  have  a  wavy  rim  and  are  moulded  with  a  row  of  six  scallop-shells  surrounding 
a  rosette  in  the  form  of  a  striped  tulip  opened  out  and  seen  from  above,  withm  a  lobed 
yellow  border.  The  shells  are  represented  alternately  with  the  outside  and  the  inside 
showing,  in  the  former  case  being  coloured  red  with  details  in  black  after  nature,  in 
the  latter  being  tinted  round  the  edge  in  crimson  and  painted  in  the  middle  with  a 
bouquet  of  flowers  in  colours.  The  interspaces  between  the  shells  are  painted  with  scrolls 
in  black.     Each,  H.  2I  in.,  diam.  gj  in. 

525.  Paii;  of  Dishes,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     About   1770. 

Circular  with  wavy  rim.  Painted  with  bouquets  of  flowers  in  natural  colours,  enclosed  in  a 
circular  medallion  and  in  four  shaped  panels,  which  are  reserved  on  a  ground  of  wicker- 
work  pattern  moulded  in  relief  and  coloured  yellow.  Round  the  nm  is  a  border  of 
flowers  in  colours.     Each,  H.  2}  in.,  diam.  9  in. 

525.  S\VEET.ME.\T-TRAY,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.     About  1770. 

In  the  form  of  three  shells  conjoined,  with  a  mass  of  smaller  shells  in  the  middle  surmounted 
by  a  dolphin  forming  the  handle.  Each  shell  is  painted  with  sprays  of  carnations^  and 
other  flowers  and  an  insect  and  with  a  border  of  Chinese  diaper-pattern.  H.  5J  in., 
W.  9  in. 

527.  Tray,  of  the  form  known  as  the  "  Blind  Earl's  pattern,"  painted  in  colours  and 

gilt.     About  1770. 

Oval  with  scalloped  rim  ;  moulded  with  rose  foliage  and  two  rose-buds,  the  stalks  of  which 
form  loop  handles  at  either  end.  The  middle  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flow_ers ;  the 
rim  has  an  apple-green  border  edged  inwards  with  gilt  scrolls.     L.  5I  m..   W.  45  in.    u> 

This  relief  pattern  is  popularly  supposed  to  have  been  designed  expressly  for  the  Earl  of 
Coventrv  who  became  blind  in  1779,  see  Binns,  Century  of  Potting,  p.  96  ;  as  shown  by 
Hobson,"  however  (Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  47),  though  a  service  of  the  pattern  may  have 
been  ordered  by  the  earl,  it  was  in  existence  long  before  the  date  named  and  was  used 
at  Bow  and  Chelsea  as  well  as  at  Worcester. 

528.  Tray,  of  the  "Blind  Earl's  pattern,"  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,     .\bout  1770. 

Similar  in  form  and  decoration  to  the  last  piece,  from  whicli  it  differs  in  being  circular  instead 

of  oval.     W.  6J  in. 
See  note  on  No.  527. 

529     Pair    of    Trays,  of    the    "  Blind    Earl's   pattern,"    painted   on    underglaze    blue. 
Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue  (No.  39).     About   1770. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  528.  The  rose-buds  and  leaves  are  picked  out  in  blue  and  insects 
are  painted  in   the  intervals  between  them.     Each,  diam.  5I  m.     Set- note  on  No.  527. 

530.  Tray,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  blue.     Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue.     About 
1770. 

Moulded  in  the  shape  of  a  poplar-leaf,  apparently  from  a  cast  of  an  actual  leaf,  and  painted 
with  sprays  of  flowers.     \V.  5}  in. 

[531.   Pair  of  Tr.ays,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p.  159.J 

532.   Dish,  printed  in  black  and  gilt,     .\bout   1770. 

Moulded  in  the  form  of  a  leaf.  In  the  middle  is  a  view  of  a  nilned  monument  with  a  man 
about  to  bathe  in  a  pool  in  the  foreground.  Near  the  edge,  which  is  bordered  with 
a  gilt  line,  are  sprays  of  flowers.     W.  8I  in. 


WORCESTER  95 

533.  Pair  of  Pickle-trays,  printed  in  black.     About  1765. 

Both  are  moulded  in  the  form  of  an  ivy-leaf  and  printed  inside  with  the  same  subject  as  the 
cup  and  saucer,  N'o.  670,  under  which  the  print  is  described.     Each,  W.  3'  in. 

534.  Pair  oi-  Trays,  painted  in  colours.     About   1755.     (Plate  61.) 

Both  are  in  the  form  of  a  conventional  shell  with  wavy  edge  fringed  with  crimson,  and  are 
painted  inside  with  a  bird  flying,  and  another  perched  on  a  rock  amid  flowering  plants 
beside  water.     Each,  H.  2^-  in.,  W.  4^  in. 

535.  Pair  oi-  Custard-cups  and  Covers,  decorated  with  a  design  in  gold  derived  from 

Japanese  porcelain.     About  1765. 

The  design  consists  of  wavy  lines  forming  the  outline  of  the  [Jetals  of  a  (lower.     The  handle 

of  the  covers  is  in  the  form  of  a  rose  with  two  leaves.     Each,  H.  3I  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 
Compare  Hobson,  Worcestcy  Porcelain,  pi.  xxxi.,  \o.   ^. 

536.  Cup  and  Cover,  decorated  with  gilding.     About   1765. 

The  cup  is  semi-ovoid  with  high  foot :  round  the  top  and  round  the  cover,  which  is  sur- 
mounted by  a  handle  in  the  form  of  a  llower  and  leaves,  is  a  row  of  lozenge-shaped 
and  circular  perforations.     H.  4]-  in.,  diam.   2\  in. 

537.  PuKCH-BowL,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.     Mark,    a    fretted    square    in    bkie. 

About   1770.     (Plate  65. j 

The  outside  is  decorated  with  shaped  panels  outlined  by  gilt  rococo  scrolls  and  reserved  in 
white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.  The  two  larger  panels  are  painted  with 
a  group  of  exotic  birds  among  bushes  in  a  landscape,  while  a  similar  group  is  painted 
inside  the  bowl  on  the  bottom.  In  the  smaller  panels  are  single  birds  perched  on 
branches,  or  sprays  of  flowers.  Round  the  rim  inside  is  a  border  of  gilt  conventional 
ornament,  below  which  are  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.   11   in. 

538.  Pi'NXii-BOWL,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,     .\bout   1780. 

Decorated  witli  cornflowers  and  foliage,  arranged  in  two  wreaths  round  the  inside,  and  out- 
side in  a  wreath  round  the  rim  and  in  detached  sprigs  forming  a  diaper  pattern  over 
the  remaining  surface.     H.  5  in.,  diam.   ii-J  in. 

The  pattern  is  known  as  the  "  French "  or  "  .^ngoulenie  sprig  pattern,"  sec  note  on  Derbv 
custard-cups.  No.  .^63. 

539.  PuNCH-BowL,  printed  in  black  and  gilt.     About  1770.     (Plate  58.) 

On  the  outside  is  a  continuous  landscape  with  a  fox-hunt.  Inside  on  the  bottom  is  a  print  of 
a  huntsman  dismounted  blowing  his  horn  and  holding  up  the  dead  fox,  with  the  hounds 
pressing  round  him  ;  on  tlie  sides  are  four  groups  of  hounds  with  various  dead  game. 
The  edge  is  encircled  with  a  gilt  band.     H.  45   in.,  diam.  loj  in. 

Two  of  the  subjects  in  the  interior  occur  on  a  smaller  scale  on  copper-plates  in  the  Royal 
Worcester  Porcelain  Works  Museum  ;  proofs  from  them  accompany  the  Schreiber  Collec- 
tion (.\'o.  1837).  In  the  catalogue  of  a  sale  by  Mr.  Christie  of  Worcester  porcelain  in 
December,  1769,  one  of  the  lots  is  "  A  beautiful  bowl  with  fox  chase,  jet  enamelled,  and 
a  large  jug,  il.  5s."  ;  see  Nightingale,  p.  96. 

787.  Jug,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1760.     (Plate  52.) 

Ovoid    body,    cylindrical    neck    with    projecting    Up    moulded    with    a    mask,  loop    handle. 

Round  the  top  is  a  broad  underglaze  blue  border  veined  with  gold  in  imitation  of  marble; 

the  remaining  surface  is  painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours.     H.  gj  in., 

diam.  5:;  in. 
See  note  on  No.  787a. 


96 


WORCESTKR. 


787a.  Jug,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     .\b()ut   1760.     (Platu  54.) 

Ovoid  body,  cylindrical  neck  with  projecting  lip  moulded  with  a  mask,  loop  handle. 
Round  the  top  is  a  broad  underglaze  blue  border  veined  with  gold  in  imitation  of  marble  ; 
the  remaining  surface  is  painted  with  a  hunting-scene  depicting  three  mounted  men  and  a 
boy  running  with  hounds  in  full  cry  after  a  hare.     H.  9.^  in.,  diam.  5-fV  in. 

The  hunting-scene  is  derived  from  the  same  source  as  that  printed,  probably  at  Liverpool, 
on  an  earthenware  tea-pot  (No.  1108)  in  the  Schreiber  Collection.  The  painting  appears 
to  be  by  the  same  hand  as  that  on  a  bowl  in  the  Dyson  I'errins  Collection,  figured 
in  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  v.,  which  is  believed  to  have  been  painted  by 
Dr.  Wall,  one  of  the  founders  of  the  Worcester  factory.  This  bowl  has  a  blue  and  gold 
marbled  ground  similar  to  the  border  on  the  neck  of  Kos.  787  and  787a.  Other  vases 
with  figure-subjects  and  marbling  in  the  same  style,  in  a  private  collection  in  Lancashire, 
are  traditionally  ascribed  to  Worcester.  The  Schreiber  jugs  were  formerly  attributed  to 
Liverpool. 

788.  Jug,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.     Mark,    "  L "    and    a    short   stroke,    incised. 
About  1760.     (Plate  52.) 

Pear-shaped  with  expanding  neck,  projecting  lip,  and  scrolled  loop  handle.  On  one  side  is 
a  lady  seated  reading  beneath  a  tree,  with  a  gentleman  plaving  a  flute  standing  before 
her,  and  a  dog  lying  on  the  ground  at  his  feet  ;  on  the  other  side  is  a  lady,  also  sitting 
beneath  a  tree,  and  standing  by  her  kr.ee,  a  little  boy  who  holds  a  crested  bird  perched 
on  his  left  hand.  The  figures  are  attired  in  dress  of  the  middle  of  the  iSlh  century. 
On  the  front  are  sprays  of  flowers  and  a  butterfly  in  natural  colours.  Round  the  rim  is 
a  conventional  border  of  Chinese  character  in  red  and  gold.     H.  yj  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

This  piece  has  formerly  been  regarded  as  probably  of  Liverpool  origin,  whilst  Solon 
(English  Porcelain,  p.  80)  ascribes  it  to  Longton  Hall.  The  style  of  the  figure-painting, 
however,  is  similar  to  that  of  Xos.  787,  787a,  whilst  the  flower-painting  approaches  that 
on  a  sauce-boat  in  the  Museum  (No.  3244-1833),  marked  with  a  circle  crossed  by  an 
arrow,  which  is  attributed  to  Worcester ;  the  form  is  that  of  the  printed  jug  No.  546. 

Solon,  pi.  X. 

540.  Jug,  moulded  in  relief,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1765.     (Plate  60.) 

Ovoid  body,  cylindrical  neck,  with  crowned  bearded  mask  in  relief  under  the  lip,  rococo- 
scrolled  handle.  The  body  is  moulded  into  leaf  shaped  panels,  and  painted  with  Chinese 
landscapes  in  crimson  enclosed  within  two  large  and  three  small  quatrefoil  panels, 
reserved  on  a  canary-yellow  ground  on  which  are  sprays  of  chrysanthemums  and  other 
flowers  and  foliage  in  colours  and  gold.  The  neck  is  painted  with  similar  sprays  on  a 
yellow  ground  between  a  band  of  gilt  flowers  and  close  red  foliage  and  a  border  of 
leaves  in  relief  coloured  green  with  red  flowers  between  them.     H.   lOg  in.,  diam.  7A  in. 

Compare  note  on  \o,  484. 

541.  Jug,  moulded  in  relief,  decorated  with  prints    in  lilac,  from  plates  by  Hancock, 

painted  over  in  colours.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  59.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  the  las'  piece,  except  for  the  border  of  relief  ornament  round  the  top 
of  the  neck,  which  is  of  slightly  different  pattern.  On  the  body  are  three  shaped 
panels  outlined  with  crimson  scrolls  and  reserved  on  a  canary-yellow  ground,  which  is 
diversified  with  butterflies  and  other  insects  painted  over  it  at  intervals  in  colours.  The 
panels  enclose  respectively  the  following  printed  subjects  ^ — fi)  a  milkmaid  carrying  a 
pail  on  her  head,  and  another  being  relieved  of  her  p'lil  by  a  man  ;  (2)  a  boy  conversing 
with  a  milkmaid,  who  stands  with  a  yoke  on  her  shoulders  and  pails  beside  her  beneath 
a  tree,  to  the  right  of  w'hich  are  two  cows,  and  to  the  left  a  dog,  copied  from  an 
engraving  by  Francis  Vivares  published  in  1760,  after  a  painting  by  Thomas  Gains- 
borough entitled  "The  Rural  Lovers,"  a  print  of  which  accompanies  the  Collection 
(Xo.  1823) ;  (3)  the  milking-scene  already  described  under  No.  487,  taken  from  ■'  A  view 
of  Woobourn  "  engraved  by  Luke  Sullivan    and   dated  1759.     The  neck   is   painted  with 


WORCESTER.  97 

butterflies  in  colours  on  a  yellow  ground,  between    a  band  of  flowers  in  natural  colours 
and  a  border  consisting   of    leaf   ornament    in    relief    and    roses    in    colours.     H.  iij  in 
diam.  yf  in.  '' 

Compare  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  73.  .^n  engraving  of  the  first  subject  was  published 
by  Robert  Sayer  m  1766  {see  note  on  No.  568J ;  it  appears  on  pi.  89  of  The  Artisfs  Vade 
Mecum. 

97.  Jug,  painted    in    colours    and    gilt,    in    tiie    style    of    Japanese    Kakivemon    ware. 
About  1760.     (Plate  55.) 

Pear-shaped,  with    loop    handle   and  projecting  lip  moulded  with    a  bearded  mask.     On  one 
side  are  a  prufui$-tTee  and  chrysanthemums,  on  the  other  .side  are  other  flowering  plants 
Under  the  lip  are  two  quails,  and    round   the  top  is  a  border    of   close    red    foliage    and 
gilt  flowers.     H.  6|  in.,  diam.  j|   in. 
.\lew,  pi.  V. 

542.  ji'G,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours,     .\bout   1765.     (Plate  62.) 

Ovoid  body,  cylindrical  neck,  loop  handle  with  acanthus-leaf  in  relief.  The  body  moulded 
into  leaf-shaped  panels.  On  the  front  is  a  landscape  with  a  goldfincli  and  other  birds 
perched  on  a  tree  in  the  foreground  and  buildings  in  the  distance.  A  goose  and  other 
birds  flying  are  scattered  over  the  remainder  of  the  body.  Round  the  neck  is  a  border 
of  leaves  in  relief  between  two  bands  of  scrollwork  in  purple.     H.  S^V  in.,  diam.  5^  in. 

For  form  and  manner  of  painting,  this  piece  may  be  compared  with  a  jug,  dated  *  757, 
belonging  to  the  Corporation  of  Worcester,  which  is  figured  in  Hobson,  Worcester 
Porcelain,  pi.  c,   i. 

543.  Ilg,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours,     .-^bout  1755.     (Plate  6o.j 

Pear-shaped  body,  contracted  neck,  e.xpanding  mouth  with  projecting  lip,  scrolled  loop  handle, 
three  small  scrolled  feet  springing  frofn  cabbage-leaves  moulded  in  relief  on  the  body! 
The  body  and  neck  are  divided  by  grooves  into  si.v  lobes;  on  either  side  of  the  former 
is  a  landscape  in  a  shaped  panel  bordered  by  relief  scrollwork  coloured  purple.  Below 
the  lip  is  painted  a  rose,  and  on  the  neck  are  small  insects.  Round  the  rim  is  a  border 
of  leafy  scrolls  in  purple.     H,   7I  in.,  diam.  4„   in. 

544.  juG,  moulded  in  relief,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770.     (Plate  62.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  541.  On  the  front  is  a  medallion  with  a  formal  border  in  turquoise- 
blue  edged  with  gilt  scrolls  enclosing  a  landscape  with  a  river  and  buildings  ;  this  medallion 
is  flanked  by  festoons  of  fruit  in  natural  colours  suspended  from  a  border  of  formal 
ornament  in  hleit  de  rui  and  gold  which  encircles  the  neck.  Bands  of  similar  ornament 
surround  the  shoulder,  passing  over  the  festoons,  and  the  base.  Insects  in  colours  are 
scattered  in  the  interspaces  of  the  design.     H.  8  in.,  diam.  5^  in. 

545.  jfG,  inoulded  in  relief  and  printed  in  black  from  plates  engraved  by  James  Ross. 

On  the  front  of  the  body  are  the  arms  and  emblems  of  the  Freema.sons,  with 
figures  of  three  masons,  and  scrolls  with  the  mottoes  "AMOR  HONOR  ET 
JU.STITIA"  and  "SIT  LUX  ET  LUX  FUIT."     About  1765.     (Pl.vfe  58.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  541.  The  print  on  the  front  is  flanked  by  two  groups  of  ruins,  in  each 
of  which  is  conspicuous  a  pyramid  with,  in  one  case,  a  terrestrial,  in  the  other  a  celestial 
globe  fixed  on  its  apex.  The  neck  is  decorated  on  either  side  with  the  same  print  of  a 
bouquet  of  flowers  tied  with  a  ribbon.  The  lip  has  been  broken  olf  and  replaced  in  silver. 
H.  8  in.,  diam.  jl  in. 
Proofs  from  plates  in  the  possession  of  the  Royal  Worcester  Porcelain  Factory,  of  the  subjects 
with  which  the  jug  is  decorated,  accompany  the  Collection  in  two  sizes,  \os.  1S31,  1832;  the 
smaller  engravings  bear  the  signatures  "J.  Ifoss  Vigoriiiensis  scii(/).,"  and  "J.  Ross  sculp. 
Ross  entered  the  employment  of  the  factory  as  assistant  to  Hancock  in  176^  :  see  Hobson. 
Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  77. 


gS  WORCESTER. 

546.  Jug,  printed  in  black   with  a  bust  portrait  of   King  George  II.  (1727 — 1760)  from 

a  plate  bv  l-Ianrock,  adai)te(l  from  a  portrait,  painted  in  1753,  by  Thomas 
Worlidge,  and  with  other  subjects.  Below  one  of  these  is  the  signature  "R  H 
Worcester,"  with  an  anchor,  the  mark  of  Richard  Holdship.     About   1755. 

Pear-shaped  body,  projecting  lip,  loop  handle.  The  bust  is  placed  on  one  side  of  the  body  ;  on 
tlie  other  is  the  same  print  of  shipping  as  occurs  on  the  dish,  No.  58.  On  the  front,  below 
the  lip,  is  the  signed  print,  inscribed  on  a  scroll  "  Liberty  "  ;  it  represents  a  boy  holding 
a  cap  of  Liberty  on  a  staff,  seated  amidst  military  trophies,  with  a  royal  crown  above  the 
whole.     H.  7j  in.,  diam.  5  in. 

547.  \vc,,  ])rintcd   in   black  from   a  plate  by   Hancock    with   a  half-length  portrait   of 

I''rederick  the  Great,  I'ving  of  Prussia  (b.  1712,  d.  1786),  after  a  painting  by 
Antoine  Pesne,  formerly  in  the  collection  of  the  Princess  Dowager  of  Wales, 
of  which  an  engraving  by  Richard  Houston  accompanies  the  collection 
(No.    1886).     About  1760. 

Bulbous  body,  with  loop  handle,  and  projecting  lip  moulded  in  the  form  of  a  satyr's  mask. 
Above  the  portrait,  which  occupies  one  side  of  the  jug,  is  a  cupid  with  a  laurel  wreath  ; 
below  it  is  the  title  "  KING  OF  PRUSSL-\."  On  the  reverse  side,  and  below  the  lip 
respectively  are  the  figure  of  I'ame  blowing  two  trumpets,  and  the  trophy  of  arms  and 
inscribed  flags,  which  occur  on  the  vase  No.  488  ;  below  the  trophy  is  the  signature 
"  R  H  Worcester."     H.  7  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

See  note  on  No.  488. 

548.  Mug,  printed  in  black  from  the  same  plates  as  No.  547.     Dated   1757. 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  The  prints  occupy  the  same  relative  positions,  and 
bear  the  same  title  and  signature  as  those  on  No.  547.     H.  5^  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

549.  Mug,  printed  in  black  from  a  plate  by  Hancock  with  a  bust  portrait  of  Frederick 

the  Great,  adapted  from  a  painting  by  Pesne.     About  1760.     (Pl.^te  57.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  548.  The  portrait,  placed  on  one  side  of  the  mug,  is  a  slightly 
modified  version  of  the  original,  showing  the  head  and  bust  only,  and  differing  in  other 
details  from  the  print  on  Nos.  547  and  548.  Below  tlie  bust  are  a  ribbon  inscribed  "  The 
ICING  of  PRUSSI.\,  &c.,  Hancock  fecit  Worcester."  and  the  additional  signature  "  R  H 
Worcester"  accompanied  by  an  anchor,  the  mark  of  Holdship.  On  the  reverse  side  of  the 
mug  and  on  the  front  are  the  same  subjects  as  on  No.  548,  of  Fame  and  a  trophy;  from 
the  latter  the  inscribed  flags  and  the  signature  are  omitted.     H.  52  in.,  diam.  4}  in. 

550.  Mug,  printed  in  black  from  the  same  plates  as  No.  547.     Dated  1757. 

Cylindrical  with  loop  handle.  The  signature  of  Hancock  below  the  print  of  the  trophy  of  Hags 
is  accompanied  by  au  anchor,  the  mark  of  Holdship.     H.  4!  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

551.  Mug,  printed  in  black,  with  a  portrait  of  King  George  II.  from  the  same  plate  by 

Hancock  as  No.  546.     .'^bout  1755. 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  The  portrait  is  placed  on  one  side  of  the  mug,  the 
other  being  occupied  by  a  group  of  British  men-of-war,  differing  from  that  on  No.  546. 
On  the  front  is  a  print  of  a  boy  with  a  cap  of  Liberty  from  the  same  plate  as  that  on 
No.  546,  accompanied  by  the  same  signature  and  mark.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 

552.  Mug,  printed  in  black,  with  a  bust  portrait  of  General  Wolfe  (b.   1727,  d.  1759), 

period  v/ith  modifications  from  an  engraving  by  Richard  Houston  after  a  sketch 


WORCESTER.  99 

by  Captain  Harvey  Smith.  The  bust  is  flanked  by  figures  of  Fame  and  .Mars. 
About  1760.     (Pl.\te  59.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle,  .\bove  the  portrait  is  a  cupid  with  a  laurel  wreath.  The  figure 
of  Fame  is  from  a  different  plate  from  that  on  Xo.  488,  being  represented  with  a  single 
trumpet  and  a  laurel  branch.  .Mars  is  shown  seated  and  fully  armed,  with  spear  and  shield. 
H.  5j  in.,  diam.  4  in. 

Probably  made  to  commemorate  Wolfe's  victory  and  death  at  Quebec  in  1759.  Compare 
note  on  Xo.  5. 

553.  Mug,  printed  in  black  from  a  plate  by  Hancock  with  a  bust  portrait  of  General 

John  Manners,  Marquis  of  Granby  fb.  1721,  d.  1770),  copied  from  an  engraving 
by  Richard  Houston,  published  in  1760,  after  a  painting  by  Sir  Joshua  Reynolds, 
now  in  the  collection  of  the  Earl  of  Wemyss.  The  portrait  is  flanked  by  figures 
of  Fame  and  Mars,  from  the  same  plates  as  those  on  No.  552.  About  1760. 
(Pl.\te  59.) 

Cylindrical  with  loop  handle,     .\bove  the  portrait  is  a  rupid  with  a  laurel  wreatli.     H.  6  in., 

diam.  4I  in. 
Probably  made  to  commemorate  the  victory  at  Minden  in   1759. 
Church,  fig.  29. 

554.  Mug,  printed  in  black  with  a  three-quarter  length  portrait  of  .Admiral   Boscawen 

(b.  171 1,  d.  1761),  and  a  shield  with  his  arms,  both  copied  from  an  engraving 
by  John  Faber  the  younger,  published  in  1747,  after  a  painting  by  Allan 
Ramsay  ;  the  portrait  has  been  modified  by  the  addition  of  names,  in  allusion 
to  the  capture  of  Louisbourg  in  1758,  to  the  chart  held  in  the  admiral's  hands. 
About   1758.     (Pl.\tf.  58.) 

Cylindrical  with  loop  handle.  The  portrait  is  on  one  side  ;  the  shield  of  arms,  in  the  midst  of 
a  naval  trophy,  is  on  the  front.  On  the  reverse  side  is  a  print  of  two  men-of-war,  differing 
from  those  on  Xos.  J46  and  551.  The  chart  in  the  hands  of  the  admiral  is  marked  with 
the  names  "  Labrado  "  and  "Louisbu,"  and  is  also  inscribed  "  Louisbourg  "  on  the  rolled-up 
portion.     H.  3I  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 

555.  Mug,  printed  in  black  from  a  plate  by  Hancock  with  a    bust  portrait  of    King 

George  III.  (1761 — 1820),  after  an  engraving  by  James  Mc.\rdell,  dated  1761, 
of  a  painting  by  Jeremiah  Meyer.  The  bust  is  flanked  by  figures  of  Britannia 
and  Fame.     About  1780.     (Pl.\te  58.) 

Bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  Britannia  is  represented  seated  with  spear  and  shield,  and  in 
her  left  hand  a  small  statuette  of  Victory  ;  I'ame  is  depicted  almost  nude,  blowing  a  trumpet 
and  holding  a  second  trumpet  in  her  left  hand.     H.  3J  in  ,  diam.  3j  in. 

A  proof  from  the  plate  of  the  portrait  in  the  pos.session  of  the  Royal  Worcester  Porcelain  Works 
accompanies  the  Collection  (Xo.  1826).  This  plate  was  originally  engraved  about  the  time 
of  King  George's  marriage  in  1761  ;  the  print  on  this  mug  has  the  appearance  of  a  late 
impression.  'Ihe  style  of  the  figure  of  Britannia  also  indicates  that  the  piece  was  made 
towards  the  close  of  the  18th  century.  It  may  have  been  made  to  celebrate  Lord  Rodney's 
victory  at  Cape  St.  \'incent  in   1780. 

556.  Mug,  printed    in  black  from  a   plate  attributed    to   Hancock    with  a  half-length 

portrait  of  William  Pitt,  Earl  of  Chatham  (b.  1708,  d.  1778),  after  a  painting 
bv  William  lloare,  now  in  the  .National  Portrait  Gallery,  of  which  an  engra\ing 
bv  Richard  Houston  accompanies  the  collection.  No.  iS65.  'i'iie  portrait  is 
flanked  by  figures  of  Fame  and  Minerva.     .About  1760.     (Plate  58.) 

Bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  The  figure  of  Fame  is  from  the  same  plate  as  that  on  Xo.  532. 
Minervais  represented  sealel,  with  Gorgon  shield  and  spear.     H.  3J  in.,  diam.  2;  in. 

G  -J 


joo  WORCESTER. 

557    Mug,  printed  in  black.     On  the  front  is  a  print  from  a  plate  attributed  to  Han- 
cock   of  Shakespeare  leaning  on  a  pedestal    decorated  with  busts  of  Henry  \  ., 
Richard  III.  and  Oueen  Elizabeth,  after  the  monument  in  Westminster  Abbey, 
executed  in  1740  bv  Peter  Scheemakers  from  the  design  of  William  Kent.     On 
either  side  are  figures  emblematical  of  Tragedy  and  Comedy.     About   1770. 
Cylindrical  with  loop  handle.     The  poet  is  pointing  at  a  scroll  inscribed— 
"  The  Cloud-capt  Tow     .     .     . 
The  Georgeous  Palac     .     . 
The  Solemn  Temples 
The  Great  Globe  itself 
Yea  all  which  it  inhe     .     .     . 

shall  dissolve 
And  like  y'  baseless 
Fabrick  of  a  Vision 
Leave  not  a  Wreck  behind." 
H.  '1  in.,  diam.  4  in. 

558.  Mug,  printed  in  black  from  plates  by  James  Ross  with  the  same  subjects  as  the 
jug  No.  545.     About  1760.     (Plate  56.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.     H.  si  '"•.  diam.  4^  in.  ,     ^       .  ,  t        1 

Bought  at  Amsterdam  on  August  17th,  1869,  see  Journals,  >.,  p.  33,  "  At  Gaiiz  s  we  have  lound 
...     a  tall  Freemason's  mug,  Worcester,  black  transfer-prmted,  los. 

559    Mug,  printed  in  black  with  a  hunting-scene  from  the  same  plate  as  part  of  the 
subject  on  the  exterior  of  the  punch-bowl,  No.  539.     About  1770. 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

560.  Mug,  printed  in  black  with  subjects  after  Gainsborough  and  Luke  Sullivan  from 

the  same  plates  as  those  on  No.  541.     About  1760. 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.     H.  6  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

561.  Mug,  printed  in  black.     On  one  side  is  a  group  of  two  ladies  and  a  gentleman 

angling  in  a  park,  taken  from  "  A  view  of  the  Canal  and  of  the  Gothic  Tower 
in  the  Garden  of  his  Grace  the  Duke  of  Argyle  at  Whitton,  in  Middlesex,"  drawn 
and  engraved  by  William  W^ooUett ;  on  the  other  side  is  a  print  of  three  ladies 
with  a  fortune-teller,  who  is  accompanied  by  a  boy  and  a  dog,  from  a  plate 
attributed  to  Hancock,  adapted  from  a  painting  by  Antoine  Watteau  known 
as  "  La  Diseuse  d'Avcnture,"  of  which  an  engraving  by  Laurent  Cars  accom- 
panies the  collection  (No.  1824).     About  1760.     (Plate  58.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  The  print  of  the  fortune-teller  differs  from  the  original  by  the 
addition  of  a  man  peeping  from  behind  a  tree  in  the  background,  and  in  ether  details 
H.  4?  in.,  diam.  3Yir  in. 

Compare  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  73.  The  subject  of  "La  Disense  d  Avciitiire  appears 
as  here  represented  on  pi.  84  of  The  Artist's  ]'adc  Meciim. 

562    Mug,  printed   in  black.      On  one    side   is  a   print    from    a    plate  by  Hancock  of 

the    milking   scene  from  the  view    of   Woobourn,  engraved    by  Luke   Sullivan 

and  dated  1759,  which  occurs  on  No.  487  ;  on   the  other  side   is  a   group  from 

a  painting  Icnown  as  "The  Mav   Day,"   by  Francis  Hayman,  formerly   in  one 

of  the  boxes  at  Vauxhall  Gardens.     A  photograph  of  an  engraving  by  Charles 

Grignion  after  the  latter  accompanies  the  Collection,  No.  1825.     About  1760. 

Cvlindrical,  with  loop  handle.     The  "  Mav  Dav  "  group  consists  of  three  milkmaids  dancing 

'     to  the  music  of  a  violin  played  by  a  one-legged  fiddler  and  a  man   in  the  background 

supporting  a  trophy  of  plate  on  his  head.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  3^  m. 


WORCESTER.  loi 

The  "May  Day"  subject  is  explained  in  Sniitli.  Jjook  for  a  Rainy  Daw  pp.  14-16: — "The 
gaiety  during  the  merry  month  of  May  was  to  nie  most  delightful;  my  feet,  though 
1  knew  nothing  of  the  positions,  kept  pace  with  those  of  the  blooming  milkmaids  who 
danced  round  their  garlands  of  massive  plate,  hired  from  the  silversmiths  to  the  amount 
of  several  hundreds  of  pounds  for  the  purpose  of  placing  round  an  obelisk  covered  with 
silk  lixed  upon  a  chairman's  horse.  The  most  showy  flowers  of  the  season  were  arranged 
so  as  to  fill  up  the  openings  between  the  dishes,  plates,  butter-boats,  cream  jugs  and 
tankards.  This  obelisk  was  carried  by  two  chairmen  in  gold-laced  hats,  six  or  more 
handsome  milkmaids  in  pink  and  blue  gowns,  drawn  through  the  pocket-holes,  for  they 
had  one  on  either  side  ;  yellow  or  scarlet  petticoats,  neatly  quilted  ;  high-heeled  shoes  ; 
mob-caps,  with  lappets  of  lace  resting  on  their  shoulders  ;  nosegays  in  their  bosoms  ;  and 
flat  WofTmgton  hats,  covered  with  ribands  of  every  colour.  But  what  crowned  the  whole 
of  the  display  was  a  magnificent  silver  tea-urn  which  surmounted  the  obelisk,  the  stand 
of  which  was  profusely  decorated  with  scarlet-tulips.  A  smart,  slender  fellow  of  a  fiddler, 
commonly  wearing  a  sky-blue  coat,  with  his  hat  profusely  covered  with  ribands,  attended  ; 
and  the  master  of  the  group  was  accompanied  by  a  constable  to  protect  the  plate  from 
too  close  a  pressure  of  the  crowd  when  the  maids  danced  before  the  doors  of  his 
customers. 

"  One  of  the  subjects  selected  by  Mr.  Jonathan  Tyers  for  the  artists  who  decorated  the  boxes 
for  supper-parties  in  Vauxhall  Gardens  was  that  of  milkmaids  on  May-day.  In  that 
picture  (which,  with  the  rest  painted  by  Hayman  and  his  pupil,  has  lately  disappeared) 
the  garland  of  plate  was  carried  by  a  man  on  his  head ;  and  the  milkmaids,  who  danced 
to  the  music  of  a  wooden-legged  fiddler,  were  extremely  elegant.  Thev  had  ruffed  cuffs, 
and  their  gowns  were  not  drawn  through  their  pocket-holes  as  in  my  time  ;  their  hats 
were  flat,  and  not  unlike  that  worn  by  Peg  Wotfington,  but  bore  a  nearer  shape  to 
those  now  in  use  by  some  of  the  fishvvomen  in  Billingsgate.  In  Captain  M.  Laroon's 
'  Cries  of  London,'  published  by  Tempest,  there  is  a  female  entitled  '  A  Merry  Milkmaid.' 
She  is  dancing  with  a  small  garland  of  plate  upon  her  head  ;  and  from  her  dress  I 
conclude  that  the  Captain  either  made  his  drawing  in  the  latter  part  of  King  William  Ill.'s 
reign  or  at  the  commencement  of  that  of  Queen  Anne." 

563.  Mug,  printed  in  black.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  58.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop-handle.  On  one  side  is  the  subject  of  two  milkmaids  and  a  man 
with  pails,  from  a  plate  by  Hancock,  which  occurs  on  \o.  341  ;  on  the  other  is  "  The  May 
Day  "  as  on  No.  562.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

Compare  notes  on  Nos.  541  and  562. 

[564.  Mug,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  23.] 

565.  Mug,  printed  in  black,     .\bout   1765.     (Plate  56.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  either  side  is  a  view  of  classical  ruins.  One  of  these 
with  a  bearded  man  looking  up  at  a  vase  in  the  foreground,  is  a  modified  version  of 
one  of  the  prints  on  the  vase  No.  421,  and  appears  to  be  from  the  same  plate  partially 
recut ;  in  the  other  a  reclining  man  and  a  broken  bas-relief  figure  iMominenllv  in  the 
foreground.     H.  5j  in.,  diam.  4  in. 

566.  Mug,  printed  in  black.     About  1760.     (Plate  58.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  one  side  is  the  subject  of  two  ladies  and  a  gentleman 
angling,  from  the  view  of  Whitton,  by  William  Woollett,  which  appears  on  No.  561  ; 
on  the  other  side  are  figures  of  a  lady  and  gentleman  watching  a  gardener  grafting 
a  tree.     II.  3 J   in.,  diam.  jj   in. 

567.  Mug,  printed  and  painted  in   black,     .\bout   1760. 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  the  front  are  three  ladies  beneath  a  tree  in  a  garden, 
one  standing  and  two  seated  wreathing  flowers  on  hoops.  This  subject  is  flanked  on 
either  side  by  butterflies.     The  handle  is  painted  with  scrolls.     H.  3J  in.,  diam.  2J  in. 


I02  WORCESTER. 

568.  .Mug,  printed  in  black,     .^hout   1770.     (Fi..\te  56.) 

In  the  form  of  an  inverted  truncated  cone.  On  one  side  is  the  subject  from  a  plate  by 
Hancock  of  a  man  with  two  milkmaids  which  occurs  on  the  jug,  No.  541,  and  cup  and 
saucer.  No.  666  :  on  the  reverse  are  a  youth  and  a  young  woman  hurrying  along,  carrying 
the  one  a  hay-rake,  the  other  a  pitch-fork,  in  a  landscape  with  buildings.  H.  3J  in., 
diam.  35  in. 

Engravings  of  both  subjects,  published  by  Robert  Sayer  in  1766,  were  formerly  included  in 
the  Merton  Thorns  Collection,  sold  in  igio.  They  appear  on  plate  89  in  The  Artist's 
Vade  Meciim,  3rd  edition,  published  in   1776,  in  the  Library  of  the  British  Museum. 

569.  Mug,  decorated  with  prints  in  black    washed    over  with    green  enamel.      .-Vbout 

1765.     (Plate  58.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  one  side  is  a  view^  in  the  Dutch  mannf-r,  of  an  inn,  with 
a  man  drinking  at  the  top  of  a  flight  of  steps  and  another  standing  beside  a  barrel.  On 
the  other  side  is  a  girl  on  a  ladder  closing  the  door  of  a  large  bird-coop  mounted  on  stakes 
beside  a  stream ;  in  the  background  is  another  girl  leaning  on  the  rail  of  a  wooden 
footbridge.     H.  3!  in.,  diam.  2I  in. 

570    Mug,  decorated   with  prints  in   lilac  washed  over  with   enamel  colours.     About 
1765.     (Pl.ate  58.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  one  side  is  the  subje.  t  of  a  girl  at  a  bird-coop  which 
appears  on  No.  569.  On  the  other  is  a  view  of  a  cottage  near  a  stone  bridge  over  a 
stream  in  which  two  laundresses  are  washing  clothes  ;  a  boy  leans  blowing  bubbles  over 
the  rail  of  the  bridge.  The  colours  used  are  green,  yellow,  blue,  and  reddish-brown. 
H.  3;   in.,  diam.   2|   in. 

571.  -Mug,  printed  in  blue.      Mark,  a  shaded  crescent    printed  in  blue,  and    "July  31 

1773"  incised  (No.  44).     Dated  1773. 

Cylindrical,  w'ith  loop  handle.     Printed   with  a   carnation  and  other  sprays  of   flowers  and  a 

butterfly.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.  3|  in. 
Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xix,  fig.  4.      The  mark  is  reproduced  in  Chaffers,  Marks  and 

Monograms,  13th  edition,  p.  793. 

572.  Mug,  painted   in  colours  and  gilt.      On   the  front   is  a  shield  with    the  arms  of 

Sir    Bellingham    Graham,    5th    Bart.,    of    Norton-Conyers,    Yorkshire   (d.    1790). 
.\bout  1780. 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  The  shield,  which  is  incorrectly  rendered,  is  charged  quarterly, 
ist  and  4th,  argent,  a  fess  chequy  argent  and  azure,  on  a  chief  azure,  three  escallops  or, 
between  the  two  ordinaries  a  chevronel  gules ;  2nd  and  4th,  argent  a  martlet  or,  charged 
on  the  breast  with  a  fret  sable,  in  its  beak  an  olive-twig  slipped  proper ;  over  all  on  an 
inescutcheon  sable  a  sinister  hand  erect  gules.  Small  detached  sprays  of  flowers  are 
scattered  over  the  remaining  surface  of  the  mug ;  round  the  rim  is  a  gilt  band.  H.  5I  in., 
diam.  4  in. 

This  piece  has  the  appearance  of  having  been  decorated  by  an  enameller  outside  the  Worcester 
factory,  possibly  in  London  The  arms  correctly  rendered  should  be  quarterly,  ist  and  4th, 
or  on  a  chief  sable  three  escallops  of  the  field,  fo'r  Graham  ;  2nd  and  3rd,  or  a  fess  chequy 
argent  and  azure,  in  chief  a  chevronel  gules,  for  Stuart ;  2nd  and  3rd,  per  chevron  embattled 
or  and  azure,  three  martlets  counterchangtd,  two  and  one,  those  in  chief  charged  on  the 
breast  with  a  fret  of  the  first  and  that  in  base  with  a  fret  sable,  for  Wilson  ;  over  all  on 
an  inescutcheon  argent,  a  sinister  hand  erect  gules.  Sir  Bellingham  Graham  niarried 
PTizabeth,  daughter  of  Benjamin  Hudson  by  Elizabeth  daughter  and  heir  of  Thomas 
Wilson,  of  Bridlington.  The  arms  of  Wilson  were  granted  to  the  first-named  lady  in  1766  ; 
she  died  in  1767.  Sir  Bellingham  Graham  died  in  1790,  and  was  succeeded  in  the  title 
by  a  son  of  the  same  name.  The  mug  would  therefore  appear  to  have  been  painted 
between  1767  and  1790.  Its  style  is  against  the  probability  of  its  having  been  made  for 
the  6th  baronet. 

Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  278. 


WORCESTER.  103 

573.  Mug,  painted   in  colours  and   gilt.      On   the   front   is  a  shield  with  the  arms  of 

Martindale,   of    Cumberland.      Under    the    bottom   are    the    initials  "  I    M "    in 
ornamental  characters  and  the  date  "April.  5"'  1770,"  in  gold.     (Pl.a.te  66.) 
Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.     The  shield  is  charged  barry  of  six  argent  and  gules,  over  all 
a  bend  sable ;  it  is  of  rococo  form,  surrounded  by  scrollwork  and  bunches  of  grapes  with 
foliage  in  natural  colours,  and  is  supported  by  a  boy  with  a  blue  scarf  tlirown  over  one 
shoulder,  holding  in  his  right  hand  a  rod  twined  about  with  vine.     A  ribbon  below  the 
shield  bears  the  motto  "MERITE  FORTUNE."     Bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  rich 
gilding  are  distributed  over  the  remaining  surface.     H.  5I   in.,  diam.  4  in. 
Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  27S  ;   Hobson,   Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  .\cviii,  fig.  5. 

574.  Mug,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.      Mark,  a   crescent  in  overglaze  blue  enamel. 

About  1770.    (Plate  65.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  the  front  are  the  initials  "1  S  M"  in  gold  within  a  gar- 
land of  flowers  in  colours  ;  on  either  side  are  bouquets  in  gold.  Round  the  to])  and 
base  are  conventional  borders  in  overglaze  blue  {bleu  de  roi).     H.  0  in.,  diam.  4  in. 

575.  P.\iR  OF  Mugs,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770.     (Pl.\te  65.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  In  front  of  one  are  the  initials  "  D  A  M  C  "  and  of  the  other 
"  J  M  \V,"  in  gold  within  a  wavy  gilt  framework,  intertwined  with  a  wavy  wreath  of 
light  blue  husk-pattern  and  embellished  with  small  sprays  of  Howers  in  colours.  On 
either  side  of  both  mugs  are  a  bow  and  an  arrow  respectively,  each  wreathed  with 
flowers  in  natural  colours.  Small  sprays  are  scattered  over  the  remaining  surfaces.  Each, 
H.  5I  in.,  diam.  3^  in. 

576.  Pair  of  Mugs,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1765.     (Plate  62.) 

Bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  On  either  side  is  a  Chinese  landscape  in  crimson  enclosed 
within  a  quatrefoil-shaped  panel  reserved  on  a  canary-yellow  ground,  on  which  are 
scattered  sprays  of  chrysanthemums  and  other  flowers  in  colours.  Round  the  toji^is  a 
border  of  gilt  flowers  and  close  red  foliage.     H.  5^  in.,  diam.  4',   in. 

Compare  note  on  No.  484. 

577.  Mug,  painted  en  camdieu  in  colours.     On  the  front  is  the  crest  of  Cooke.     About 

1760.     (Plate  62.) 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  The  crest,  painted  in  grey,  with  crimson  scroll- 
work below  it,  consists  of  a  winged  unicorn's  head.  It  is  enclosed  within  a  border  of 
rococo  scrolls  in  lilac,  flanked  on  either  side  by  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  the  same 
colour.     H.  5f  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

578.  Mug,  painted    in    colours.      On    the    front    is    a    shield    of   arms.      About    1760. 

(Plate  62.J 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  The  shield,  argent  a  fess  dancctty  sable  between 
six  billets  ermine,  is  surrounded  by  rococo  scrollwork  in  crimson  against  a  landscape  back- 
ground in  colours,  on  either  side  of  which  are  sprays  of  flowers  en  cama'ieu  in  purple. 
H.  4J  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 

Similar  in  style  of  painting  to  an  armorial  jug,  dated  1757,  belonging  to  tin'  Corjjoration"  of 
Worcester ;  see  note  on  No.  542. 

Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  278. 

579.  Mug,    painted     in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,    a    crescent    in    underglazc    blue. 

About   1770. 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  On  the  front  is  painted  a  classical  urn  within  a  panel  of  gilt 
rococo  scrollwork,  enclosed  by  garlands  of  flowers  in  colours.  Similar  garlands  hang  on 
either  side  of  the  handle  from  a  border  of  diaper  ornament  in  gold  on  an  overglaze  blue 
(fc/fii  de  roi)  ground.  Round  the  base  is  a  border  of  gilt  husk-pattern  on  a  similar  blue 
band.     H.  5J-  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 


104  woRCi':s'i"]':i^. 

580.  Muc,  iKiinted  in  colours  ami  gilt.     Mark  "  IV  "  in  blue  (No.  38).     About   1770. 

Cylindrical  with  loop  handle.     Fainted  with  festoons  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  colours  in  sliapt'd 

■  panels  surrounded  by  gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  (ground  of  dark  blue 
scale-pattern.     II.  4J  in.,  diara.  3!^  in. 

581.  Mio,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,     .\bout   1770.     (Pl.\te  64.) 

Cvlindrical,  with  loop  handle.     The  base   is  encircled  by  a  narrow  border   in  underglaze_blue, 

■  with  Howers  on  a  wavy  stem  reserved  in  white.  Above  this  the  surface  is  divided  into 
vertical  panels  alternately  wide  and  narrow.  The  former  are  painted  in  colours  with 
pseudo-Japanese  flowering  plants  and  monsters  ;  the  latter  are  decorated  with  a  floral  trellis 
reserved  in  white  on  dark  underglaze  blue  ground  over  which  is  a  diaper  of  gilt  scrollwork. 
H.  3j  in.,  diani.  2},  in. 

582.  Ml'g,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1770. 

Cylindrical    with  loop  handle.     Painted  with  e.xotic  birds  and  butterflies  in  two  large  and  two 

■  small  shaped  panels  surrounded  bv  gilt  rococo  scrolls  and  reserved  in  white  on  an  apple- 
green  ground.  Round  the  rim  inside  is  a  green  border  edged  with  gilt  scrolls.  H.  3,  in., 
cliam.  2 1  in. 

582a.  Mug,  painted  m  colours  and  gilt.     About   1770.     (Pl.\te  64.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  Painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  two  large  and 
two  small  shaped  panels,  surrounded  bv  gilt  rococo  scrolls  and  reserved  in  wliite  on  an 
apple-green  ground.  Round  the  rim  is  a  white  border  edged  with  gilt  scrolls.  H.  3J,  in., 
diam.  2f  in. 

583.  MiT,,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770.     (Plate  65.) 

Cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.     On  the  front  is  an   Italian  landscape  with  a  waterfall,  castle. 
'     and  bridge,  in  an  oval  medallion  surrounded  by  a  wreath  of  husk-pattern  in  light  blue  and 
suspended  by  crimson  ribbons.     On  either  side  are  bunches  of  fruit  and  leaves  in  natural 
colours.     H.  3;  in.,  diam.  2^  in. 

584.  Mug,  painted    in    black   outline,    washed    over    with    green    enamel,  and    in    red. 

About    1765.      (PL.1.TE   65.) 

Cvlinchical,  with  loop  handle.     On  the  front  is  a  quatrefoil-shaped  panel  with  red  and  black 
'    border  enclosing  a  landscape  with  a  church  in  black  and  green  ;  on  one  side  of  the  panel 
is  a  pheasant  perched  on  a  spray,  and  on  the  other  side  are  three  birds  flying,  in  the  same 
colours.     H.  3J  in.,  diam.  2^   in.  v  o  r 

A  similar  style  of  decoration  was  in   vogue  at  Chelsea;    compare  \os.  348,  391,  A:c 

585.  Mug,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1765.     (Pl.vte  64.) 

Cylindrical  with  loop  handle.  On  either  side  is  a  Chinese  landscape  in  crimson  enclosed  within 
a  quatrefoil-shaped  panel  reserved  on  a  canary-yellow  ground,  on  which  are  sprays  of 
chrysanthemums  and  other  flowers  in  colours.  Round  the  top  is  a  border  of  gilt  flowers  and 
close  red  foliage.     H.  3]^  in.,  diam.  25  in. 

Compare  note  on  No.  484. 

586.  Mug,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.      Mark,  a  crescent    in    overglaze  blue  enamel. 

About  1780. 

In  the  form  of  an  inverted  truncated  cone.  Round  the  top  is  a  border  of  chevron  pattern  and 
dots  in  gold  on  a  band  of  enamel  blue  {bleu  de  mP) ;  a  plain  band  of  the  same  blue  encircles 
the  base.  Below  the  border  are  festoons  of  crimson  drapery  with  gilt  fringe  hanging  over 
oval  medallions  in  blue  and  gold,  .\bove  each  festoon  is  a  rosette  in  crimson,  blue  and 
gold.     H.  3J  in.,  diara.  3  in. 


WORCESTER.  105 

587.  TiiA-SERVici-;,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1775.     (I'l.\te  66.) 

The  service  consists  of  a  tea-pot  with  cover  and  stand,  milk-jug  and  cover,  sugar-basin  and  cover, 
tea  poy  and  cover,  bread-and-butter  plate,  six  tea-cups  with  saucers,  and  four  coffee-cups. 
The  pattern  consists  of  loose  wavy  garlands  of  green  leaves  and  small  red  berries  depending 
from  the  shoulders  or  rims  of  the  pieces  into  shaped  panels  divided  by  gilt  rococo  scrolls. 
In  the  centre  of  the  plate,  saucers,  tea-pot  stand,  and  covers,  and  round  the  base  of  the 
remaining  pieces  is  a  ring  or  band  of  herring-bone  diaper  pattern  in  crimson.  The  tea-pot, 
milk-jug,  sugar-basin  and  tea-poy  are  ribbed  ;  their  covers  have  knobs  in  the  form  of  an 
applied  conventional  (lower  with  lea%'es  picked  out  with  gilding.  The  tea-pot  is  barrel- 
shaped,  with  nearly  flat  cover,  ribbed  curved  spout  and  loop  handle.  The  milk-jug  is  pear- 
shaped  with  loop  handle,  small  projecting  lip  and  convex  cover  The  sugar-basin  and  its 
cover  are  also  of  convex  form.  The  tea-poy  is  ovoid,  with  narrow  cylindrical  neck  and 
domed  cover.  The  stand  for  the  tea-pot  is  moulded  in  relief  with  the  pattern  of  rose- 
leaves  and  buds  known  as  the  "  Blind  Earl's  pattern  "  (compare  Ko.  527).  The  cups  are 
ribbed,  the  plate  and  saucers  fluted.  Cups,  plate  and  saucers  have  a  wavy  edge.  The  tea- 
cups have  no  handle.  Tea-pot,  H.  4!  in.,  diam.  43:  in.;  stand,  diam.  5^  in.;  milk-jug, 
H.  5  in.,  diam.  3!  in. ;  sugar-basin,  H.  4^  in.  diam.  4f  in.  ;  tea-poy,  H.  6|  in.,  diam.  3|- 
in.;  plate,  diam.  8  in.;  tea-cups,  H.  i|  in.,  diam.  2^^  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4J  in.;  coffee- 
cups,  H.  2j-  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 

Church,  fig.  36  ;  Burton,  English  Porcelain,  pi.   xvi  ;  Dillon,  Porcelain,   1904,  pi.  xlvi. 

588.  Te.\-pot  .\nd  Cover,  painted    in    dark    blue    and  red  and    gilt,    in    imitation   of 

Chinese  porcelain.     Mark,  a  fretted  square  in  blue.     About  1770.     (Pl.\te  55.) 

Globular  body,  curved  spout,  ribbed  loop  handle,  convex  cover  with  cone-shaped  knob.  The 
surface  of  both  pieces  is  divided  into  vertical  panels  painted  with  conventional  floral  and 
scrolled  ornament,  alternately  red  on  white  and  white  outlined  in  gold  on  blue.  H.  6  in., 
diam.  4I  in. 

The  same  pattern,  derived  from  Chinese  porcelain,  appears  also  on  Chelsea-Derby  porcelain  ; 
compare  a  Chinese  cup  and  saucer  in  the  Museum,  No.  3390-1901,  and  a  Chelsea-Derby 
tea-pot  in  the  Schreiber  Collection,  No.  450. 

589.  Te.\-pot  .\i\d  Cover,  painted    in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,  a    crescent    in    blue. 

About  1770.     (Pl.\te  63.1 

Globular  body,  curved  spout,  ribbed  loop  handle,  convex  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of 
an  applied  conventional  flower  with  two  leaves  picked  out  in  gold.  The  decoration 
consists  of  festoons  of  flowers  in  colours  in  large  shaped  panels,  and  sprays  of  foliage  in 
green  or  crimson  in  smaller  panels,  outlined  with  gilt  scrolls  and  reserved  in  white  on  a 
ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.     H.  5}   in.,  diam.  4}  in. 

590.  Te.\-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770.     (Pl.vte  65.) 

Globular  body,  painted  on  either  side  with  an  exotic  bird  perched  on  the  branch  of  a  tree, 
curved  spout,  ribbed  loop  handle.  The  domed  cover  has  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a  flower 
and  is  painted  with  an  insect  and  a  sprig.     H.  55  in.,  diam,  3^  in. 

591.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About  1765. 

Globular  body  painted  with  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers,  fruit  and  insects,  curved  spout, 
loop  handle.     Slightly  convex  cover  with  cone-shaped  knob.     H.  5J   in.,  diam.  4^  in. 

Painted  by  the  same  hand  as  two  tea-pots  and  two  cups  and  saucers  of  Chinese  porcelain  in 
the  Collection  (.Nos.  812,  813,  and  813). 

592.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1775.     (Plate  64.) 

Globular  body,  painted  on  either  side  with  a  group  of  exotic  birds  among  bushes.  The  slightly 
convex  cover  is  painted  with  a  similar  group  and  has  a  pointed  knob.  The  shoulder  of 
the  tea-pot  is  encircled  with  a  scalloped  border  and  the  rim  of  the  cover  with  a  band  of 
trellis-diaper  in  gold.  Kibbed  loop  handle.  The  spout  has  been  broken  off  and  replaced 
by  one  in  silver.     H.  6  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 


io6  WOUCLS'Il'R. 

593.  Ti-.A-POT  AMJ  CovKR,  painted  in  colours  and  >,nll.     About   1775.    (Plate  64.) 

Ribbed  barrel-shaped  body  with  curved  spout  and  wavy  loop  handle,  Hat  cover  with  knob  in  the 
form  of  an  applied  conventional  Hower  with  two  leaves  picked  out  in  gold.  On  either  side 
of  the  body  and  surrounding  the  attachment  of  the  spout  are  sprays  of  llowers  in  natural 
colours.  On  the  shoulder  is  a  band  of  trellis-diaper  in  black  on  a  turquoise-blue  ground, 
edged  with  gilt  rococo  scrolls,  which  is  continued  over  the  edge  of  the  cover.  H.  5  in., 
diam.  4^;  in. 

594.  Tka-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770.    (Plate  63.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  589.  Round  the  shoulder  of  the  tea-pot  and  the  edge  of  the  cover  is 
a  border  of  trellis-diaper  in  gold  on  a  ground  of  overglaze  blue  enamel  (bleu  de  rot)  edged 
with  gilt  rococo  scrolls.  Respectively  below  and  within  this  border  arc  groups  and 
scattered  bunches  of  fruit  in  natural  colours.     H.  6^   in.,  diam.  5I  in. 

595.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  overglaze  blue  enamel  and  gilt.      About     1770. 

(Plate  63.) 

Cvlindrical  body  with  short  straight  spout  and  loop  handle  in  the  form  o£  two  inter- 
twined stems  with  foliage ;  conve.v  cover  with  handle  in  the  form  of  a  bent  twig.  Both 
body  and  cover  are  painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  blue.  The  handle, 
spout,  and  edges  are  picked  out  with  gilding.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  4*  in. 

"  .4  complete  tea  and  coffee  equipage,  with  twisted  handles  beautifully  enamelled  in  natural 
groupes  of  blue  flowers,  gilt  edges  forty-three  pieces  3!.  13s.,"  was  one  of  the  lots  in  the 
sale  of  the  factory  at  Messrs.  Christies  in  December,  1769  ;  see  Nightingale,  Contributions, 
p.  98. 

[596.  Tea- pot,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p.   159.] 

597.  Tea-pot    and    Cover,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt,    in    imitation    of    Japanese 

Kakiyemon  porcelain.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  55.) 

Fluted  bulbous  body  with  curved  spout  and  ribbed  loop  handle,  convex  cover,  also  fluted,  with 
bulb-shaped  knob.  On  either  side  of  the  body  are  a  dragon  Hying  among  clouds  and 
insects  above  a  pair  of  crabs  and  flowering  plants,  in  red,  light  enamel  blue,  yellow  and 
freen.  The  crabs  and  plants  are  repeated  on  the  cover.  Round  the  shoulder  and  round  the 
edge  of  the  cover  is  a  narrow  band  of  close  red  foliage  with  gilt  flowers  at  intervals. 
H.  6  in.,  diam.  5J-  in. 

598.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1765. 

Bulbous  body,  with  curved  fluted  spout  and  loop  handle,  convex  cover  with  knob  in  the  form 
of  an  applied  flower  and  leaves  picked  out  in  colours.  On  the  body  and  cover  are 
bouquets  and  scattered  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.     H.  6^  in.,  diam.  5  in. 

599.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  fretted  square  in  blue. 

About   1770.     (Pl.\te  55.) 

Fluted  bulbous  body  with  curved  spout  and  ribbed  loop  handle,  convex  cover  with  knob  in 
the  form  of  an  applied  flower  with  two  leaves  picked  out  in  colours.  On  either  side  of 
the  body  is  a  design  of  conventional  chrysanthemums  and  a  fish-like  dragon  in  red, 
(lark  enamel  blue,  green,  yellow  and  gold  in  the  pseudo-Japanese  style.  Round  the 
shoulder  and  round  the  edge  of  the  cover  is  an  irregular  turquoise-blue  border  broken  at 
intervals  by  reserves  with  trellis-diaper  in  red  and  edged  with  gilt  rococo  scrolls.  Within 
this  border  on  the  cover,  and  on  the  spout,  are  small  chrysanthemum-sprays.  H.  5I  in., 
diam.  5}  in. 

600.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1775.     (Plate  64.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  589.  On  either  side  of  the  body  is  an  exotic  bird  perched  on  a 
branch,  and  on  the  cover  are  a  sprig  of  foliage  and  an  insect,  all  in  colours  against  a 
ground  of  close  wavy  gilt  stripes  which  cover  the  whole  of  the  body  and  the  outer  part 
of  the  cover.  The  spout,  of  which  the  top  has  been  broken  off  and  replaced  in  silver,  is 
decorated  with  leaf-ornament  in  gold.     H.  5^^  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 


WORCESTER.  107 

601.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1770. 

Similar  in  form  to  No.  591.  On  either  side  of  the  body  are  exotic  birds  among  bushes  in  a 
large  fan-shaped  panel,  flanked  by  butterflies  in  four  circular  medallions,  reserved  in 
white  on  a  powder-blue  ground,  which  is  enriched  with  gilt  chrysanthemum-sprays.  The 
cover  is  similarly  decorated.  The  spout  is  left  white  and  painted  with  formal  ornament 
in  crimson.     H.  jj  i"-.  diam.  4J   in. 

Of  the  same  pattern  as  No.  658. 

602.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  blue  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  fretted    square  in  blue. 

About   1770. 

Fluted  bulbous  body  with  curved  ribbed  spuut  and  loop  handle  in  the  form  of  two  inter- 
twined twigs,  convex  cover,  also  fluted,  with  knob  in  the  form  of  an  applied  flower 
with  two  leaves  painted  in  colours.  The  flutings  of  both  body  and  cover  are  alternately 
coloured  with  enamel  blue  {bleu  de  ni),  and  decorated  with  garlands  of  flowers  in  gold 
on  the  white  ground.     H.  5j  in.,  diam.  5J  in. 

Nos.  516  and  6j6  belong  to  the  same  set. 

603.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  with  gilt  decoration.     About   1775.     (Plate  64.) 

Barrel-shaped  body  with  ribbed  curved  spout  and  wavy  loop  handle,  nearly  flat  cover  with 
round  knob.  On  one  side  of  the  body  are  the  initials  "  E  T  '  in  monogram  among 
leafy  spirals  within  a  shaped  panel  bordered  by  rococo  scrollwork  and  hung  with  festoons ; 
above  the  panel  is  perclied  a  bird,  and  on  either  side  of  it,  seated  each  with  a  bird 
flying  above  him  on  a  branch  of  the  scrollwork,  are  cupids  engaged  respectively  in 
sounding  a  conch-shell  and  in  blowing  bubbles.  On  the  reverse  side  is  a  group  of  small 
birds  perched  on  low  trees  with  cottages  in  the  background.  The  shoulder  is  encircled 
by  a  border  of  trellis-diaper  broken  by  rosettes  in  compartments.  A  similar  border  on 
the  cover  encloses  two  birds  on  a  branch.  The  spout  is  decorated  with  a  cornucopia 
full  of  flowers.     H.  j|  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

604.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  fretted  square  in  blue. 

About  1770.     (Pl.ate  6j.) 

Similar  in  form  to  No.  589.  The  surface  of  the  body  is  divided  by  broad  powder-blue 
bands  into  four  panels,  which  are  painted  in  colours  in  the  Japanese  style  with  birds 
among  rockwork  or  flowering  plants.  On  the  blue  bands,  amidst  gilt  foliage,  are  oval 
medallions  in  reserve  enclosing  floral  sprays.  Round  the  middle  of  the  cover  and  above 
the  foot  is  a  narrow  band  of  flowers  on  a  wavy  stem  reserved  in  white  on  a  blue  ground. 
The  outer  part  of  the  cover  is  divided  by  radial  powder-blue  bands  into  four  panels 
with  floral  ornament  in  colours  similar  to  that  on  the  body.     H.  6}  in.,  diam.  j/'j  in. 

The  pattern  is  that  of  a  service  said  to  have  been  made  for  Sir  Josluia  Reynolds  ;  compare 
note  on  No.  508. 

605.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  imitation  of  Sevres  porcelain. 

Mark,  "  li'"  in  blue.     .About   1775. 

Of  the  same  form  as  .\o.  593.  The  sides  of  the  body  are  painted  with  garlands  ol  green 
leaves  and  red  berries,  hanging  between  vertical  bands  of  trelliswork  in  crimson  and 
gold,  from  a  band  in  blue  enamel  {hleii  de  rot)  edged  with  gilding  which  encircles  the 
shoulder.  The  base  is  decorated  with  a  border  of  cell-pattern  in  black  on  a  green  band 
edged  with  gilt  scrolls.  The  cover  is  similarly  ornamented  with  a  bleu  dc  rot  band,  garlands, 
and  trellis,  and  green  cell-pattern  arranged  concentrically  round  the  knob.  H.  45  in., 
diam.  4}  in. 

N'os.  613,  621,  644  and  657  belong  to  the  same  service.  The  pattern,  known  as  the  "hop- 
trellis  "  pattern,  is  copied  from  Sfevres  porcelain  ;  a  Sivres  tea-pot  in  the  Museum  decorated 
in  this  manner  (\o.  C.  188 — 1913)  bears  the  date-letter  for  1704.  Compare  Hobson, 
Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  99. 


i„S  WORCESTER. 

606.  ■ri;.v-i'()T  AND  CovKR,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1770.     (Pl.\te  63.J 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  581).  The  decoration  consists  of  conventional  clirysanthcmums  and 
other  flowering  plants  in  psevido-Japanese  style,  in  red,  green  and  yellow,  in  large  and 
small  shaped  panels,  outlined  with  gilt  scrolls  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  ground  of 
dark  blue  scale-pattern,     H.  .iij  in.,  diam.  4J!  in. 

607.  rK.\-roT    AND    CovKR,  printed    and    painted    in    blacl<.     On    one    side  is    a   pr'mt 

after  a  French  original  of  the  subject  known  as  "  L'Ainutir,"  from  a  plate 
by  Hancock,  signed  "R  H  Worcester";  the  signature  is  accompanied  by  an 
anchor,  the  mark  of  Holdship.     About  1760.     (Plate  56.) 

Bulbous  body,  with  curved  octagonal  spout  and  ribbed  loop  handle,  slightly  convex  cover 
with  knob  in  the  form  of  an  applied  flower  with  two  leaves.  The  subject  "L'Amoiir" 
represents  a  gallant  on  a  garden-seat  beside  a  lady,  whose  hand  he  leans  forward  to  kiss. 
Another  lady  stands  behind.  In  the  foreground  are  a  spaniel  and  a  garden  roller,  and 
in  the  background  a  fountain  with  a  statue  of  Neptune  in  his  chariot.  The  print  on 
the  reverse  side  of  the  bodv  depicts  a  lady  and  gentleman  dancing  in  a  landscape  to 
the  tune  of  a  fiddle  played  'by  another  gentleman  who  is  seated.  The  cover  is  printed 
with  views  of  a  ruin  and'  a  windmill.  Interlaced  ornament  is  painted  on  the  handle  and 
spout.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 

For  the  prints  see  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  73  ;  also  Ballantyne,  p.  5,  where  reference 
is  made  to  a  print  by  a  French  engraver  with  French  verses  beneath,  from  which  the 
subject  is  copied. 

608.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  decorated   with   prints    in   purple    painted   over    in   colours 

and  with  gilding.  On  one  side  is  the  same  subject  as  appears  on  No.  489, 
copied  from  an  engraving  by  Francis  Vivares,  published  in  1752,  after  a 
painting  dated  1701  by  Pierre" Antoine  Patel.  Mark,  a  fretted  square  in  blue. 
About  1770.     (Pl.\te  58.) 

Globular  body  with  curved  foliated  spout  and  loop  handle  in  the  form  of  two  intertwined 
steins,  slightly  convex  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of  an  applied  flower  with  two  leaves 
painted  in  colours.  The  print  after  Vivares  is  described  under  .\o.  489.  On  the  other 
side  is  a  ruined  columned  structure  near  a  river,  with  a  church  beyond  it ;  in  the 
foreground  are  a  lady  and  two  gentlemen.  Three  small  views  of  ruins  decorate  the 
cover.  .\  panel  of  rococo  ornament,  uncolouied,  is  printed  on  the  spout.  H.  6  in., 
diam.   y^  in. 

609.  Tea-pot    and    Cover,  decorated   with  prints    in   purple  painted  over    in   colours 

after  a  design  by  Jean  Pillement.     About  1765.     (Plate  56.) 

I'he  body  is  of  slightly  depressed  globular  form  ;  in  other  respects  the  form  is  the  same  as 
that  of  No.  jS8.  The  print,  repeated  on  either  side  of  the  body,  represents  a  Chinese 
boy  standing  beside  a  rococo  branch  on  which  another  boy  sits  astride  with  a  bow  at  the 
end  of  a  stick  in  his  hands  ;  to  the  left  is  a  flowering  tree,  and  in  the  background  are 
seen  buildings  and  water.  The  cover  and  spout  are  also  decorated  with  small  prints 
of  rococo  scrolls  and  buildings.     H.  5  in.,  diam.  4;   in. 

For  the  print  compare  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelaiu,  pi.  1,  fig.  2,  p.  85.  The  figures  appear 
also  on  a  bottle  in  the  collection,  No.  482. 

115.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     About  1760. 

Globular  body  moulded   in    slight   relief  with  vertical   ribs    interrupted  on  either   side   by  a 

panel,  bordered  with  scrolls    and  foliage    coloured   crimson,  containing  a  landscape  with 

two  figures  painted  in  colours.      Round    the    shoulder,  on  the  curved   spout,  and  on    the 

cover  are  sprays  of  flowers.     H.  jj  in.,  diam.  5^  in. 
The  cover  is  not    that   originally  made  for  the  tea-pot.      The  figure-subject    appears  also  on 

the  cups  and  saucers,  No.  637. 


WORCESTER.  109 

118.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About   1755.     (Plate  61.) 

The  body  and  cover  are  moulded  with  broad  vertical  bands  in  slight  relief,  interrupted  by 
panels  enclosed  by  rococo  scrolls  and  painted  with  Chinese  figures  in  landscapes.  The 
tea-pot  has  a  loop  handle,  curved  spout  painted  with  a  spray  of  liowers,  and  four  small 
scrolled  feet  ;  the  spout  has  been  broken  and  repaired  with  a  silver  nozzle.  H.  j}  in., 
diam.  4^   in. 

719.  Te.\-pot    and    Cover,    moulded    in    relief,  jjainted    in    colours  and  gilt.      About 
1760.     (Plate  6i.) 

Barrel-shaped  body  with  ribbed  loop  handle  and  curved  spout,  flat  cover  with  l;not  in  the  form 
of  an  applied  flower  and  two  leaves  painted  in  colours.  Between  two  horizontal  bands  of 
foliated  scrollwork  in  relief,  picked  out  in  crimson,  which  encircle  the  body,  are  on  one  side 
a  conventional  Chinese  landscape  with  a  figure  of  a  man  fishing,  on  the  other  a  branch  of 
a  fruit-tree  in  blossom,  both  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.  A  wreath  of  similar 
crimson  scrollwork  on  the  cover  encloses  the  knob  and  two  painted  sprays  of  flowers; 
another  floral  spray  is  painted  on  the  S])out.  H.  4^  in.,  diam.  3|  in. 
One  half  of  the  body  is  from  the  same  mould  as  that  of  another  tea-pot  in  the  .Museum 
(Xo.  3243-igoi),  decorated  in  blue  only,  which  bears  the  mark  resembling  "TF  "  in  mono- 
gram ;  compare  note  on   No.   35. 

610.  Coffee-pot  a.vd  Cover,  printed   in  black.     On  one  side  of  tiic  body  is  the  sub- 

ject of  "  'l"he  Tea  Party,"  from  a  plate  by  Hancock  ;  on  the  other  is  a  group 
from  a  painting  by  Antoine  Watteau  known  as  "  La  Diseuse  d'Aventure." 
About  1760.     (Plate  57.) 

Pear-shaped  body  with  long  curved  spout  printed  witli  rococo  scrollwork,  and  loop  handle  ;  the 
slightly  convex  cover  has  a  knob  in  the  form  of  an  applied  (lower  with  two  leaves  and  is 
decorated  with  the  same  views  of  ruins  as  are  printed  on  the  cover  of  No.  608.  The  prints 
of  "  The  Tea  Party"  and  the  "  Disease  d'Aventure"  are  fully  described  under  N'os.  500  and 
561.     H.  8i   in.,  diam.  45   in. 

611.  CoiEEH-POT  AND  CovER,  printed   iu   black.     On  one  side   is  the  subject  known  as 

"  L'Amoiiy,"  from  a  plate  by  Hancock.     About  1760. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  610,  e.Kcept  that  the  cover  is  highly  domed.  The  subject  of 
"  L' Amour"  is  fully  described  under  No.  607.  The  print  on  the  reverse  represents  a  ladv 
watering  fiowers  in  a  garden  in  wliich  are  two  large  ornamental  vases.  The  spout  is 
printed  with  rococo  scrollwork.  On  the  cover  are  two  landscapes  with  ruins.  H.  8'  in., 
diam.  4^  in. 

[612.   CoEEEE-POT,   Liverpool  porcelain,  sec  p.   152.  | 

613.  MiLK-jfG,  painted   in   colours  and  gilt,   in  iniitation  of  Sevres   porcelain.     .Ybtnit 

1775.     (Plate  63.) 

Kibbed  pear-shaped  body  with  projecting  lip,  scalloped  rim,  and  wavy  loop  handle.  The  body 
is  painted  with  garlands  of  green  leaves  and  red  berries  hanging  between  vertical  bands  of 
trelliswork  in  crimson  and  gold,  from  a  border  in  blue  enamel  (bleu  de  roi)  edged  with  gilding  ; 
a  similar  border  encircles  the  base.     H.  43   in.,  diam.  y^  in. 

See  note  on  No.  6o> 

614.  .MiLK-jLc;    .\Nn    Cover,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt,    in    iniiialicin    of    Chinese 

porceL'iin.  Mark,  fi\e  simulatetl  Chinese  characters  within  a  doiibh'  circle,  in 
blue.     .'Xbout   1770. 

Pear-shaped  body  with  projecting  lip  and  loi.p  handle,  domed  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of  an 
applied  llcAver  with  two  leaves  painted  in  colours.  Half-chry.santlieniums  with  petals 
diversely  painted  in  red,  blue,  green    and  gold    project    downwards  from  the    edge    and 


no  WORCESTER. 

upwards  from   the  base.     Between  these   are  three  dark  blue  discs  with  gilt  trellis-diaper. 
Two  similar  discs  decorate  the  cover.     The  edge  ot  the  cover  and  the  base  are  encircled  bv  a 
narrow  band  of  flowers  on  a  wavy  stem  reserved  in  white  on  a  blue  ground.     H.  53  in., 
diam.    j,-'j  in. 
Xos.  517,  610,  632  and  655  belong  to  the  same  service.     See  note  on  Xo.   r.55. 

615.  Mii.K-jUG    AN'D    CovKR,  painted    in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,  a  fretted  square  in 

blue.     About  1770.    (Pl.\te  63.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  Xc.  61.1..  The  decoration  consists  of  two  exotic  birds  in  colours  in  large 
shaped  panels  and  insects  in  smaller  ones  which  are  outlined  with  gilt  rococo  scrolls  and 
reserved  in  white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.     H.  55  in.,  diam.  3i  in. 

616.  Cream-jug,   moulded  in    relief    and    painted    in  blue.      Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue. 

About  1765. 

Of  the  same  form  as  a  Chelsea  cream-jug  in  the  Collection  (No.  379).  The  exterior  is  painted  on 
one  side  with  conventional  flowers,  and  on  the  other  with  trellis-pattern  in  the  Chinese 
style  edged  with  foliated  scrolls.     H.  3^  in.,  W.  4;  in. 

617.  Crham-jug,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  blue.     About   1760.     (Pl.\te  61.) 

He.Kagonal,  with  wavv  rim,  projecting  lip  and  scrolled  loop  handle.  .\  Chinese  landscape  with 
buildings  and  a  bridge  is  moulded  in  low  relief  on  the  outside ;  the  inside  is  painted  with 
floral  sprays  and  on  the  bottom  with  the  Chinese  character  yueh  ("moon")  reversed. 
H.  2f  in.,  W.  4^  in. 

618.  Cream-jug,  moulded    in  relief   and   painted  in  blue.     Mark,  a   crescent   in  blue. 

About  1760.     (Pl.ate  61.) 

Barrel-shaped,  with  projecting  lip  and  scrolled  loop  handle.     -\  rosette  hanging  from  a  ribbon  is 
moulded  on   the  front  between   two   leafy  scrolls.     Round  the  top  and  the  base  are  painted 
borders  of  Chinese  cell-pattern.     H   2j  in.,  diam.  2]  in. 
Hobson,   Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xvi,  fig.  3. 

619.  Tea-poy    axd    Cover,    painted    in    colours   and    gilt,    in    imitation    of    Chinese 

porcelain.     Mark,  four  simulated  Chinese  characters  within  a  double  circle,  in 
blue.     About  1770. 

Ovoid  bodv,  high  foot,  narrow  cylindrical  neck,  convex  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of  an 
applied  flower  and  two  leaves  painted  in  colours.  Half-chrysanthemums  with  petals 
diversely  painted  in  red,  blue,  green  and  gold,  project  downwards  from  a  line  round  the 
shoulder  and  upwards  from  the  base.  Between  these  are  four  dark  blue  discs  with  trellis- 
diaper  in  gold.  Two  similar  discs  decorate  the  cover.  The  edge  of  the  cover  and  the  base 
are  encircled  by  a  narrow  band  of  flowers  on  a  wavy  stem  reserved  in  white  on  a  blue 
ground.     H.  6J  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 

Nos.  517,  614,  632  and  635  belong  to  the   same  service.     See  note  on  No.  655. 

620.  Tea-poy  and  Cover,  printed  in  grey  with  the  same  subjects  as  No.  611.     About 

1765.     (Plate  56.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  Xo.  619.  On  the  cover  are  two  small  views  of  ruins.  1 1.  6J  in.,  diam. 
3  in. 

621.  SuGAR-BOWL  AND  CovER,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1775. 

Of  ribbed  convex  form ;  the  cover  has  a  wavy  edge  and  a  knob  in  the  form  of  an  applied  gilt 
flower  with  two  leaves.  Both  bowl  and  cover  are  painted  with  garlands  of  green  leaves  and 
red  berries,  respectively  hanging  and  pointing  inwards  from  a  border  of  blue  enamel  (bleu 
de  roi)  edged  with  gilding,  h  similar  border  encircles  the  base  of  the  bowl  and  forms  a  ring 
round  the  knob  of  the  cover.     H.  4'  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 

See  note  on  No.  605. 


WORCESTER.  iii 

622.  SuGAR-BOwr.  .\xd  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.    Mark,  a  fretted  square    in 

blue.     About   1770. 

Of  convex  form,  with  ogee-domed  cover  surmounted  by  a  knob  in  the  form  of  an  applied  flower 
with  two  leaves  painted  in  colours.  Both  pieces  are  decorated  in  colours  with  exotic  birds 
among  bushes  in  shaped  panels  and  insects  in  smaller  panels  bordered  with  gilt  scrollwork 
and  reserved  in  white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.     H.  4I  in.,  diam.  .^|  in. 

623.  PoRxroN  OF  .\  Service,  consisting  of  sugar-basin  and  cover,  milk-jug,  cake-plate, 

spoon-tray,  two  tea-cups  and  saucers  and  two  coffee-cups,  printed  in  black  with 
the  subject  known  as  "  L' Amour,"  from  a  plate  by  Hancock.  The  print  on  the 
cake-plate  is  signed  "R  H  Worcester";  the  signature  is  accompanied  by  an 
anchor,  the  mark  of  Richard  Holdship.     .About   1765. 

On  the  cover  of  the  sugar-basin,  which  has  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a  flower,  are  two  groups 
of  ruins.  The  milk-jug  is  pear-shaped,  with  projecting  lip,  curved  rim,  and  loop  handle 
rising  to  a  sharp  point.  The  spoon-tray  is  oblong  with  six  scalloped  sides.  The  tea- 
cups have  no  handles  and  are  printed  inside  on  the  bottom  with  swans. 

Sugar-basin,  H.  4}  in  ,  diam.  4I  in.  ;  milk-jug,  H.  3S  in.,  diam.  2\  in. ;  cake-plate,  diam. 
6f  in. :  spoon-tray,  L.  6J  in.,  W.  3I  in.;  tea-cups,  H.  i|  in.,  diam.  3  in.;  saucers,  diam. 
4I  in. ;  coffee  cups,  H.  2',  in.,  diam.  2^  in.     Compare  No.  607. 

624.  P.\iR  OF  B.\sixs,  painted  in    colours  and   gilt,  with    the  "quail  pattern"   in    the 

style  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon  ware.     About  1765.     (Pl.\te  55.) 

Reeded,  with  scilloped  rim.  Painted  on  the  outside  with  two  quails,  a  flowering  prunus  tree, 
and  other  plants,  and  inside  with  a  floral  spray  on  the  bottom  and  a  border  of  gilt  con- 
ventional flowers  among  close  red  foliage  round  the  rim.     Each,  H.  2§  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

625.  B.\si.N-,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  crescent  in  red.     About  1770. 

The  outside  is  painted  in  colours  with  pairs  of  exotic  birds  among  bushes  in  three  fan-slia])cd 
panels  and  insects  in  three  circular  medallions  between  them.  The  panels  and  medallions 
are  enclosed  by  gilt  borders,  from  which  spring  sprays  of  llowers  also  in  gold,  and  are 
reserved  in  white  on  a  powder-blue  ground.  Inside  on  the  bottom  are  butterflies  and 
other  insects  in  colours.     H.  2I  in.,  diam.  6  in. 

626.  Bowl,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue.     About   1770. 

Fluted,  with  wavy  edge.  On  the  outside  are  two  wreaths  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  twined 
round  a  bow  and  an  arrow  respectively,  and  a  third  wreath  in  the  form  of  a  true  lover's 
knot.  Round  tlie  edge  is  a  border  of  blue  enamel  (bleu  de  rof),  with  gilt  scrolls  and 
pendants.     H.  3  in.,  diam.  f)J   in. 

Compare  No.  631. 

627.  Basin,  printed    in    black,  with    subjects    fnni    plates    bv  Hancock,    each    signed 

"  R.  Hancock  fecit."     About   1765. 

The  outside  is  decorated  with  the  following  prints:— (1)  A  gentleman  standing  by  a  gate 
in  conversation  with  a  milkmaid,  who  carries  a  pail  on  her  head  ;  {2)  three  haymakers 
beneath  a  tree,  a  man  sitting  and  another  standing,  both  with  forks,  and  a  woman 
seated  with  a  rake;  (3)  the  subject  of  milkmaids  and  a  man  which  occurs  on  No.  341. 
Inside  on  the  bottom  is  a  group  of  three  swans.  H.  2f  in.,  diam.  6  in. 
1  he  third  of  the  figure-subjects  occurs  in  an  engraving  published  by  Robert  Sayer  in  1776 ; 
see  note  on  No.  568. 

628.  Basin,  printed  in    black.     On  the    outside  is    the  subject   known  as  "  L'Amoiir," 

from  a  plate  by  Hancock,  signed  "  R  H  Worcester  "  ;  the  signature  is  accom- 
panied by  an  anchor,  the  mark  of  Richard  Holdship.     .Vbout   1765. 

Tlie  subject  '•I.'Amotir"  is  described  under  .No.  607.  The  outside  is  further  decorated  with 
three  other  prints  :  (i)  .\  lady  and  gentleman  seated  on  the  ground  in  a  landscape,  watching 
the  gambols  of  two  dogs  ;  (2)  a  small  domed  building  with  twisted  columns;  (3)  a  statue 
on  a  pedestal.     Inside  is  the  same  print  of  swans  as  on  No.  627.     H.  2J  in.,  diam.  6  in. 


,,2  WORCESTER. 

629.  I'k.^-pot  St.\nd,  printed  in  black.     About   1765.     (Plate  58.) 

Hexagonal,  witli  fluted  rim.  I'riiitod  in  the  middle  with  the  view  of  an  inn  wliich  occurs  on 
No.  569.     Diam.  5'   in. 

630.  Tk.x-pot  Stand,  printed  in  black  from  a  plate  by  Hancock,  signed  "  R.  H.  fecit  " 

and  painted  in  the  same  colour.     About  1765.     (PL.vrE  58.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  629.  The  print  depicts  two  Chinamen  reclining  beneath  an  awnmg 
stretched  over  a  platform  of  woodwork  and  masonry.  The  rim  is  painted  with  a 
border  of  Chinese  trellis-diaper  broken  by  bands  enclosing  llowers.     Diam.  5J  \n. 

The  print  appears  on  pi.   178  of  The  Ladiea'  Amusemcvt. 

631.  Tea-1'OT  Stand,  painted  in  colours  and  decorated  with  gilding.     Mark,  a  crescent 

in  black  enamel.     About   1770. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  629.  A  conventional  border  in  blue  enamel  {bleu  de  roi)  and  gold 
is  painted  on  the  rim.  In  the  middle  is  a  floral  spray  in  the  same  colours,  withm  a 
medallion  surrounded  by  three  wreaths  of  flowers  in  colours,  one  in  the  form  of  a  true 
lover's  knot,  the  others  twined  about  a  bow  and  an  arrow.     Diam.  5J  in.    . 

Compare  No.  626. 

632.  Tea-pot  Stand,  painted  in  colours  and    gilt,  in  imitation  of  Chinese  porcelain. 

Mark,    five   simulated    Chinese    characters    within    a     double    circle,    in    blue. 
About  1770. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  629.  Four  half-chrysanthemums,  with  petals  diversely  painted  m 
red,  blue,  green  and  gold,  project  inwards'  from  the  edge  of  the  rim.  A  chrysanthemum 
in  gold  outline,  with  red  and  green  centre,  occupies  the  middle,  within  a  narrow  circular 
band  of  tlowers  on  a  wavy  stem  reserved  in  white  on  a  blue  ground;  in  the  intervals 
are  four  blue  discs  with  gilt  trellis-diaper.  Diam.  6  in. 
Nos.  517,  614,  619  and  655  belong  to  the  same  service.     See  note  on  No.  655. 

633.  Tea-pot    Stand,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.        Mark,    a    crescent    in    blue. 

About  1770. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  629.  Round  the  rim  is  a  border  of  chain-pattern  in  gold  on  a 
band  of  blue  enamel  Wen  de  voi)  edged  with  gilt  scrolls.  In  the  middle  is  a  small 
river-scene  painted  in  colours  in  a  medallion  surrounded  by  a  border  of  turquoise-blue 
husk-pattern  ;  beyond  this  are  three  garlands  of  flowers  with  butterflies  between  in  natural 
colours.     Diam.  6  in. 

634.  Spoon-tray,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.    About  1755.   (Pl.\te  6i.j 

Oval,  moulded  with  floral  sprays  laid  over  radial  reeding,  which  is  interrupted  by  small 
shaped  panels  painted  with  Chinese  figures  in  landscapes  or  flowers.  Roui.d  the  rim  is 
a  border  of  scrolls  in  crimson.     L.  5I  in.,  W.  3j  in. 

635.  Spoon-tray,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.         Mark,    a    fretted    square    m    blue 

(No.  42).     About  1770. 

Of  oblong  hexagonal  form,  with  scalloped  rim.  .A.t  either  end  is  a  lozenge-shaped  panel 
painted  in  colours  with  an  exotic  bird  among  bushes  ;  between  and  in  the  middle  are 
insects  in  smaller  panels.  The  panels  are  bordered  with  gilt  scrollwork  and  reserved  in 
white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.     L.  5^  in.,  W.  3^  in. 

636.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  "IT"  in  blue.     About 

1775- 

Both  pieces  fluted  witli  scalloped  edge.  The  cup  is  decorated  outside  and  the  saucer  inside 
with  a  bleu  de  roi  border  edged  with  gold  ;  below  this  is  a  wavy  garland  of  green  leaves 
with  red  berries  twined  about  a  crimson  line.  Inside  the  cup  on  the  bottom,  and  in 
the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  gilt  circle  enclosing  detached  leaves  and  berries.  Cup, 
H.  2}  in.,  diam.  3fJ  in.;  saucer,  diam.  5^  in. 


WORCESTER.  113 

637.  T\V(i  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted  in  colours.     About  1760. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  six-lobed,  with  brown  wavy  edge  and  border  of  floral  ornament 
moulded  in  slight  relief.  Outside  the  cups  are  two  shaped  panels  and  in  the  middle  of 
the  saucers  another  similar  panel,  all  painted  with  the  same  subject  of  two  figures  in 
costume  of  the  period  in  a  landscape  with  trees  and  buildings.  The  remaining  surfaces 
are  decorated  with  bouquets  or  sprays  of  flowers.  The  cups  have  no  handles.  Cups, 
H.   i^   in.,  diam.   2}  in.;  .saucers,  diam.  4ff  in. 

A  similar  cup  and  saucer  are  figured  in  Hobson,  Worcestey  Porcelain,  pi.  Ivii,  i.  The  subject 
appears  also  on  a  tea-pot  in  the  Collection,  No.  115. 

638.  Two   Tea-cups  .ksu  Saucers,  painted  in  colours  and   gilt,  in   the  Japanese  style. 

About  1770. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  fluted,  with  wavy  edges.  The  surface  of  the  cups  outside  and  of  the 
saucers  inside  is  divided  into  four  large  panels,  separated  by  narrower  panels,  which  radiate 
from  a  narrow  band  with  flowers  on  a  wavy  stem  reserved  in  white  on  a  ground  of  underglazc 
blue.  The  narrow  panels  are  decorated  with  a  red  chrysanthemum  among  gilt  foliage  on  a 
ground  of  powder-blue.  The  large  ones  enclose  alternately  chrysanthemum-plants  and 
branches  of  pruiuis-hlossom  in  colours  and  gold.  Inside  the  cups  and  in  the  middle  of  the 
saucers  is  also  a  conventional  chrysanthemum.  The  cups  have  no  handles.  Cups,  H.  i|  in., 
diam.  3^^  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  4f  in. 

639.  Two  Tea-cups  a\d  Saucers,  painted  in  colours.     About  1765.     (Plate  55.) 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  octagonal,  the  sides  being  alternately  painted  with  flowering  plants 
in  red  and  green  in  the  Japanese  style,  and  plainly  coloured  with  powder-blue.  Inside  the 
cups  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  is  a  red  flower.  The  cups  have  no  handles.  Cups, 
H.   i|  in.,  diam.   if  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4^  in. 

640.  Two  Tea-cups,  moulded  in  low  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     About   1765. 

Moulded  outside  with  a  broad  band  of  conventional  flowers  and  foliage  on  a  continuous  wavy 
stem  in  relief  washed  over  with  yellow  enamel.  Above  this,  round  the  rim,  is  a  border  of 
scrolls  in  crimson  interrupted  by  sprigs  of  flowers  in  colours.  Inside,  on  tlie  bottom,  is  a 
rose-bud  in  natural  colours.     The  cups  have  no  handles.     Each,  H.  ij  in.,  diam.  3i  in. 

641.  Two   Tea-cups   and  Saucers,  painted   in  colours  with  the  "quail    pattern"   in 

imitation  of  Japanese  Kakiyemon  porcelain.     Mark,  a  crescent  in  red  (No.  41). 
About  1765.     (Plate  55.) 

Outside  the  cups  and  inside  tlie  saucers  are  two  quails  among  flowering  plants.  Inside  both  cups 
and  saucers  is  a  narrow  border  of  small  yellow  flowers  among  close  red  foliage.  The  cups 
have  no  handles.     Cups,  H.  ij  in.,  diam.  ig  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4I  in. 

642.  Tea-cup    and    Saucer,    painted    in   colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  crescent  in  blue. 

About  1770. 

Both  pieces  fluted,  with  scalloped  edges.  Inside  the  cup  on  the  bottom,  and  in  the  middle  of 
the  saucer  is  a  landscape  within  a  border  of  foliage  in  turquoise-blue.  Outside  the  cup  and 
on  the  rim  of  the  saucer  are  groups  of  flowers  and  butterflies  in  colours  below  a  formal 
border  in  blue  enamel  (bleu  de  roi)  and  gold.  The  cup  has  no  handle.  Cup,  H.  ij  in., 
diam.  3I  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  5^  in. 

643.  Two    Tea-cups    and    Saucers,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.        About    1765. 

(Plate  55.) 

The  cups  are  decorated  outside  and  the  saucers   inside  with  figures  of  Chinese  children   among 
plants  or  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  shaped  panels  outlined  by  gilt  scrolls  and  reserved  in 
white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.     The  cups  have  no  handles.     Cups,  H.  i|  in., 
diam.  2j  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  4g  in. 
X     192:.9  H 


114  WORCESTER. 

644.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  crescent,  on  the  cup 
in  gold  (No.  40),  on  the  saucer  in  blue  enamel  over  the  glaze.     About  1775. 
Both  pieces  are  Huted  and  have  a  scalloped  edge.     The  cup  is  decorated  outside  and  the  saucer 
inside  with  pendant   garlands  of  green  foliage  and   red   berries   alternating  with  vertical 
or  radial  bands  of  trelliswork  in  crimson  and   gold  which  connect  horizontal   bands  of 
formal  ornament   in   bleu   de  roi   and  gold.     The  cup  has  no  handle.     Cup,  H.   ifl  in., 
diam.  3  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  j  in. 
See  note  on  No.  605. 

545_  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  moulded  in  relief,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt. 
About  1765. 

The  cups  are  decorated  outside  and  the  saucers  inside  with  a  broad  band  moulded  in  relief  with 
conventional  flowers  and  foliage  on  a  continuous  wavy  stem  ;  round  the  rims  inside  is 
painted  a  border  of  closely  set  flowers  and  foliage  in  the  style  of  the  Chinese  famille  rose. 
Inside  the  cups  on  the  bottom,  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  is  a  parrot  perched  on  a  wreath 
of  flowers  and  vine  with  grapes.  The  cups  have  no  handles.  Cups,  H.  ij  in.,  diam.  3I  in. ; 
saucers,  diam.  5I  in. 

A  block  for  the  mould  from  which  these  cups  are  taken  is  in  the  museum  of  the  Royal  Porcelain 
Works,  at  Worcester,  see  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xiv.,  8  ;  a  tea-service  "  enameVd  in 
parrots"  was  sold  at  Christie's  in  December  1769,  see  Nightingale,  Contributions,  p.  98. 

646.  Two  Tea-cups,  painted  in  dark  underglaze  blue  and  gilt.  Marked  with  double 
"  L  "  in  blue  enamel  in  imitation  of  Sevres  porcelain  and  with  the  date  in 
gold  (No.  46).     Dated  1782. 

Both  are  reeded  and  have  no  handle.  They  are  decorated  outside  with  a  conventional  border 
in  blue  and  gold  from  which  hang  gilt  festoons  and  inside  with  a  floral  spray.  Each, 
H.  i|  in.,  diam.  35^  in. 
Bought  at  Bordeau.x,  October  22nd,  1875,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  371,  "  The  Savers  have  not  nearly 
such  a  good  stock  as  they  had  previously,  but  we  found  a  little  Battersea  etui  with  them, 
and  two  very  curious  Worcester  cups,  bearing  a  forged  Sfevres  mark  and  (in  gold)  the 
date  1782."     See  also  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  p.  134,  and  mark  No.  128  on  p.  190. 

547.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  decorated  with  a  design  in  gold  derived  from 
Japanese  porcelain.     About  1765. 

Both  pieces  are  decorated  with  wavy  lines  forming  the  outline  of  the  petals  of  a  flower.     The 

cups  have  no  handles.     Cups,  H.  if  in.,  diam.  2^  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4I  in. 
The  decoration  is  the  same  as  that  of  No.  535 ;  see  note  thereon. 

648.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1775. 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  fluted  and  have  a  gilt  scalloped  edge.  The  cups,  which  have  no 
handles,  are  painted  outside  with  bunches  of  fruit  in  colours  below  festooned  scrolls  in 
gold,  and  with  another  group  of  fruit  inside  on  the  bottom.  The  saucers  are  decorated 
with  similar  scrolls  and  bunches  surrounding  a  central  group.  Cups,  H.  ij  in.,  diam. 
2f  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  4!  in. 

649.  Two  Tea-cups,  Coffee-cups,  and  Saucers,  painted  in  black  and  turquoise-blue 

and  gilt.     About  17S0. 

Each  piece  is  painted  round  the  rim  with  a  border  of  beading  and  rosettes  en  grisaille  on  a 
turquoise-blue  band.  Tea-cups,  H.  if  in.,  diam.  3  in. ;  coffee-cups,  H.  2|  in.,  diam.  2J-  in. 
saucers,  diam.  45  in. 

650.  Two    Tea-cups    and   Saucers,    painted    in   colours   and    gilt.     Mark,    a    fretted 

square  in  blue.     About   1770. 

The  cups  are  painted  outside,  the  saucers  inside  with  exotic  birds  among  bushes  and  with 
insects  in  colours,  in  shaped  panels  bordered  with  gilt  scrollwork  and  reserved  in  white 
on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.  The  cups  have  no  liandles  and  are  painted  inside 
each  with  a  butterfly.     Cups,  H.  if  in.,  diam.  2|  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4I  in. 


WORCESTER.  115 

651.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1770. 

The  cups  are  painted  outside,  the  saucers  inside  with  exotic  birds,  among  bushes  in  three  fan- 
ihaped  panels,  separated  by  insects  enclosed  in  small  circular  medallions.  The  panels 
and  medallions  are  reserved  in  white  on  a  powder-blue  ground  over  which  are  laid 
conventional  floral  sprays  in  gold.  The  cups  have  no  handles.  Cups,  H.  i^\  in.,  diam. 
2|  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  4/^  in. 

652.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  crescent  in 

blue.     About  1770. 

The  cups  are  decorated  outside  and  the  saucers  inside  with  festoons  of  flowers  and  small  sprigs 
in  shaped  panels  outlined  with  narrow  gilt  lines  and  reserved  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue 
scale-pattern.  Inside  the  cups  on  the  bottom  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  is  a  rose-bud. 
The  cups  have  no  handles.     Cups,  H.  if  in.,  diam.  2j-  in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  45  in. 

653.  Two  Coffee-cups  and  S.a.ucers,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  the  Chinese  style. 

About  1765. 

The  cups  are  painted  outside  and  the  saucers  inside  with  three  figures  of  Chinese  divinities 
holding  emblems,  one  of  them  seated  against  a  rock.  Round  the  rim  of  the  cups  inside, 
of  the  saucers  outside,  is  a  narrow  border  of  gilt  cresting.  Cups,  H.  2J  in.,  diam.  2-J-J  in.  ; 
saucers,  diam.  4JJ  in.,  4^  in.  respectively. 

654.  Two  Coffee-cups,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  fretted  square   in   blue. 

About  1770. 

On  either  side  of  both  is  an  exotic  bird  standing  by  a  bush,  in  colours  in  a  large  shaped  panel  ; 
srnaller  intervening  panels  are  painted  witfi  insects,  all  the  panels  being  outlined  with 
gilt  scrollwork  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.  Each, 
H.  2l  in.,  diam.  2j  in. 

655.  Two    Coffee-cups   and  Saucers,  painted  in   colours   and  gilt,    in    imitation  of 

Chinese  porcelain.     About   1770. 

Three  half-chrysanthemums,  with  petals  diversely  painted  in  red,  blue,  green  and  gold,  project 
inwards  from  the  edge  on  the  rim  of  the  saucers.  A  chrj'santhemum  in  gold  outline,  with 
red  and  green  centre,  occupies  the  middle  within  a  narrow  circular  band  of  flowers  on  a 
wavy  stem  reserved  in  white  on  a  blue  ground ;  in  the  intervals  are  three  blue  discs  with 
gilt  trellis-diaper.  On  the  lower  side  of  the  rim  are  two  sprays  of  chrysanthemums  in  red 
and  blue.  The  cups  are  decorated  with  similar  motives,  a  half-chrysanthemum  on  either 
side  pointing  downwards  from  the  rim  and  another  on  the  front  point  upwards  from  the 
narrow  band  of  flowers  which  encircles  the  base  ;  three  blue  discs  decorate  the  interior. 
Cups,  H.  2i  in.,  diam.  2VV  in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  5j  in. 

A  Chinese  cup  and  saucer  of  the  same  pattern  is  figured  in  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain, 
pi.  xxviii,  fig.  I.  Other  pieces  belonging  to  the  same  service  are  \os.  517,  614,  6iq, 
and  632. 

656.  Two  Coffee-cups  and  Saucers,  painted   in    colours   and  gilt.     Mark,  a   fretted 

square  in  blue  (No.  43).     .'\bout  1770. 

Both  the  cups  and  the  rims  of  the  saucers  are  fluted,  with  wavy  edge.  The  flutings  arealternatelv 
painted  with  overglaze  bleu  dc  rot  enamel  and  decorated  with  pendant  garlands  of  flowers  iii 
gold.  Inside  the  cups  on  the  bottom  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  are  detached  sprigs  of 
flowers  in  natural  colours.  The  handles  of  the  cups  are  in  the  form  of  gilt  intertwined 
twigs.     Cups,  H.  2I  in.,  diam.  2|J  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  5^   in. 

657.  Coffee-cup  and  Saucer,   painted   in   colours  and   gilt,    in    imitation    of  Sevres 

porcelain.     About  1775. 

Both  pieces  are  fluted  and  have  a  scalloped  edge.     The  cup  is  decorated  outside  and  the  saucer 
inside  with  pendant  garlands  of  green  foliage  and  red  berries,  alternating  with  vertical  or 
radial  baiidsof  trelliswork  in  crimson  and  gold  which  connect  horizontal  bands  of  formal 
ornament  in  bleu  de  roi  and  gold.     Cups,  H.  2,",,  in.,  diam.  al  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  5J  in. 
See  note  on  No.  605. 

H  •-' 


ii6  WORCESTER. 

658.  Two  Chocoi,ate-cups,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,     .\bout   1770.     (Plate  64.) 

On  the  outside  are  exotic  birds  among  bushes  in  three  fan-shaped  panels  separated  by  insects 
enclosed  in  small  circular  medallions,  reserved  in  white  on  a  powder-blue  ground,  which  is 
enriched  with  gilt  chrysanthemum-sprays.  The  cups  have  each  a  single  handle.  Each, 
H.  2j  in.,  diam.  2^  in. 

Of  the  same  pattern  as  No.  601. 

659.  Two    Chocolate-cups   and    Saucers,    painted    in    colours   with    the    so-called 

"  partridge   pattern "  in  imitation   of   Japanese    Kakiyemon   porcelain.     About 
1765.     (Plate  55.) 

The  cups  are  inverted  bell-shaped  and  have  no  handles,  the  upper  part  being  lobed,  with  wavy 

edge.     The  high  rim  of  the  saucers  is  similarly  lobed.     The  cups  are   painted  outside  and 

the  saucers  inside  with  two  quails  beside  a  blossoming  plum-tree  and  other  (lowering  plants. 

Inside  both  cups  and  saucers  is  a  narrow  border  of  small  gilt  flowers  among  close  red  foliage. 

Cups,   H.   2|   in.,  diam.  3J   in.;  saucers,   diam.   jj   in. 

660.  CiiocoLATE-cup  AND  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770. 

The  cup  is  inverted  bell-shaped  and  has  two  scrolled  loop  handles,  the  upper  part  being 
lobed,  with  gilt  wavy  edge.  The  high  rim  of  the  saucer  is  similarly  lobed.  The  cup 
is  decorated  outside  and  the  saucer  inside  with  garlands  of  flowers  in  natural  colours 
within  two  shaped  panels,  alternating  with  sprays  in  small  circular  medallions;  the 
panels  and  medallions  are  outlined  in  black  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  canary-yellow 
ground.  Inside  both  pieces  is  a  border  of  crimson  scrolls  interrupted  by  sprigs  of 
flowers  in  colours.  On  the  bottom  of  the  cup  inside  is  a  rose-bud.  Cup,  H.  2f  in.,  diam. 
3I  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  jf  in. 

661.  Chocolate-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  fretted  square 

in  blue.     About  1770.     (Plate  63.) 

The  cup  is  inverted  bell  shaped  and  has  two  openwork  scrolled  loop  handles,  the  upper  part 
being  lobed,  with  gilt  wavy  edge.  The  high  rim  of  the  saucer  is  similarly  lobed.  The  cup 
is  decorated  outside  and  the  saucer  inside  with  pseudo-Chinese  figures  playing  musical 
instruments  in  the  style  of  Watteau,  in  colours  in  large  shaped  panels,  separated  by  exotic 
birds  or  sprays  of  flowers  in  smaller  panels,  outlined  with  gilt  rococo  scrolls  and  reserved  in 
white  on  a  ground  of  dark  blue  scale-pattern.  Inside  the  cup  is  a  border  of  gilt  trellis-pattern 
and  scrollwork.     Cup,  H.  2|  in.,  W.  5I  in. 

662.  Chocolate-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1775. 

Botli  pieces  are  lluted,  with  gilt  scalloped  edge.  The  cup  is  painted  outside  and  the  saucer  on 
the  rim  with  festoons  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  tied  with  blue  ribbons.  A  spray  of 
flowers  occupies  the  middle  of  the  saucer  and  the  inside  of  the  cup.  The  cup  has  two 
scrolled  loop  handles.     Cup,  H.  3J  in.,  diam.  4  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  65  in. 

663.  Chocolate-cup,  Cover  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  imitation  of 

Japanese  Imari  ware.     Mark,  four  simulated  Chinese  characters  within  a  double 

circle,  in  blue.     About  1770.     (Plate  63.) 

The  cup  and  saucer  are  of  the  same  form  as  No.  660;  the  domed  cover  has  a  knob  in  the 
form  of  an  applied  flower  with  two  leaves  painted  in  colours.  All  three  pieces  are  decorated 
with  vertical  or  radiating  panels  enclosing  various  diaper  designs  or  floral  sprays  ;  the 
panels  are  broken  at  intervals  by  conventional  chrysanthemums.  Inside  the  cup  on  the 
bottom  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  twisted  branch  of  primus  blossom.  Outside 
the  saucer  are  two  peony-sprays  in  red  and  blue.  Cup  and  cover,  H.  5^^  in.,  W.  4I  in. ; 
saucer,  diam.  j|  in. 
A  Japanese  dish  with  the  same  pattern  is  figured  in  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  xxvii,  i. 


WORCESTER.  117 

664.  Coffee-cup,  printed  in  brown.     About  1765. 

The  print  depicts  two  ladies,  one  of  whom  is  having  her  fortune  told  by  an  old  woman  with  a 
baby  holding  a  toy  windmill  slung  on  her  back :  a  boy  stands  behind  the  fortune-teller, 
whilst  a  country  house  is  seen   in   the  background.     H.  2f  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 

664a.  Saucer,  printed  in  lilac  with  a  group  of  classical  ruins  amongst  which  are  seen 
the  so-called  Temple  of  Minerva  Medica,  the  Pyramid  of  Caius  Cestius,  and  the 
obelisk  in  the  Piazza  del  Popolo,  at  Rome.     About  1765. 

In  the  foreground  is  an  urn  on  a  pedestal  beside  a  small  tree.     Diam.  4I  in. 

665.  Two  Te.\-cups  .\nd  S.\ucers,  printed  in  black,     .-^bout  1770. 

Biith  cups  and  saucers  are  lluted,  with  scalloped  edges  coloured  black,  and  are  printed  with  a 
loose  bunch  of  flowers  and  detached  sprays.  The  cups  have  no  handles.  Cups,  H.  i|  in. 
diam.  2f  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  4!  in. 

666.  Te.\-cup  and  Saucer,  printed  in  black  with  a  group  of   a  man  and    two   milk- 

maids after  a  plate  by  Hancock,  and  other  subjects  ;  below  the  print  on  the 
saucer  is  the  signature  "Hancock  fecit."     About  1765. 

The  figure-subject,  which   is   described   under  Nos.  541  and  568,  is  printed  on  the  saucer  and 
on   one  side  of  the    cup  ;  on  the   reverse    side    of  the  cup  is  a  group  of  three  cows,   and 
inside  it  on  the  bottom  is  a  swan.     Cup,   H.   i|  in.,  diam.  25  in,  ;  saucer,  diam.  4^  in. 
Compare  note  on  No.  568. 

667.  Two    Tea-cups   and    Saucers,   printed    in   black   with    the    subject   known    as 

"  L'Amour,"  from  a  plate  by  Hancock.  Below  the  prints  on  the  saucers  are 
the  signatures  "  R  H  Worcester,"  accompanied  by  an  anchor,  the  mark  of 
Holdship,  and  "  R.  Hancock  fecit,"  respectively.     About  1765. 

The  subject  of  the  print   is   described  under  No.    607.     The  cups  have  no  handles  and  are 

printed   inside   on   the    bottom    with    a   swan.      Cups,  H.    ig  in.,  diam.  25  in.;    saucers, 

diam.  4^  in. 

668.  Coffee-cup  and  Saucer,  printed  in  black  with  the  subject  known  as  "  The  Tea 

Party,"  from  a  plate  by  Hancock.  Mark,  crossed  swords,  in  imitation  of  the 
mark  of  the  Meissen  factory,  and  "9.,"  in  blue  (No.  45).     .Vbout   1765. 

"The  Tea  Party,"  described  under  No.  500,  occupies  one  side  of  the  cup,  while  on  the  reverse 
is  a  print  of  a  waiting-maid  and  a   page   bringing   a  plate  and  a   kettle.     The  handle 
is  composed  of  two  intertwined  stems.     Cup,  H.  2J  in.,  diam.  2J  in.;  saucer,  diam.  5  in. 
Compare  note  on  No.  500. 

[669.  Cup  and  S.aucer,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.  26.] 

670.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer,  printed  in  black.     About  1765. 

The  print  on  the  saucer  depicts  a  gentleman  teaching  a  lady  to  play  the  fiiite.  They  are 
seated  on  the  ground  near  a  monumental  fountain  which  is  surmounted  by  an  urn  ;  a 
loggia  and  a  beacon  by  the  sea-shore  are  seen  in  the  distance.  This  subject  is  repeated 
on  the  outside  of  the  cup,  the  fountain  and  the  remainder  being  detached  and  printed 
separately  on  opposite  sides  ;  inside  on  the  bottom  is  a  small  view  of  a  ruin.  The 
cup  has  no  handle.  Cup,  H.  il  in.,  diam.  3  in.;  saucer,  diam.  4I  in. 
These  pieces  approach  in  thinness  the  "eggshell"  porcelain  of  China.  .A  similar  saucer  is 
figured  in  liobson.  Worcester  Pnrcelitiii.  pi.  li,  fig.  3;  compare  note  thereon  on  p.  85.  .Ml 
engraving  of  the  figure-subject  (which  occurs  also  on  the  pickle-trays  No.  533)  published 
by  Robert  Sayer  in  1766,  was  formerlv  included  in  the  Merton  Thoms  Collection,  sold 
in   1910. 


ii8  WORCESTER 

671.  TiCA-cup  AND  Saucer,  printed  in  lilac.     About   1765. 

On  one  side  of  the  cup,  which  has  no  handle,  is  a  river-scene  with  a  stone  bridge  on  which 
are  three  men  hshing,  one  of  them  with  a  casting-net ;  on  tlie  other  side  is  a  landscape 
with  distant  hills.  The  saucer  is  printed  with  a  view  of  a  river  witfi  ruined  buildings, 
and  figures  in  the  foreground.     Cup,   H.   ij   in.,  diam.  3  in.;  saucer,  diani.  4!   in. 

124.  Tea-cup    and    Saucer,  decorated    with    prints    in    lilac   painted  over  in  colours. 

About  1765.     (Plate  58.) 

On  one  side  of  the  cup  is  a  landscape  with  a  large  tree  and  two  figures  in  the  foreground 
and  a  square  building  in  the  distance;  the  other  side  is  printed  with  the  same  subject 
as  the  saucer  of  No.  671.  On  the  saucer  is  an  Italian  river-scene  with  a  fortilied  tower 
on  either  side  of  the  stream  and  three  figures  in  the  foreground.  Cup,  H.  i|  in.,  diam. 
2|  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  4I  in. 

125.  Iwo  Coffee-cups  and  Saucers,  decorated  with  prints  in   lilac  painted   over    in 

colours.     About  1765.     (Plate  58.) 

One  of  the  cups  is  printed  on  one  side  with  a  view  of  Italian  mountain  scenery,  on  the 
other  with  a  ruined  colonnade  and  two  figures.  The  prints  on  the  second  cup  depict 
a  landscape  with  a  round  tower  and  other  buildings,  and  two  figures  in  the  foreground  of 
a  view  of  ruins  amongst  which  are  introduced  an  aqueduct  and  the  Temple  of  Vespasian 
at  Rome.  The  saucers  are  printed  respectively  with  a  group  of  ruins  with  a  fortress  in 
the  background,  and  a  river-scene  with  a  water-mill  and  weir,  and  in  the  foreground, 
a  man  fishing.     Cups,  H.  2|  in.,  diam.  2j  in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  4^   in. 

672.  Goblet,  printed  in  black  and  gilt.     About   1770.     (Plate  56.) 

Two  loop  handles  with  gilt  decoration,  high  foot.  Oh  one  side  is  a  view  of  a  statue 
supported  on  a  ruined  colonnade  with,  in  the  foreground,  a  gentleman  in  i8th  century 
costume  drawing,  attended  by  another  who  holds  a  portfolio.  On  the  reverse  side  is  another 
architectural  print,  in  which  the  Ponte  I^otto  at  I?ome  is  introduced  ;  beside  the  bridge 
is  a  ruined   temple  and  in  the  foreground  is  a  man  fishing.     H.  3J-  in.,  W.  4I  in. 

The  bridge  and  the  figure  of  an  angler  in  the  second  print  are  adapted  from  an  engraving 
by  I'rancis  Vivares,  after  a  drawing  by  Busiri,  published  by  J.  Boydell  in  1769  with 
the  title,  "  The  remains  of  the  Senatorial  Bridge  upon  the  Tiber,  now  called  I^onte 
liotto." 

673.  Two  Coffee-cups,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  "  v  "  (?)  in 

red.     About  1760.     (Plate  62.) 

Cylindrical,  expanding  slightly  at  the  top  and  moulded  with  vertical  ribs  which  are  interru])ted 
by  panels  bordered  with  scrolls  in  relief.  The  two  larger  panels,  on  either  side,  are 
painted  en  camdieu  in  crimson  with  landscapes,  the  same  two  landscapes  appearing  on 
both  cups ;  in  a  smaller  panel,  on  the  front,  is  a  floral  spray  in  colours.  Inside  the 
rim  is  a  border  of  scrollwork  and  flowers  in  colours.     Each,  H.  2\  in.,  diam.  2\  in. 

674.  Two  Tea-cups,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  underglaze  blue.     About  1755. 

(Plate  62.) 

The  outside  is  moulded  with  n(iral  sprays  laid  over  a  pattern  of  vertical  ribs,  which  is 
interrupted  by  three  shaped  panels  with  borders  of  rococo  scrollwork.  Chinese  landscapes 
or  groups  of  trees  are  painted  inside  these  panels,  and  round  the  rim  internally  and 
externally  are  borders  of  Chinese  trellis-diaper;  inside  on  the  bottom  is  painted  a  spray 
of  flowers.     Each,  H.  2  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

Hobson,  Worcfstey  Porcelain,  pi.  xvi,  fig.  1. 

675.  Mug,  painted  in  canary-yellow  and  gilt.     Mark,  "  Chamberlain  Worcester"  written 

in  gold  (No.  50).     About    1800. 

Cylindrical,  with  foliated  loop  handle.  Decorated  with  a  broad  and  a  narrow  band  of  yellow- 
edged  with  gilt  cresting,  and  between  these  with  a  formal  wreath  ia  gold.  H.  j]  in. 
diam.  4^  in. 


VI.— LONGTOX   HALL. 


THE  earliest  manufacture  of  porcelain  in  Staffordshire  was  that 
carried  on  for  a  few  years  by  William  Littler,  at  Longton  Hall, 
near  Stoke-upon-Trent.  Littler  appears  previously  to  have  pro- 
duced salt-glazed  stoneware  at  Brownhills,  near  Burslem,  and  a  certain 
class  of  pieces,  such  as  No.  1,004  *^  ^he  Schreiber  Collection,  with  a 
ground  of  brilliant  blue  enamel,  are  ascribed  to  him.  It  is  known 
from  advertisements  that  he  was  making  porcelain  at  Longton  in  1752, 
1757  and  1758,  and  from  the  account  book  of  William  Duesbury  that 
in  1752  he  sent  goods,  probably  porcelain,  to  be  enamelled  by  Dues- 
bury  in  London. 1  It  is  generally  believed  that  Duesbury,  afterwards 
manager  of  the  Derby  factory,  was  for  a  short  time  connected  with  the 
Longton  works  and  that  he  purchased  the  plant  when  the  factory  was 
closed,  probably  about  1759. 

Two  tea-caddies  in  the  Hanley  Museum,  authenticated  as  having 
been  made  by  Littler,  are  probably  early  productions  of  the  factory. 
The  later  output  may  be  identified  from  the  descriptions  in  the 
advertisements,  and  with  the  help  of  pieces,  such  as  No.  683  in  the 
Collection,  bearing  a  mark  consisting  of  two  crossed  L's  with  a  string 
of  dots  below  in  underglaze  blue,  which  is  reasonably  interpreted  as 
signifying   "  Littler,  Longton." 

The  paste  is  of  translucent,  glassy  character.  A  distinctive  rich 
streaky  blue  is  sometimes  used  as  a  ground  colour  in  the  decoration,- 
whilst  a  decided  predilection  is  observable  for  moulded  ornament  of 
overlapping  leaves  after  nature,'''  in  which  the  midribs  and  venis  of  the 
leaves  are  more  pronounced  than  in  foliated  pieces  made  elsewhere. 
Lor  ornamental  vases  irregular  and  somewliat  ungainly  forms  were 
adopted.'*  The  attribution  to  Longton  Hall  of  the  figures  described 
below  is  highly  probable,  though  based  on  conjecture  only.  A  distinc- 
tive strong  red  in  the  painting  of  the  features,  an  uneven  yellow,  and 
a  dry  green  are  characteristic,  as  well  as  the  lumpy  appearance  of  tlte 
underside  of  the  base. 


'  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Povcelain,  p.  8. 
-No.  683.  ^Nos.  683,  117,  332.  ■'Nos.  36,  47. 


120  I.ONGTON    HALL. 

§  I.    STATUETTES  AND   GROUPS. 
Nos.  676-682. 

These  pieces  are  all  painted  in  enamel  colours,  amongst  which  a 
dense  brick-red,  a  dry  yellow,  and  a  green  resembling  that  of  a  primrose- 
leaf  are  conspicuous ;  gilding  of  poor  quality  is  also  added  except  in 
the  case  of  Nos.  680,  682  and  i6g. 

676.  Actor,  perhaps  intended  for  David  Garrick  (b.  1717,  d.  1799).     (Plate  69.) 

Standing  figure,  wearing  a  pink  sleeved  cloak  with  yellow  lining  thrown  over  one  shoulder, 
a  white  tunic  with  a  pattern  of  stars,  partially  unbuttoned,  red  breeches  and  shoes  and 
white  stockings.  His  right  hand  rests  on  a  book  lying  open  on  a  panelled  pedestal  on 
the  front  of  which  are  suspended  a  mask,  a  dagger  and  a  wreath ;  the  book  is  inscribed 
with  words  of  which  "  The  cloud  cap  .  .  .  the  gordeous  "  are  alone  legible.  Oblong 
plinth.     H.  7J  in. 

A  similar  figure  appears  in  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.  xxxiii. 

677.  Group.     Two  boys  feeding  a  goat.     (Plate  69.) 

One  of  the  boys  is  sitting  on  a  rock,  with  a  basket  of  grapes  under  his  right  arm  and  his 
left  arm  round  the  horns  of  a  goat  that  stands  beside  him  with  its  mouth  full  of  grapes ; 
his  companion  reclines  beside  the  rock  with  his  right  hand  on  the  edge  of  the  basket. 
Both  boys  are  naked  except  for  loose  drapery,  red  and  yellow  respectively,  thriiwn  about 
their  shoulders.  The  flesh  is  tinted  with  a  reddish-pink  colour.  The  group  is  supported 
on  a  rococo-scrolled  pedestal  with  applied  flowers  on  which  traces  of  gilding  remain. 
H.  si  in-.   W.  6  in. 

Two  groups  from  the  same  model  are  reproduced  in  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain, 
pi.  xl.     A  similar  group  in  Plymouth  porcelain  is  in  the  Collection  (No.  693). 

Journals,  ».,  illustration  facing  p.  360. 

678.  Market-woman  selling  Butter.     (Plate  70.) 

She  is  seated  with  legs  crossed  on  a  rock  with  rococo  scrollwork  and  applied  flowers  on  the 
front  and  wears  a  yellow  hood,  a  pink  cape  over  a  red  bodice,  and  a  white  skirt  with 
a  pattern  of  stars  similar  to  that  on  the  figure  \o.  676.  A  basket  containing  pats  of 
butter  is  suspended  from  the  rock,  whilst  the  woman  holds  a  small  dish  of  butter  in 
her  right  hand  and  another  object,  now  missing,  in  her  left ;  on  her  lap  are  flowers. 
H.  5l  m. 

679.  Man  reclining.     (Plate  69.) 

He  leans  to  the  left  on  a  rock,  supporting  a  shallow  basket  with  his  left  hand ;  his  right  arm 
is  raised.  His  dress  consists  of  a  pink  coat  over  a  white  waistcoat  with  a  pattern  of 
stars,  red  breeches,  white  stockings  and  black  shoes.  The  figure  rests  on  a  rococo-scrolled 
base  with  applied  flowers.     H.  6J  in.,  W.  4J   in. 

A  similar  figure  is  reproduced  in  Berruose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.  xxxiv. 

680.  Boy,  emblematic  of  Autumn.     (Plate  70.) 

He  sits  leaning  towards  the  left  on  a  rococo-scrolled  pedestal.  He  supports  a  basket  of 
grapes  with  his  right  hand  and  holds  out  a  bunch  of  them  in  his  left  hand.  He  is 
dressed  in  a  plumed  black  hat,  a  purple  cloak,  a  red  and  yellow  doublet,  purple  trunk 
hose,  white  stockings  and  black  shoes.     H.  45  in.,  \V.  3I  in. 

A  similar  figure,  wrongly  described  as  a  girl,  appears  in  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain, 
pi.  xxxiv. 


LONGTON  HALL.  121 

681.  Boy,  perhaps  emblematic  of  Autumn.     (Plate  70.) 

He  sits  on  a  tree-stump,  which  rises  from  a  rococo-scrolled  base,  and  leans  to  the  left  on  a 
small  cask.  He  wears  a  plumed  black  hat,  a  red  coat  over  a  white  waistcoat,  crimson 
breeches  tied  below  the  knee,  loose  white  stockings  and  black  shoes.     H.  5J  in. 

A  similar  figure  appears  in  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.  .\x.\i. 

169.  Old  M.\n,  emblematic  of  Winter.     (Plate  70.) 

.An  old  man  wearing  a  long  white  coat  with  yellow  lined  hood,  blue  fur-trimmed  cap,  blue 
breeches,  and  yellow  stockings,  standing  warming  his  hands  over  a  brazier.  Supported  on  a 
scrolled  base.     H.  4;  in. 

A  similar  figure  is  reproduced  in  Bemrose,  Boiv,  Chelsea  and  Derby  Porcelain,  on  the  title- 
page  of  the  Appendix  on  Longton  Hall. 

189.  Boy    with     Flowers,    copied    from    a    Meissen    figure    modelled    about     1750. 
(Plate  70.) 

A  bare-legged  boy   seated    on    a    vintager's  basket    full  of   flowers,  wearing  a  pink  coat  and 
breeches,  with  yellow  bows  on  the  shoulders  and  flowers  at  the  knees ;  he  holds  bunches 
of  flowers  in  his  hands.     Rococo-scrolled  base.     H.  4J   in. 
Similar   to    the    figure   reproduced    in    Bemrose,    Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.    xxxiii.      For    the 
Meissen  original,  see  Album  of  the  Royal  Saxon  Porcelain  Manufactory,  pi.  3,  No.  15. 

682.  Musician.     (Plate  70.) 

A  young  man  in  a  wide-brimmed  black  hat,  short  purple  cape,  flowered  yellow  tunic, 
crimson  breeches,  white  stockings  and  black  shoes,  sitting  with  a  violin  supported  on 
his  left  hip  on  a  rocky  mound,  which  rises  from  a  rococo-srroUed  base  decorated  with 
applied  flowers.     H.  5J  in. 

A  similar  statuette,  with  its  companion,  a  girl  holding  a  sheet  with  a  song,  is  shown  in 
Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.  x.\.xvi. 


§  2.   VASES  AND   PIECES   FOR  DOMESTIC   USE. 

Nos.  683,   36,  &c. 

With  the  exception  of  No.  683,  the  following  pieces  are  all  painted 
in  enamel  colours  over  the  glaze ;  dull  gilding  also  appears  on  No.  36. 

683.  Two  Soup  plates,  painted  in  bright  underglazc  blue.  Maik  on  each,  crossed  L's 
set  back  to  back  with  two  dots  vertically  arranged  below,  in  blue  (No.  33). 
(Plate  70.) 

The  rim  of  each  is  moulded  in  relief  with  overlapping  leaves  from  casts  after  nature,  and 
has  a  scalloped  edge ;  the  upper  side  is  coloured  with  blue  under  the  glaze.  The  base 
of  the  plates,  on  which  the  mark  is  painted,  is  left  unglazed.     Each  diam.  8J  in. 

One  of  these  plates,  formerly  in  the  collection  of  I.ady  Hopetoun,  st)ld  in  1885,  was  acquired 
by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  on  .March  i6th  of  that  year ;  the  other  was  given  to  her 
by  Sir  Augustus  Wollaston  Franks,  K.C.B.,  P.S..^.  i^ee  Journals,  ii.,  pp.,  469,  471, 
"  I  went  early  to  see  the  things  to  be  sold  ...  at  Christie's.  They  belonged  to 
"  poor  Lady  Hopetoun  ...  1  had  time  to  note  two  Longton  plates — well  marked — 
"  which  I  have  since  written  to  tell  Mr.  Franks  about — I  don't  want  them,  as  he  gave 
"  me  one  like  them  in  the  summer  .  .  .  Mr.  Franks  has  procured  me  one  of  the 
"  Longton  plates  from  the  sale  of  poor  Lady  Hopetoun's  things.  It  makes  .-m  excellent 
"  match  to  the  one  I  have  already  in  the  collection." 

Church,  fig.  53. 


Y2'2  LONGTON   HALL. 

36.  \'asI'   and  Cover,  with  applu.'d   decoration   in  high  relief.     (Plate  71.)  ■ 

Tlie  vase  has  a  rococo-shaped  body  witli  two  handles  in  the  form  of  volutes,  a  wide  concave 
neck  with  shallow  vertical  fluting,  and  a  high  foot  spirally  fluted  above  a  wide  spreading 
base.  The  chief  features  of  the  body  are  picked  out  in  crimson.  On  either  side  is  a 
shaped  panel,  edged  with  gilt  scrolls,  painted  in  colours  with  an  exotic  bird  among 
bushes.  The  foot  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers,  and  on  the  handles,  shoulders, 
and  sides  are  applied  garlands  of  coloured  flowers  in  high  relief.  The  domed  cover 
is  pierced  with  small  perforations  and  thickly  encrusted  with  large  applied  flowers, 
modelled  and  coloured  after  nature;  amongst  them  are  small  figures  of  a  cock  and  two 
hens,  and  a  girl  wearing  a  yellow  hat,  greenish-blue  bodice,  purple  skirt,  and  yellow 
apron,  clasping  with  her  arms  a  tall  flowering  stem  which  forms  the  apex  of  the  cover. 
H.  16  in.,  W.  8.5  in. 
The  form  of  this  vase  is  similar  to  that  of  a  smaller  vase,  bearing  the  Longton  Hall  mark, 

figured  by  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall   Porcelain,  pi.  xlvi.,  No.  4. 
Church,  fig.  52  ;  Chaffers,  figs.  475  and  496  ;  Mrs.  Hodgson,  pi.  31). 

47.  P-\iR  OF  Vases  of  Flowers.     (Plate  70.) 

The  vases  are  of  rococo-scrolled  form  resting  un  a  high  foot,  and  have  each  panels  on  either 
side    painted    respectively    with    a    bouquet   of   flowers   and   a    figure   of   a   woman.     A 
modelled  bouquet  of  flowers  is  inserted  in  the  top.     H.  4^  in. 
Mew,  pi.  X. 

117.  Tea-pot  and  Cover.     (Plate  68.) 

Inverted  pear-shaped  body  painted  on  either  side  with  an  Italian  landscape  in  greyish-brown 
washed  over  with  purple,  yellow,  and  green.  The  painting  on  one  side  depicts  a  town 
beside  a  river,  on  which  are  three  boats  with  mountains  in  the  distance,  and  in  the 
foreground  to  the  left  a  group  of  trees.  On  the  reverse  side  is  a  river  crossed  by  a  high- 
arched  bridge,  with  a  fortress  on  a  terrace  on  the  further  bank  ;  in  the  foreground  is  a 
group  of  men,  who  appear  to  have  landed  from  an  empty  boat,  towing  a  second  boat  in 
which  are  four  other  men.  The  loop  handle  is  in  the  form  of  a  twisted  vine-stem 
branched  at  the  upper  end  and  terminating  in  bunches  of  grapes  and  leaves  ;  the  spout 
is  formed  of  tivo  cabbage-leaves  pressed  together  at  the  edges,  which  are  coloured  green, 
the  midribs  and  veins  being  purple.  The  shallow-domed  cover,  which  is  painted  with 
two  small  butterflies,  has  also  a  handle  formed  of  a  vine-stem  with  grapes  and  leaves. 
The  handles  are  coloured  in  green  and  purple.     H.  4I   in.,  diam.  4!   in. 

The  form  of  handle,  which  resembles  that  of  certain  Staffordshire  salt-glazed  stoneware 
teapots  (such  as  N.o.  2174-iqoi  in  the  Museum),  appears  to  be  peculiar  to  Longton  Hall. 
See  Bemrose,  Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.  B.,  facing  p.  42,  and  pi.  xli. 

Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  360. 

332.  Pair  of  Sugar-bowls  with  Covers  and  Stands.     (Plate  70.) 

The  bowls  are  each  in  the  form  of  a  melon,  painted  to  imitate  nature,  in  green,  yellow  and 
purple;  on  each  cover  is  a  looped  stalk  with  melon-leaves  forming  a  handle.  The  stands, 
similarly  painted,  are  composed  of  overlapping  lettuce-leaves.  liowls,  H.  45  in.,  5J  in., 
L.  61  in.,  6|  in.;  stands,  L.  gf  in.,  9I  in.,  W.  7  in.,  7  in,  respectively. 
These  pieces  appear  to  be  the  "  Bow  melons  "  purchased  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  for  _{^20 
of  Hamburger  at  Utrecht  on  October  6th,  1879;  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  223,  also  illustration 
facing  p.  360.  They  may  be  compared  with  the  sauce-boats  and  dish  figured  in  Bemrose, 
Longton  Hall  Porcelain,  pi.   xli. 


VII.— PLYMOUTH. 

SOME  time  between  the  years  1745  and  1755,  tlie  true  china  clay 
or  kaolin  was  discovered  in  Cornwall  by  William  Cookworthy, 
an  apothecary  of  Plymouth.  It  was  not,  however,  till  March  17th, 
1768,  that  he  took  out  a  patent  for  the  use  of  this  material  with  china 
stone  or  petuntse,  which  by  that  time  he  had  also  found,  in  the 
manufacture  of  true  hard  porcelain  similar  to  that  made  in  China. 
From  1 771  to  1773,  under  the  style  of  Cookworthy  &  Co.,  he  carried 
on  the  manufacture  at  No.  15,  Castle  Green,  Bristol,  and  it  seems 
that  in  1770  he  removed  his  establishment  to  that  city  from  Plymouth. 
There  is,  however,  some  uncertainty  as  to  the  continuance  of  the 
manufacture  at  Plymouth  for  some  time  after  that  date,  and  as  to  the 
relations  of  the  Plymouth  and  Bristol  works. 

The  most  characteristic  Plymouth  porcelain  is  plain  white,  with  a 
thick  glaze  often  much  discoloured  by  smoke-staining  so  as  to  present  a 
dull  grey  appearance.'  The  statuettes  are  often  considerably  mis-shapen, 
the  result  of  difiiculties  in  firing.  Much  of  the  ware  for  domestic  use  was 
painted  in  blue  under  the  glaze,  generally  of  a  dirty  blackish  tone.' 
Where  enamel  colours  and  gilding  are  used  they  often  appear  to  be 
imperfectly  fused  on  the  glaze.  The  motives  of  decoration  are  mainly 
derived  from  Chinese  porcelain.  The  employment  of  a  French  painter 
is  discussed  below^  under  No.  726.  Spiral  "  wreathing  "  of  the  surface, 
due  to  defective  "  throwing,"  is  characteristic  alike  of  Plymouth  and 
Bristol  pieces  fashioned  on  the  wheel. 

The  mark  used  at  Plymouth  is  the  alchemist's  sign  for  tin  (Jupiter), 
which  resembles  the  Arabic  numerals  2  and  4  conjoined.  It  occurs  in 
underglaze  blue,^  and  over  the  glaze  in  reddish-brown  *  or  blue  enamel 
and  gold.  It  is  certain,  however,  that  this  mark  was  used  by  Cook- 
worthy after  the  transference  of  the  works  to  Bristol,  and  it  is  probable 
that  many  pieces  on  which  the  mark  is  painted  over  the  glaze  in  blue 
or  gold^  were  made  at  that  place.  An  impressed  "  K  ""  is  also  found 
on  a  statuette  in  the  Collection.'' 

Several  pieces  described  below  were  in  the  possession  of  William 
Cookworthy's  relatives  until  they  were  acquired  from  the  Prideaux 
Collection  in  1868  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber.'' 

1  Nos.  68g,  696,  &c.  -  Nos.  712,  723,  724,  757.  ^  Nos.  715,  723,  724. 

*  Nos.  707,  713,  714,  718,  721.         "  Such  as  Nos.  711,  716,  720,  726,  727 

"  No.  27.  '  See  p.  viii. 


124  PLYMOUTH. 

§  I.  STATUETTES  AND   GROUPS. 
Nos.  684-696. 

The  majority  of  these  are  decorated  in  enamel  colours  and  gold  ; 
in  a  few  specified  cases  the  porcelain  has  been  left  white. 

684.  Figure  of   an   Indian  Woman,    emblematic   of    America,   one   of    a   set   of    the 

Four  Continents ;  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     (Plate  72.) 

She  stands,  with  a  head-dress  of  feathers  and  flowered  pink  drapery  thrown  round  her  over 
a  feather  girdle,  taking  an  arrow  with  her  right  hand  from  a  quiver  on  her  back  ;  hei 
left  hand  is  raised  to  hold  a  bow.  .At  her  left  side  is  a  tree-stump  with  skins  hung 
upon  it,  at  the  base  of  which  is  a  prairie-dog.     Rococo -scrolled  base.     H.   I2j  in. 

This  figure  is  evidently  inspired  by  the  antique  Greek  statue  of  Artemis,  known  as  the 
"  Diane  Cluisseresse,"  in  the  I.ouvre,  Paris.  It  may  be  compared  with  a  13erby  biscuit 
porcelain  figure  of  Diana  in  the  Museum  (No.  3012-1901).  A  similar  model  was  used 
at  Bow ;  compare  No.  S  in  the  Collection.  No.  68j  belongs  to  the  same  set  of 
moulds  ;  there  is  a  plain  white  Plymouth  figure  of  Europe  in  the  Museum  (No.  3088- 
igoi)  also  from  this  set.  It  appears  that  this  .set  of  moulds  was  afterwards  used  at 
Bristol  ;  see  Owen,  p.  248. 

Bought  in  London,  October  20th,  1869,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  57,  "We  were  close  to  Carter's, 
the  Minories,  and  went  in  there  .  .  .  Carter  had  a  fine  Plymouth  figure  of  America, 
which  he  called  Chelsea,   and   which   we  bought   for   £b." 

Church,  fig.  41. 

685.  Figure  of  a  Woman,  emblematic  of  Asia,  one  of  a  set  of  the  Four  Continents  ; 

painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     (Plate  72.) 

Standing  figure  supporting  a  covered  vase  of  spices  with  both  hands  on  a  pedestal  of  rock. 
Her  dress  consists  of  a  jewelled  diadem  on  her  head  and  a  green  scarf  thrown  loosely 
over  a  white  robe  diapered  with  purple  flowers.  A  turban  lies  at  her  feet  on  the 
rococo-scrolled  base  and  a  camel  crouches  behind  her.     H.   12!   in. 

From  the  same  set  of  moulds  as  No.  684 ;  see  note  thereon. 

Church,  fig.  40  ;  Burton,  Etiglish  Porcelain,  fig.  53. 

686.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Boys,  painted  in  colours. 

One,  dressed  in  a  black  hat  and  shoes,  white  coat  with  blue  collar,  and  red  breeches,  sits 
astride  of  a  cask  with  a  glass  raised  in  his  left  hand  and  a  wine-bottle  at  his  feet.  The 
otfier,  in  a  brown  hat  and  shoes,  green  coat  with  purple  ct)llar,  and  red  breeches,  is 
seated  on  a  stump,  playing  a  pipe  and  tabor.  Both  figures  are  supported  on  a  high  base 
with  symmetrical  leafy  scrollwork  in  relief  on  the  front.     H.  5^  in.,  5I  in.  respectively. 

687.  Pair  of  Candlesticks,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  with  Irgures  of  a  woman  with 

flowers    and    a    gardener    with    fruit,    emblematic    of    Spring    and    Autumn. 
(Plate  73.) 

Both  figures  stand  in  front  of  a  flowering  tree  on  a  high  pedestal,  covered  with  applied 
flowers  and  resting  on  symmetrical  rococo-scrolled  feet  ;  the  trunks  of  the  trees  form 
supports  for  candle-nozzles,  now  missing.  The  woman  holds  up  a  stem  of  flowers  with 
lier  right  hand  and  with  her  left  supports  a  plant  in  a  basket  on  her  hips.  She  is 
dressed  in  a  red  hat  and  shoes,  a  green  bodice  with  a  gold  floral  pattern  on  the  front, 
a  mauve  scarf  thrown  round  her  shoulders,  and  a  white  apron  over  a  skirt  decorated  with 
coloured  flowers.  Sprays  of  flowers  are  also  painted  in  white  slip  on  her  apron.  The 
gardener  carries  a  basket  of  fruit  under  his  right  arm  ;  his  left  hand  is  raised  as  if  to 
attract  attention.  He  wears  a  black  hat  and  shoes,  a  yellow  coat  and  pink  breeches, 
both  diapered  with  flowers  in  gold  or  colours,  and  a  blue  apron.  H.  9I  in.,  io|  in. 
respectively. 

From  the  same  models,  with  modifications,  as  No.  689. 


PLYMOUTH.  125 

688.  Set  of  Figures,  emblematic  of  the  Four  Seasons,  painted  in  colours.     (Plate  75.) 

Four  boys,  slightly  draped,  each  standing  beside  a  tree-stump  on  a  high  base  with  rococo 
scrollwork  in  relief  on  the  front.  Spring  has  a  garland  of  flowers  on  his  head  and  a 
purple  scarf  over  his  right  shoulder  ;  he  holds  a  nest  with  a  pair  of  birds  in  it,  and  at 
his  side  is  a  beehive.  Summer  wears  a  wreath  of  corn  and  slight  blue  and  pink  drapery  ; 
he  carries  a  sheaf  of  corn  under  his  left  arm,  another  sheaf  lying  at  his  feet.  Autumn, 
with  a  wreath  of  grapes  on  his  head  and  a  flowered  blue  scarf  twined  about  his  body, 
is  in  the  act  of  squeezing  grapes  into  a  goblet  which  he  holds  in  his  right  hand  ;  at 
his  feet  is  a  basket  full  of  fruit.  Winter  is  wrapping  himself  in  a  fur-lined  red  cloak 
and  has  a  brazier  at  his  feet.     H.,  Spring,  52  in.,  the  remainder,  each  5I  in. 

27.  Boy,  emblematic  of  Winter,  painted  in    colours    and  gilt.     Mark,  "K"   impressed 
(No.  51). 

He  is  wrapping  himself  in    a  fur-lined    brown  cloak  and    leans    against  a  holly-bush  with  a 
brazier  at  his  feet,  on  a  rococo-scrolled  base  with  applied  flowers  and  foliage.     H.  ^^  in. 
This  figure  is  a  slight  variation  of  the  "  Winter  "  in  the  last  set. 

689.  P.\iR  OF    CANDLESTICKS,  plain    white,  with  figures  of    a  gardener  and  a    woman 

with  flowers.     (Plate  74.) 

The  figures  are  from  the  same  models  as  No.  687,  with  the  following  modifications  in  detail. 
The  woman  carries  a  basket  containing  flowers  hung  by  the  arch  handle  on  her  left  arm  ; 
small  impressed  and  incised  patterns  are  added  above  the  fringe  of  her  skirt  and  along 
the  seams  of  her  bodice.  The  gardener  carries  a  plant  in  a  flower-pot  instead  of  a 
basket  of  fruit  under  his  right  arm.  The  candle-nozzles  are  missing  from  the  top  of 
the  tree-trunk  in  both  cases.  The  glaze  of  both  pieces  is  much  discoloured.  H.  gl  in., 
9j  in.  respectively. 

Dillon,  1904,  pi.  xlviii. 

690.  Pair  of  Figures,  painted  in   colours    and    gilt.     A    boy  and  a    girl  with  vases 

of  flowers.     (Plate  75.) 

Both  figures  are  naked,  except  for  a  wreath  of  flowers  on  the  head  and  loose  purple  drapery 
at  the  waist.  Both  are  seated  on  a  rock  resting  on  a  high  base  with  symmetrical 
rococo  scrollwork,  picked  out  in  gold  and  green,  and  applied  flowers.  They  each  support 
a  v;ise  with  a  flowering  plant  in  it,  the  boy  with  his  left  hand,  the  girl  with  her  right. 
H.  7j  in.,  7I  in.  respectively. 

Exhibited  in  the  Loan  Collection  at  the  Salisbury  and  South  Wilts  Museum,  Salisbury,  in 
1872;  see  Read,  Porcelain  Statuettes,  p.   u. 

691.  Pair  of  Figures,  plain  white.     A  male  and  female  musician.     (Plate  74.) 

Both  are  seated  between  two  branches  of  a  flowering  tree  on  a  high  pedestal  with  symme- 
trical rococo  scrollwork  in  relief  on  the  front.  The  man,  playing  a  flute  is  dressed  in  a 
plumed  loose  cap,  a  short  coat,  and  a  large  apron  over  knee-breeches.  The  woman 
is  playing  a  mandoline  and  wears  a  hat  set  on  one  side  of  her  head  and  a  mantle 
over  her  dress.     H.  6j  in.,  55  in.  respectively. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection ;  see  p.  viii. 

692.  Musician,  painted  in  colours. 

From  the  same  model  as  the  male  figure  belonging  to  the  last  pair  (\o.  691).  The  cap  is 
white,  with  red  edge  and  purple  plume,  the  coat  light  bluish-green,  the  apron  purple, 
the  breeches  striped  in  red  and  black,  the  shoes  black  with  red  bows.  The  pedestal  is 
picked  out  in  green  and  crimson.     H.  5^  in. 

693.  Group,  painted  in  colours.     Two  boys  feeding  a  goat.     (Plate  75.) 

One  of  the  boys  is  sitting  on  a  rock,  with  a  basket  of  flowers  under  his  right  arm  ;  his 
companion  reclines  beside  the  rock.  Between  them  they  hold  a  long  garland  of  flowers, 
with  which  they  are  feeding  a  goat  standing  to  the  right  of  the  rock.  Both  boys  wear 
a  wreath  of  flowers  on  their  heads,  and  have  loose  drapery,  coloured  red,  blue  and' purple, 
thrown  about  theni.  The  group  is  supported  on  a  pedestal  with  synnnetrical  rococo- 
scrolled  feet,  picked  out  in  dull  crimson.     H.  7^  in.,  W.  jj  in. 

Similar  to  a  Longton  Hall  group  (No.  677)  in  the  Collection. 


126  RLYMOUTH. 

694.  TAiii  111-   Figures,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     "The  Topers." 

A  boy  and  a  young  woman,  seated,  the  former  astride  of  a  cask,  the  latter  in  a  reclining 
a'ttitude  upon  a  tree-trunk.  Hofli  figures  are  supported  on  a  high  base  with  symme- 
trical leafy  scrollwork  in  relief  on  the  front ;  on  either  side  of  each  is  a  branch  with 
applied  flowers  and  foliage.  The  boy,  who  holds  up  a  tankard  in  his  left  hand,  wears 
a  black  hat  and  shoes,  a  liglit  blue  jacket,  and  red  breeches.  The  woman  leans  on  a 
cask  and  raises  a  wine-glass  to  her  lips  with  her  right  hand  ;  she  is  dressed  in  a  purple 
bodice,  a  flowered  skirt  and  red  shoes,  and  has  a  red  plume  in  her  hair.  H.  6J  in., 
6  in.  respectively. 

Church,  fig.  39. 

695.  Two  Figures,   plain    white,   emblematic    of    Spring    and    Winter,  from   a  set  of 

the  Four  Seasons. 

The  figures,  two  boys  slightly  draped,  are  similar  to  those  in  the  coloured  set.  .No.  688. 
Winter  is  almost  identical  with  that  in  the  set,  and  with  .\'o.  27,  whilst  Spring  varies 
from  the  coloured  example  in  the  pose  of  the  arms,  No  beehive  is  placed  at  his  side,  and 
instead  of  a  nest  he  holds  up  a  bunch  of  flowers  in  his  right  hand,  resting  his  left  hand 
on  a  branch  of  the  flowering  tree  at  his  back.     Each,  H.  5I  in. 

Formerly  in   the  Prideaux  Collection. 

696.  Frederick  THE  Gre.\t,    King  of    Prussia    (1740-1786);    plain    white    porcelain. 

(PL.A.TE  74.) 

The  king  is  represented  standing  on  a  rocky  oval  base,  before  a  short  tree-stump  with  ivy 
climbing  up  it.  He  is  dressed  in  military  uniform,  consisting  of  a  cocked  hat,  frock 
coat,  with  the  skirts  buttoned  back,  confined  by  a  sash  at  the  waist,  breeches,  high  top- 
boots,  and  gloves  ;  he  wears  a  long  queue,  and  on  his  breast  the  star  of  an  order.  The 
glaze  is  much  discoloured,  so  as  to  appear  of  a  greenish-brown  tone  in  places  where 
it  is  thickly  collected.  M.  7J  in. 
This  figure  is  very  similar  to,  and  probably  inspired  by,  a  painting  by  Johann  Heinrich 
Christian  Franke,  now  in  the  Hohenzollern  Museum,  Berlin,  from  which  many  engravings 
were  made  ;  see   Friedrich  der  Grosse  in  der  Ktinst,  pi.   18,  p.   18. 


§  2.   FIGURES   OF  ANIMALS   AND   BIRDS. 

Nos.   697-705. 

With  the  exception  of  Nos.  69S,  699  and  703,  these  pieces  are  painted 
after  nature,  with  varying  degrees  of  fidelity,  in  enamel  colours,  generally 
of  subdued  tone. 

697.  Lion,  painted  in  colours.     (Pl.\te  74.) 

The  lion  is  in  a  couchant  attitude,  on  an  oval  plinth,  which  is  decorated  with  scrolls  in 
crimson  ;  the  hair  of  the  lion  is  indicated  by  painting  in  reddish-brown,  and  details  of  the 
mouth  and  claws  in  red  and  black.     H.  3  in.,  L.  jj  in. 

698.  Cow,  plain  white.     (Plate  74.) 

The  animal  is  represented  lying  down  amongst  flowers  on  a  shaped  base.  H.  3!  in., 
L.  5I  in. 

699.  Go.xT,  plain  white. 

A  male  goat,  standing  on  a  rocky  base,  shaped  in  front  with  rococo  scrollwork.  The  glaze 
shows  slight  discoloration.     H.  3^  in.,  L.  3^  in. 


PLYMOUTH.  127. 


700.  Sheep,  painted  in  colours. 

Lying  down  on  a  shaped  base,  coloured  green  on  tlie  top  and  moulded  in  front  with  rococo 
scrollwork  picked  out  in  crimson.  The  fleece,  face  and  hoofs  of  the  animal  are  slightly 
coloured  in  reddish-brown  and  black.     H.  2}  in.,  L.  3I  in. 

[701.  Spaniel,  Bow  porcelain,  see  p.   15.] 

702.  H.\RE,  painted  in  colours. 

The  hare  is  sitting  up  on  its  haunches  with  ears  erect,  on  an  oval  base  on  which  are  applied 
flowers  and  leaves  painted  in  various  colours.  The  fur  is  rendered  by  fine  strokes  in  reddish- 
brown,  details  of  the  head  and  claws  in  dark  brown.     H.  6}  in.,  L.  5  in. 

703.  Phe.\s.\nt,  plain  white.     (Plate  74.J 

The  bird  is  perched  on  a  tree-trunk  partially  covered  with  the  llowers  of  a  climbing  plant. 

H.  8  in. 
Exhibited  in  the  Loan  Collection  at  the  Salisbury  and  South  Wilts  Museum,  Salisbury,  in  1872. 

See  Read,  Porcelain  Slatnettes,  p.   11. 
Journah,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  434. 

704.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Pheasants,  painted  in  colours. 

Each  is  perched  on  a  tree-stump,  with  applied  flowers  and  leaves.  The  crest  of  the  birds  is  red 
and  yellow,  the  back  of  the  neck  brown  and  blue,  the  breast  and  tail  red,  the  back 
yellow,  the  wings  blue,  brown  and  back.  One  of  the  pair  is  from  the  same  model  as 
No.  703.     Each,  H.  8  in. 

Chaffers,  fig.  457. 

J 

705.  Pair  of  Figures  of  Finches,  painted  in  colours. 

Both  birds  are  from  the  same  model.  They  are  represented  with  head  turned  back,  and  the 
left  wing  slightly  raised,  perched  on  a  flowering  tree-stump  which  rises  from  a  shaped 
stand,  with  rococo  scrollwork  on  the  front.  Both  birds  are  black  on  the  crown  of  the 
head.  One  has  a  bright  red  breast,  yellow,  red  and  purple  wings,  and  purple  and  blue 
tail  ;  the  breast  of  the  other  is  flecked  with  red  and  yellow,  the  wings  are  dull  crimson,, 
red  and  black,  and  the  tail  crimscm.  The  scrollwork  on  the  stand  of  the  first  is 
coloured  in  purple  and  green,  on  that  of  the  second  in  dull  crimson.  H.  4J  in.,  4^  in. 
respectively. 


§3.   VASES  AND  DECORATIVE  PIECES. 

Nos.  706-709. 

These  pieces  are  all   painted  in  enamel  colours,   with  the  addition, 
except  in  tlie  case  of  Nos.  709  and  709^,  of  slight  gilding. 

706.  Set    of    three   Vases    with    Covers  and  two  Beakeics.      Mark,   the   sign    for 
tin,  in  gold.     (Plate  76.) 

These  pieces  take  the  most  usual  form  of  a  Chinese  ,i,'(inii'/iifc  dc  ilicmincc.  The  vases  have 
elongated,  inverted,  pear-shaped  bodies,  expanding  at  the  base,  and  contracted  at  the  neck, 
varying  considerably  in   the  proportions  of  their  members ;  the  covers  are  of  domed  form 


128  PLYMOUTH.- 

witli  a  wide  flat  rim  and  pointed  knob.  Tlie  beakers  are  slender  in  shape,  expanding  at 
the  base  and  flaring  more  widely  at  the  mouth.  On  each  piece  are  scattered  bouquets  and 
sprays  of  flowers,  amongst  which  is  seen  a  bunch  of  currants,  all  painted  m  natural 
coloijrs  ;  a  butterfly  and  a  ladybird  appear  in  the  intervals  on  each  piece.  Round  the 
neck  of' the  vases  and  beneath  the  mouth  of  the  beakers,  below  a  narrow  band  ()f  gilt 
scrolls    is  a  crimson   line  twined  about  with   a  stem  of  green  foliage.     A  similar  Ime  and 

_^ !-• 1-    *1.„    — !,»„    ^f    +V.«    ,-,T,-r.rc     Tirliir-V,     ar*^    a  1  cn  HpfnratpH   with    floml    SOraVS.       VaSCS. 


scrolls,  is  a  crimson  Ime  twmed  about  witn  a  stem  oi  green  loiiage.  ^i  biuiiidi  imc^  aim 
Stem  encircle  the  edge  of  the  cnvrrs,  which  are  also  decorated  with  floral  sprays.  Vases, 
H.  ilj  in.,  ii>  in.,  ii  in.,  diam.  5  in.,  5!  in.,  4^  in.  respectively  ;  beakers,  H.  9  in.,  g^  '"-. 
diam.  4i   in.,'4Vii   in.  respectively. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

Chaffers,  fig.  456;  Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  434;  Mrs.  Hodgson,  [jI.  7. 

707  Set  of  three  V.\ses  with  Covers  and  two  Beakers.  Mark,  on  the  vases  and 
one  of  the  beakers,  the  sign  for  tin,  in  red;  on  the  remaining  beaker,  a  cross 
hicised  through  the  glaze  (No.  53).     (Plate  75.) 

The  forms  of  these  pieces  vary  slightly  from  those  of  the  garniture  described  above..  The  vases 
are  of  elongated  ovoid  shape,  curving  upwards  from  the  shoulder  to  the  narrow  mouth  ; 
the  covers  are  similar  in  form  to  those  of  No.  706.  The  beakers  are  nearly  cylindrical, 
flaring  outwards  at  the  base  and  rim.  The  vases  and  beakers  are  similarly  painted  with 
a  loose  bouquet  and  detached  sprays  of  flowers,  amongst  which  are  a  butterfly  and  a 
ladybird  all  in  natural  colours.  The  covers  of  the  vases  are  also  decorated  with  floral 
sprays  in  colours.  The  shoulder  of  the  vases,  the  upper  part  of  the  beakers,  and  the  edge 
of  the  covers  are  surrounded  by  a  narrow  band  of  formal  ornament  in  gold.  Vases, 
H.  qI  in.,  io|  in.,  ql  in.,  diam.  4fV  in.,  4tV  in.,  4^  in.  respectively;  beakers,  H.  7I  in., 
7>  in.,  diam.  },},  in.,  3t°5  in.  respectively. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

The  difficulty  of  firing  the  porcelain  at  the  Plymouth  factory  and  its  liability  to  distortion  in 
the  kiln  is  indicated  by  the  great  divergence  in  shape  and  size  between  the  pieces  composing 
this  set,  and  by  the  fact  that  one  of  the  covers  was  chipped  before  it  was  painted,  and 
was  yet  considered  worth  decorating,  a  leaf  in  green  enamel  being  painted  over  the  chip. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  pi.  xviii ;  Solon,  pi.  xvi. 

708.  Vase. 

The  form  is  intermediate  between  those  of  the  vases  in  the  sets  706  and  707.  The  greater 
part  of  the  surface  is  occupied  by  a  landscape  with  trees  and  flowering  shrubs,  amongst 
which  are  two  exotic  birds,  the  whole  painted  in  rich  colours.  A  butterfly  and  another 
large  insect  are  painted  on  the  shoulder,  below  a  band  of  scroll  ornament  in  gold.  The 
base  has  also  a  formal  border  in  gold.     H.  8|  in.,  diam.  4VV  m. 

This  vase  is  painted  by  the  same  enameller  as  Nos.  726,  727  and  740:  see  note  on  No.  726. 

Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  illustration,  p.   105. 

709.  rouNcE-BOX  from  an  inkstand. 

In  the  form  of  a  concave  cylinder,  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  between 
two  formal  borders  in  dull  crimson.  The  top  is  pierced  with  small  perforations. 
H.  3fV  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 

.\  similar  piece  in  Bristol  porcelain  is  reproduced  by  Owen,  hg.  jS. 

709a.  Ink-pot.     Mark,  the  sign  for  tin  in  gold,  now  almost  obliterated. 

Similar  in  form  to  No.  709.  The  sides  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours. 
The  top,  which  appears  to  have  been  similarly  decorated,  has  been  broken  away. 
H.  2j  in.,  diam.  2|  in. 


PLYMOUTH.  129 

§  4.   PIECES   FOR   DOMESTIC   USE. 

Nos.  710-727. 

Willi  the  exception  of  Xo.  710,  the  following  pieces  are  all  decorated 
with  painting  either  under  the  glaze  in  blue,  which  is  usually  of  dull 
greyish  tone,  or  over  it  in  enamel  colours,  sometimes  with  the  addition 
of  gilding. 

710.  Pair  of  Salt-cellars,  plain  white.     (Pl.\te  74.) 

K.ich  is  in  the  form  of  a  large  sliell  resting  on  a  heap  of  smaller  shells  and  coral.     H.  j,  in,, 

2|  in.,  W.  5  in.,  4II  in.  respectively. 
Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

743.  Sauce-boat,  painted  in  colours,  with  slight  gilding. 

The  body,  which  has  a  rim  of  irregular  outline,  is  moulded  on  either  side  with  rococo  scrolls, 
picked  out  in  crimson,  surrounding  a  shaped  panel  which  in  both  cases  is  painted  in 
colours  with  a  cock  and  a  peacock  amongst  bushes  ;  gilding  is  added  to  the  tail  of 
the  latter  bird.  Below  the  curved  lip  is  a  bouquet  in  natural  colours.  The  spreading 
foot  is  moulded  with  scrollwork;  the  handle  is  of  scrolled  form,  with  an  acanthus-leaf 
at  the  top.     H.  3^  Jn.,  L.  5I  in. 

Other  pieces  from  the  same  mould  are  a  pair  of  sauce-boats  lent  to  the  Museum  by 
Mr.  Sidney  T.  Whiteford,  which  are  inscribed  in  red  under  the  base  with  the  words 
"  .V-  IV"-  Cooktmrthy's  Factory  Plym'  1770,"  and  another  in  the  Museum  (Xo.  3097-1901) 
painted  on  either  side  with  a  single  cock.  .As  has  been  suggested  in  the  Catalogue  of 
the  Museum  of  Practical  Geology,  2nd  edition,  p.  165,  the  cocks  on  this  piece  and  on 
Xo.  743  may  have  reference  to  the  crest  of  the  Cookworthy  family,  a  cock  gules. 

745.  Salce-boat,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours  in  the  Japanese  style. 

From  the  same  mould  as  Xo.  743  (compare  note  thereon).  Beneath  and  inside  the  lip  and 
in  the  panel  on  either  side  of  the  body  is  a  spray  of  conventional  flowers  in  Japanese 
style,  painted  in  red,  green,  yellow  and  blue.     H.  3?   in.,  L.  5^^  in 

The  style  of  decoration  is  similar  to  that  of  the  tea-pot  Xo.  718. 

[711.  Jug,  Bristol  porcelain,  see  p.  145.] 

712.  Mug,  painted  in  underglaze  blue  in    the    Chinese  style.     Mark,  the  sign  for  tin, 

in  blue.     (Plate  74.) 

Inverted  bell-shaped,   with  loop  handle.      Painted  with  a  landscape  in  which   are  a   pavilion 
among  rocks,  pine-trees  and  bamboos,  and  with  a  formal  border  of  cresting.      H.  3'  in., 
diam.  3J  in. 
Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

757.  Mug,  painted  in  underglaze  blue.      On  the  front    is  the    inscription:   "Josiah  & 
Catharine  Greethead.     March  13  1769."      (Plate  74.) 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  grooved  loop  handle.  The  inscription  is  flanked  by  two  floral 
sprays  in  Chinese  style ;  below  it  arc  also  two  small  stems  of  conventional  flowers. 
The  rim   is  encircled  with  a  narrow  border  of  cresting.     H.  42   in.,  diam.  3',   in. 

713.  Mug,  painted  in  colours    and    gilt,    in    imitation    of    Chinese    porcelain    of    the 

famillc  verle.     Mark,  the  sign  for  tin,  in  red  (i\o.  52). 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.      Nound  the  body  are   four    panels   with  cuspcd  and 
pointed  tops  painted  in  colours  alternately  with   a   fabulous  Chinese  monster,  and   with 
X     1U2.VJ  I 


I30  PLYMOUTH. 

a  group  of  vases  containing  flowers  on  a  low  stand.  The  spandrels  between  the  panels 
are  filled  with  floral  ornament  in  red  and  green  ;  round  the  top  is  a  border  of  cell- 
pattern  interrupted  by  compartments  containing  conventional  flowers.  The  colours 
employed  are  red,  green,  yellow,  crimson  and  blue,  with  black  outlines,  all  over  the 
glaze.     H.  &2  '"■'  diam.  4^  in. 

Tliis  version  of  a  Chinese  pattern  was  probably  derived  from  Worcester  ;  its  use  at  that 
factory  is   exemplified   by  a   cup   and  saucer   in  the  Museum  (No.  4796-1858). 

I'ormerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

.Mrs.  Hodgson,  pi.  7. 

714.  Mug,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  the  sign  for  tin,  in  red. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  713.  Bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  are  distri- 
buted m-p.T  the  surface,  a  bunch  of  currants  being  introduced  amongst  them.  Kound 
the  top  is  a  narrow  formal  border  in  gold.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

715.  Skt  of  seven    Tk.ws    with    three    Spoons,    for    dessert,  painted    in    underglaze 

blue  of   dark  greyish   tone.      Mark  on   one  of   the   trays,   the  sign    for   tin    in 

blue,  indistinct.     The  set  is  accompanied  by  a  polished  wood  circular  stand. 

The  set  should  consist  of  six  segmental  trays,  of  wavy  outline   on   the   outer   circumference, 

litting  together  round  a  central  hexagonal  one.     Two  of  the  six   trays   are  missing  and 

have  been  replaced    by    hexagonal    trays    doubtless   obtained    from    other    defective  sets. 

All  the  trays  have  high  sides  sloping  outwards  from  a  flat  base  and    are  painted    round 

the   top   outside  with   a    narrow    formal    border.      The    sides    of    the  four    remaining 

segmental  trays  are  also  painted  externally  with  sprays  of  flowers.      The  spoons  are   of 

a  Chinese  form,  with  petal-shaped  bowl  and  long  curved  handle ;  the  handle  is  decorated 

on  the  upper  side  near  the  end  with   a    /JcuiiHs-blossom,  in  two   cases    impressed,  in    the 

third  applied  in    relief.      Segmental    trays,  H.   li-  in.,  W.    about  4I  in.;  hexagonal  trays, 

H.  ij-  in.,  W.  about  4  in.  ;  spoons,  L.  about  4  in.;  stand,  H.  ij  in.,  diam.  I2|  in. 

The  similar  set  in  Bristol  porcelain  (No.  751)  shows  the  original  composition  of  this  set. 

[716.  Te.\-pot,  Bristol  porcelain,  see  p.  144.] 

717.  Tea-pot    and    Cover,    painted    in    colours    and    gilt.      Mark,    the    sign    for    tin, 

in  gold.     (Plate  75.) 

Bulbous  body  and  domed  cover  both  vertically  reeded,  ribbed  loop  handle,  curved  spout 
repaired  w'ith  a  silver  tip.  On  either  side  of  the  body  and  on  the  cover  are  bouquets 
of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  Round  the  edge  of  the  cover  and  the  shoulder  is  a  band  of 
interlaced  scrolls  in  gold;  the  spout  is  also  decorated  with  gilt  scroll  ornament.  The 
cover  has  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a  strawberry  with  two  leaves,  coloured  after  nature. 
The  glaze  is  much  discoloured  and  dotted  with  black  specks.     H.  3I  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

I'onnerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

718.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted   in  colours   in  the  Japanese  style.     Mark,  the  sign 

for  tin,  in  red.     (Plate  75.) 

Globular  body,  with  curved  spout  and  ribbed  loop  handle;  slightly  domed  cover  with 
cone-shaped  knob.  On  either  side  of  the  body  and  on  the  cover  is  a  group  of  conven- 
tional flowering  plants,  with  (except  on  the  cover)  a  bird  perched  on  a  spray  and  two 
insects  hovering  above  ;  these  motives  are  painted  in  green,  red,  yellow,  and  blue  enamel. 
The  edge  of  the  cover  and  the  shoulder  are  encircled  by  a  narrow  band  of  red  chain- 
pattern.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.,  4^  in. 

Compare  the  sauce-boat,  No.  745. 

[719.  Tea-pot,  Worcester  porcelain,  .sec  p.   109.] 
[720.  Tea-pot,  Bristol  porcelain,  sec  p.   144.] 


PLYMOUTH.  131 

721.  Tea-pot    and    Covkr,  painted    in    colours    in     imitation    of   Chinese    porcelain. 
Mark,  the  sign  for  tin,  in  red. 

Of  the  same  form  as  N'o.  718.  On  eitlier  side  of  the  body  is  a  Chinese  figure  (in  one  case 
a  man  standing-,  in  the  other  a  seated  lady)  between  a  high  pedestal  and  a  group  of 
jars.  These  accessories  are  repeated  with  a'  flying  bird  on  the  cover,  the  edge  of  which, 
as  well  as  the  shoulder  of  the  pot,  is  decorated  with  cresting  in  red.  The  colours 
employed  are  red,  blue,  green,  yellow  and  crimson  enamel.  The  spout  has  been  broken 
and   repaired  in  silver.     H.  5I  in.,  diam.  4/,,  in. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

[722.   CoFFEE-poT,   Bristol  porcelain,  ,stv  p.   144.] 

723.  B.\siN,  painted  in  dark  greyish  underglaze  blue,  in   the  Chinese  style.     Mark,  the 

sign  for  tin  accompanied  by  a  cross,  in  blue  (No.  55). 

The  basin,  which  is  much  misshapen   and   discoloured,  has  a    flange   round  tlie  rim    for   the 

reception    of   a   cover.      It   is   painted   outside   with   a   group   of   flovj^ering    plants    and 

bamboos.     H.  2|  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 
The  mark  from  this  specimen  is  reproduced  by  Owen  (fig.  87,  pp.  7q,    243),  who  regards  the 

piece   as   an    early    example   of    Bristol    porcelain  :     also    in    Oxford,    Catalni;ue,   Trapnell 

Collection,  p.  xx.     See  also  note  on  N'o.  720,  p.   144,  and  Church,  p.  81. 
Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

724.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  painted    in  dark    greyish  underglaze  blue.     Mark, 

the  sign  for  tin  in  the  same  colour. 

The  cups  are  inverted  bell-shaped  and  have  no  handle  ;  both  cups  and  saucers  have  a  wavy 
edge,  painted  with  a  slight  border  of  conventional  floral  devices.  On  the  outside  of  the 
cups  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucers  are  sprays  of  flowers  of  Chinese  type.  Cups, 
each,  H.  2f,  in.,  diam.   3  in. :  saucers,  each,  diam.  5  in. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

725.  Bowi.,  painted  in  colours  in  imitation  of  Chinese  porcelain. 

The  bowl,  which  is  slightly  misshapen,  has  a  scalloped  rim,  and  is  painted  outside  in  brown, 
red,  crimson  and  green,  with  a  flowering  fruit-tree,  the  stem  and  spreading  branches  of 
which  are  represented  as  passing  beyond,  and  reappearing  from  above,  the  level  of  the 
rim.  Inside  is  a  border  of  two  red  lines  following  tho  scallops  and,  on  the  bottom,  a 
floral  spray  in  crimson.     H.  2-|  in.,  diam.  5J  in. 

The  design  is  taken  from  a  Chine.se  original ;  see  note  on  No.  725a  below. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

725a.  Two  Coffee-cups,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  in  imitation  of  Chinese 
porcelain. 

The  pattern  on  the  outside  is  the  same  and  painted  in  the  same  colours  as  that  of  the 
basin.  No.  273,  with  the  addition  of  gilt  outlines  to  the  trunk  and  branclie.s  of  the  tree, 
and  gilt  bamboos  growing  beside  it.  The  cups  have  each  a  loop  handle.  Each, 
H.  2J  in.,  diam.  2J   in. 

.\  cup  of  Chinese  porcelain  from  which  the  design  is  taken  (No.  725f)  is  described  on  p.  168. 
A  noticeable  difference  between  the  copies  and  the  original  is  seen  in  the  treatment  of 
the  gilt  bamboos  which,  on  the  Plymouth  cups,  resemble  the  mare's-tail  {liqiiisetuin). 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

726.  Two  Coffee-cups,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.      Mark  on  one,  the  sign  fci  tin,  in 

overglaze  blue  enamel. 

On  the  front  of  each,  in  a  shaped  panel  surrounded  by  gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  foliage, 
is  a  pair  of  exotic  birds  brilliantly  coloured  amongst  trees  in  a  landscape.  Four  similar 
birds  flying  are  distributed  over  the  remaining  surface,  below  a  border  of  gilt  scrolls 
and  trelliswork.     Each,  H.  2J  in.,  diam.  sj  in. 

1  2 


132  PLYMOUTH. 


I'orinerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

'Ihe  painting  on  tliese  two  cups  and  on  i\o.  727  has  been  attributfd  to  Henry  Bone,  the 
enamellcr,  who  was  apprenticed  to  Richard  Champion  and  his  wife  at  Bristol  in  1772 
{see  p.  134  below  and  Owen,  p.  294),  and  appears  to  have  served  a  short  previous 
apprenticeship  under  Cookworthy  at  Plymouth.  The  attribution  must  be  abandoned  in 
view  of  the  fact  that,  whereas  the  mark  on  the  cups  shows  them  to  have  been  made 
between  1768  and  1773,  either  at  Plymouth  or  at  Bristol  under  Cookworthy 's  manage- 
ment, Bone  was  born  in  1755,  and  cannot  be  expected  to  have  attained,  before  his 
19th  year,  such  skill  in  enamel-painting  as  is  evinced  by  these  cups  and  similar  pieces. 
The  character  of  Bone's  early  work  may  be  estimated  from  several  Bristol  pieces 
(Nos.  753,  7O8,  770,  776)  bearing  the  mark  ascribed  to  him  ;  the  style  of  painting  upon 
them  is  very  different  from  that  of  these  three  cups.  Other  pieces  painted  by  the 
same  enameller  as  the  latter  are  a  vase  in  the  Collection  (No.  708),  apparently  an  early 
piece  e.\ecuted  at  Plymouth,  the  Bristol  hexagonal  vase  (No.  740),  and  similar  vases  in 
the  British  Museum  (No.  viii.  18),  and  elsewhere  (figured  in  Owen's  book),  and  a  mug 
in  the  V'ictoria  and  Albert  Museum  (No.  3093 — 1901),  probably  made  at  Plymouth, 
formerly  in  the  Museum  of  Practical  Geology,  to  which  it  was  given  by  Earl  Moile\. 
That  this  artist  originally  worked  at  Plymouth  may  be  inferred  from  the  fact  that  a 
l)air  of  Plymouth  sauceboats,  lent  to  the  Museum  by  Mr.  Sidney  T.  Whiteford,  decorated 
with  small  exotic  birds  either  by  him  or  in  imitatiim  of  his  style,  arc  inscribed  on  the 
base  in  red  "  M.''  W'"'  Cookworthy's  Factory  Plym°.  1770."  A  Worcester  plate  in  the 
Museum  (No.  C.  173 — 1910)  of  about  1775,  marked  with  a  fretted  square,  is  also  painted 
by  the  same  enameller,  and  seems  to  show  by  its  more  advanced  style  that  he  passed 
on  to  Worcester  after  working  for  a  few  years  at  Bristol  ;  other  Worcester  pieces  painted 
by  him,  a  butter-dish  with  a  dark  blue  ground,  and  a  plate  assigned  to  the  period 
177J-1780,  are  figured  by  Hobson,  Worcester  Porcelain,  pi.  ii.,  no.  3,  and  pi.  Ix.xxviii., 
no.  I.  His  style  is  a  close  imitation  of  that  of  the  Sevres  bird-painter  Evans  (compare 
Nos.  3428-1853,  276,  277-1876  in  the  MuseumJ,  and  it  is  not  unlikely  that  he  is  no 
other  than  the  French  painter  described  by  Prideaux  (Relics  of  William  Cookworthy)  as 
"  an  excellent  painter  and  enameller  from  Sevres,"  and  elsewhere  variously  named  Saqui, 
Soqui,  or  Lequoi,  who  is  believed  to  have  worked  at  Plymouth  and  Bristol.  The 
question  is  fully  discussed  in  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  p.  104  ;  compare  also  Owen, 
p.  89,  and  Jewitt,  p.  331. 

727.  Coffee-cup,    painted    in    colours.        Mark,    the    sign    for   tin,    in    overglaze    blue 
enamel. 

On  the  front  are  two  exotic  birds  amongst  trees  111  a  landscape,  painted  en  canKiieii,  tlie 
birds  in  blue  enamel,  the  remainder  in  crimson.     H.  2|  in.,  diain.  2f  in. 

I'ormerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

This  cup  is  painted  by  the  same  hand  as  Nos.  708,  726,  and  740,  and  lias  been  incorrectly 
ascribed  to  the  enameller  Henry  Bone  ;  compare  note  on  No.  726. 

Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  70;  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  illustration,  p.   105. 


VIII.— BRISTOL. 


POIiCELAIX  of  some  kind  appears  to  have  been  made  at  Bristol 
intermittently  from  the  middle  of  the  i8th  century  onwards  for 
more  than  thirty  years.  The  earliest  record  is  that  by  Dr.  Pococke, 
written  in  1750,  of  a  manufacturer  "lately  established"  at  "  Lowris 
china  house."  '  Certain  pieces  of  soft  porcelain,  some  of  which,  such  as 
No.  3151-1901  in  the  Museum,  are  marked  with  the  name  "  Bristoll  "  in 
relief,  may  be  identified  as  productions  of  this  factory ;  two  sauce-boats 
in  the  Schreiber  Collection  (No.  87)  belong  to  this  group,  and  correspond 
with  a  description  given  by  Dr.  Pococke. 

.\  second  factory,  in  which  materials  obtained  from  Cornwall  were 
employed,  is  spoken  of  as  "set  up  here  some  time  ago,"  in  a  letter  dated 
from  Bristol  in  January,  1766,"  and  was  abandoned  in  1765.  VV^hether 
this  factory  was  a  continuation  of  that  mentioned  above  or  a  sepa- 
rate undertaking  is  uncertain.  A  plate,  dated  1753,  with  the  initials  of 
John  Brittan,  afterwards  foreman  in  the  works  of  Champion  hereafter 
described,  and  a  bowl,  destroyed  by  fire  in  the  Brussels  Exhibition  of 
1910,  with  the  initials  of  his  brother  Francis,  both  painted  in  blue,  may 
be  associated  with  this  factory,  as  well  as  an  undated  mug  of  similar 
character  in  the  Collection  (No.  no). 

In  1770  a  factory  for  making  hard-paste  porcelain,  or  true  porcelain 
of  the  Chinese  type,  was  set  up  at  Castle  Green,  Bristol,  by  William 
Cookworthy  &  Co.,  in  continuation  of  the  establishment  previouslv 
carried  on  at  Plymouth. ^  In  1773  the  factory  and  entire  patent  rights 
were  purchased  by  Richard  Champion,  who  appears  to  have  been  en- 
gaged in  the  manufacture  of  porcelain  on  his  own  account  as  early  as 
1768,  and  to  have  managed  Cookworthy's  works  from  the  time  of  their 
removal  from  Plymouth.  He  employed  John  Brittan  as  his  foreman. 
In  1775  Champion  secured  an  extension  of  the  term  of  the  patent,  but 
in  1 781  he  was  obliged  on  account  of  financial  embarrassments  to  give 
up  the  works,  and  to  sell  the  patent  to  a  company  of  Staffordshire 
potters,  who  started  works  for  the  manufacture  of  hard-paste  porcelain 
at  New  Hall,  Shelton. 

1  Owen.  p.  15*.  '  Owen,  p.  11.  '  Compare  p.  123. 


134  BRISTOL. 


The  most  characteristic  productions  of  Clianipion's  factory  were  tire 
well-modelled  statuettes,  often  made  in  sets,  which  are  largely  repre- 
sented in  the  Collection.  They  are  mostly  inspired  by,  but  not  directly 
copied  from,  the  models  of  Meissen,  and  resemble  the  contemporary 
Chelsea-Derby  statuettes  in  the  restraint  of  their  colouring.  The  best 
ligures  are  the  work  of  a  modeller  who  had  previously  worked  at  Bow 
and  Worcester  and  impressed  his  productions  with  the  mark  "  T°  "  ;  he  is 
generally  assumed  to  be  the  "  Mr.  Tebo  "  employed  by  Josiah  Wedgwood 
in  1775.'  Champion  also  made  a  few  very  fine  and  richly  enamelled 
vases,  mostly  hexagonal  in  form,  similar  to  No.  740  in  the  Collection. 
In  the  decoration  of  his  "useful"  wares,  the  influence  of  the  pseudo- 
classical  style  of  the  Louis  XVI.  period  is  predominant,  and  a  green 
enamel,  often  appearing  in  festoons  of  laurel,  is  a  characteristic  feature. 
What  is  known  as  "cottage  china,"  ^'  intended  for  sale  in  country 
markets,  with  simple  decoration  from  which  gold  is  absent,  was  also 
made  in  considerable  quantity.  A  speciality  of  Champion's  factory 
were  the  armorial  and  ornamental  plaques  in  biscuit  porcelain  with 
flowers  finely  modelled  and  applied  in  relief. ^  Printing  in  underglaze 
blue,  as  on  "No.  759,  was  never  extensively  practised  at  Bristol. 

The  mark  sometimes  found  on  the  earliest  Bristol  porcelain  is  the 
name  "  Bristol! "  in  relief.  At  Champion's  works  a  cross  in  overglaze 
enamel  blue  or  gold  was  the  most  usual  mark  ;*  on  the  exceptional  pieces 
decorated  in  underglaze  blue^  this  mark  was  also  painted  under  the 
glaze.  A  capital  "  B "  in  blue  over  the  glaze,  and  the  crossed  swords 
of  Saxony  under  it  in  the  same  colour  in  imitation  of  Meissen  porce- 
lain, were  also  sometimes  used.  These  marks  were  generally  accom- 
panied by  a  numeral  in  blue  enamel  or  gold  referring  to  the  painter 
who  decorated  the  piece;  the  numbers  i«  and  2^  are  believed  to  refer 
respectively  to  Henry  Bone,  the  miniature-painter  (b.  1755,  d.  1834),  and 
William  Stephens  (b.  1756,  d.  1836),  who  were  the  first  two  apprentices 
engaged  by  Champion.^  The  Plymouth  mark  of  the  sign  for  tin  was 
used  on  Bristol  porcelain  made  d\iring  Cookworthy's  proprietorship  of 
the  works." 

Certain  pieces  from  the  Prideaux  Collection  described  below  were 
in  the  possession  of  relatives  of  William  Cook  worthy  until  they  were 
acquired  by  Lady   Charlotte  Schreiber.^*^ 

1  See  pp.  5,  83,  also  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  p.   108. 
-  Nos.  742  and  762  may  be  classed  under  this  heading. 
3  No.  739.  *  Nos.  746,  754,  &c. 

^  Nos.  748,  759.  "  Nos.  753,  768,  770,  777-  '  ^!Pc'^^^"      ■•■ 

Compare  note  on  No.  726.         '■>  Compare  note  on  No.  716.  iee  p.  viu. 


BRISTOL.  135 

§  I.  STArUETTES   AND   GROUPS. 
Xos.   728-738. 


le 


The  pieces    are    all    painted  in  enani(>l    colours    and    gilt,    with  t 
exception  of  No.   733A,  which  has  no    gilding.      On  Nos.    732   and   73G 
the  enamel  colouring  is  very  slight. 

728.  Venus  and  Adonis,  with  Cupid.     About  1770.     (Pl.\te  77.) 

Venus  sits  half  reclining  on  a  rocky  bank,  with  a  bouquet  of  flowers  in  her  right  hand  and  her 
left  arm  resting  on  the  shoulder  of  Adonis,  towards  whom  her  head  is  turned  ;  he  sits  by 
lier  side,  offering  her  a  basket  of  fiowers,  which  he  places  with  his  left  hand  on  her  lap. 
.•\  larger  basket  containing  flowers  stands  at  his  feet.  Cupid,  with  his  quiver  slung,  lies 
naked  beside  the  rock,  tugging  with  his  left  fiand  at  a  pink  mantle,  W'hich  is  thrown  over 
the  rock  and  the  left  arm  of  Venus.  The  lower  part  of  the  body  of  the  latter  and  her 
limbs  are  covered  with  yellow-lined  drapery,  decorated  with  sprigs  of  flowers  in  colours 
in  circular  medallions,  surrounded  by  gilt  wreaths  and  reserved  on  a  bluish-green  ground. 
Drapery  with  lining  of  the  same  bluish-green  and  a  pattern  of  gilt  sprays  on  a  dull  crimson 
ground  is  thrown  over  the  knees  of  Adonis.  The  flesh  of  the  figures  is  very  slightly 
tinted,  the  hair  of  Venus  and  Cupid  being  coloured  reddish-brown,  that  of  /Vdimis  greyish- 
brown.  The  group  rests  on  an  oblong  base  rounded  at  the  corners  and  decorated  in  front 
with  symmetrical  gilt  scrollwork.     H.  10}  in.,  L.  iif  in. 

This  group  is  referred  to  in  Journals,  i.,  p.  253  (1874),  as  "  the  fine  double  group  purchased  of 
Jacob  some  years  ago." 

Owen,  fig.  46;  Jewitt,  fig.  748. 

729.  Set    of   i-our    Figures    of   Children,  emblematic   of   the    Seasons.      Mark,    on 

"Spring"  and  ". Autumn,"  "T°"  impressed,  said  to  be  a  mark  of  the  modeller 
Tebo.     About  1775.     (Plates  78,  79.) 

Spring  is  represented  as  a  girl  wearing  a  white  jacket  and  skirt  figured  with  gilt  flowers,  the 
former  open  in  front,  so  as  to  show  a  laced  mauve  bodice ;  she  stands  barefoot,  in  a 
striding  attitude,  supporting  a  basket  of  flowers  on  her  right  hip,  whilst  in  her  left  hand 
she  holds  a  bunch  of  flowers  above  her  head,  which  is  wreathed  with  a  garland.  Summer 
is  a  bare-legged  boy  with  gold-flowered  white  knee-breeches  and  white  shirt  open  at  the 
chest,  the  sleeves  being  rolled  up  to  the  elbow.  He  stands  cross-legged,  with  a  wheat-sheaf 
and  sickle  under  his  right  arm  and  a  few  cars  of  wheat  in  his  left  hand,  leaning  his  left 
elbow  on  a  tree  trunk,  beside  which  stands  a  bee-hive  ;  the  boy's  green-linod  purple  coat  is 
thrown  over  the  latter,  .\utumn  is  a  girl  standing  barefoot  beside  a  low  rock,  with  a 
basket  of  fruit  supported  by  both  hands  on  her  left  hip  ;  she  wears  a  purple  handkerchief 
in  her  hair,  a  white  gold-flowered  dress  with  pink  lining,  confined  by  a  blue  belt,  the  skirt 
being  caught  up  so  as  to  e.xpose  a  gold  and  white  quilted  petticoat.  Winter  is  a  boy 
skating,  with  folded  arms  ;  he  wears  a  black  hat  wreathed  with  holly,  a  fur-trimmed  white 
jacket,  yellow  gloves,  loose  white  knee-breeches  with  gilt  floral  pattern,  white  stockings  and 
black  boots,  and  carries  a  dead  rabbit  and  duck  in  a  rush  basket  slung  by  a  purple  sash 
over  his  left  shoulder.  The  flesh  of  all  the  figures  is  very  slightly  tinted' ;  each  is  sup- 
ported on  an  irregular  base  coloured  to  imitate  the  ground.  H.  11  in.,  loV  in.,  lol  in., 
io|  in.  respectively. 

The  figure  of  Spring  was  formerly  in  the  collection  of  Lord  .Vshburton  at  Uuckenhani,  N'orfolk, 
at  the  sale  of  which  it  was  bought  by  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber,  February  24th,  1S69,  being 
described  in  the  Sale  Catalogue  (Lot  37)  as  of  Chelsea  porcelain  ;  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  61, 
"  Edkins  ....  has  lately  acquired  ...  a  magnificent  set  of  the  seasons,  '  Spring "  being 
of  the  same  model  as  the  little  figure  we  bought  this  year  at  Lord  .'Vshburton's  sale." 

Spring,  Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  61,  Porcelain,  pi.  xlix ;  Summer,  Burton,  F.nglish 
Porcelain,  fig.  62,  Porcelain,  pi.  xlix  ;  Winter,  Church,  fig.  42.  A  similar  set  is  figured  by 
Owen,  pi.  xi. 


'36 


I'.RISTOL. 


730.  Si;t  or  roUR  Figures  in  classical  dress,  emblematic  of  tiie  Seasons,  from  models 
ascribed  to  Tebo.     Modelled  in   1772  or  later.     (I'L.Miis  79,  8o.j 

Spring  is  represented  by  a  woman  wearing  a  small  gilt  tiara  and  a  yellow-lined  diapered  scarf 
thrown  over  a  robe  with  a  pattern  of  flowers  in  colours,  confined  by  a  girdle  on  which  are 
the  zodiacal  signs  .»\ries,  Taurus  and  Gemini.  She  holds  up  a  bunch  of  (lowers  in  her  left 
hand ;  at  her  feet  are  a  plough  and  a  basket  of  flowers.  Summer  is  a  young  man  clad  only 
in  yellow-lined  flowered  drapery  secured  by  a  band  passing  over  his  shoulder  on  which  are 
the  signs  Cancer,  Leo  and  Virgo  ;  he  holds  a  pair  of  shears  in  his  right  hand  with  which  he 
is  about  to  shear  a  ram  lying  with  its  legs  bound  on  a  green  mound,  beside  which  is  a  keg. 
Autumn  is  a  woman  with  a  sickle  and  ears  of  corn  (both  broken  away)  in  her  hands  and  an 
overturned  basket  of  fruit  at  lier  feet ;  she  wears  a  pink-lined  mantle  over  a  loose  robe,  botli 
diapered  with  flowers  in  colours  and  gold,  a  belt  with  the  signs  Libra,  Scorpio  and 
Sagittarius,  and  purple  sandals.  Winter  is  a  bearded  man,  slightly  stooping,  with  a  faggot 
under  his  left  arm,  his  right  hand  leaning  on  a  crutch,  the  staff  of  which  is  missing.  He  is 
wrapped  in  a  yellow-lined  flowered  mantle,  covering  his  head,  over  a  tunic  similarly 
flowered,  loose  white  trousers,  and  black  shoes.  Round  his  waist  is  a  girdle  with  the  signs 
Capricornus,  .\quarius  and  Pisces.  All  four  figures  stand  on  an  irregularly-shaped  base 
coloured  to  imitate  the  ground ;  the  flesh  is  tinted.  H.  9J  in.,  cjj  in.,  lo-  in.,  gl  in. 
respectively. 

In  another  set,  described  in  O.xford,  Catalogue,  Trapnell  Collection,  p.  19,  Xos.  1G6  -Q,  the  figure 
of  Winter  bears  the  impressed  mark  "  T","  ascribed  to  Tebo.  A  similar  mark  is  seen 
on  a  jug  in  the  Schreiber  Collection  (No.  711),  wliicli  has  the  head  of  Winter  applied 
below  the  lip ;  sec  note  thereon.  In  the  autograph  letter  from  Champion  to  the  modeller 
of  these  figures  cited  in  the  note  to  Ko.  731  below,  the  following  passage  gives  instructions 
as  to  the  design  of   this  set  of  the  Seasons:  — 

"  The  Seasons. 

"  Spring,  a  Nymph  with  a  Coronet  of  PTow'rs  on  her  head  in  flowing  Robes  rather  flying 
behind  her,  approaching  with  a  smiling  countenance  as  she  advances  the  flow'rs  appear 
to  start  up  before  her  those  at  her  feet  higher  those  at  a  distance,  which  seems  to  be 
just  Budding  out,  on  the  side  after  a  Plough  or  Harrow,  which  she  points  to  with 
one  Hand,  &  with  the  other  holds  a  small  open  Baskett  fiU'd  with  Seeds  which  she 
offers,  from  the  Baskett  falls  a  kind  of  Zone  or  Belt,  on  which  are  represented,  the  sign 
of  the  Zodiac  Aries  Taurus  Germines. 

"Summer.  A  Man  in  the  Prime  of  Life,  loosely  drap'd  with  a  Belt  round  his  Body,  on 
which  are  represented  the  Signs  of  the  Zodiac  Cancer  Leo  Virgo  .\  P'  of  Shears  (made 
use  of  in  shearing  Sheep)  in  one  hand,  &  with  the  other  supports  a  Baskett  of  wool 
on  his  Shoulders,  on  the  Ground  a  Scythe  with  Trusses  of  Hay  schatter'd  about. 

"  Autumn.  A  Matron  with  a  kind  of  Coronet,  on  her  head  from  whence  Spring  Ears  of 
Corn,  Her  robes  not  so  flow  {sic)  as  Spring  being  of  a  graver  Cast,  in  one  Hand  a 
Sickle,  she  leans  on  a  Thyrsis  round  which  are  twin'd  Baskett  of  grapes,  &  a  Zone 
or  Belt  falling  from  it,  on  which  are  represented  the  three  signs  of  y'  Zodiac,  Libra, 
Scorpio,  Sagittarius,  the  grounds  she  treads  on  full  of  Corn,  &  on  a  side  of  her  a  Baskett 
of  fruit  overturn'd. 

'•  Winter.  A  Descriped  old  Man  his  head  bald  &  a  long  Beard  leaning  a  Staff  under  one 
arm  a  Bundle  of  sticks,  his  robe  schatted(?J  &  clasp'd  with  a  Belt,  on  which  are 
represented  The  three  signs  of  the  Zodiac,  Capricorn,  .■\quarius,  Pisces,  the  ground 
cover'd  with  bare  branches  of  Trees,  Frost  &  Snow  &  Icicles  hanging  down  in 
different  Places." 

Formerly  in  the  collection  of  Mrs.  Haliburton,  of  whom  they  were  bought  by  Lady  Charlotte 
Schreiber,  November  13th,  1869;  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  63,  "Then  we  went  down  to 
Richmond  and  spent  2  pleasant  hours  with  Mrs.  Haliburton  .  .  .  .  We  brought 
away  with  us  her  set  of  Bristol  seasons  each  bearing  some  of  the  Zodiacal  signs,  beauti- 
fully modelled  and  executed     ....     Price  £28." 

Owen,  pi.  x;  Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  Go;  Dillon,  1404,  pi.  xlviii ;  Journals,  i,  illustration 
facing  p.  62. 


I3RISTOL.  137 

731.  SiiT  OF  i-ouR  Figures,  emblematic  of  the  Elements.  Mark  on  each,  "  T" " 
impressed,  said  to  be  a  mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo.  Modelled  in  1772  or 
later.     (Plate  77.) 

Eartli  is  represented  as  a  young  husbandman  in  a  short  dark  brown  ch>ak  thrown  back  from 
his  shoulders  over  a  sleeveless  flowered  tunic  and  purjjle  sandals,  standing;  beside  a 
tree-stump  with  his  left  foot  raised  on  the  blade  of  a  spade,  on  the  handle  of  which  he 
rests  both  his  hands;  at  his  feet  is  an  overturned  basket  of  fruit  and  vegetables,  with 
a  rake  and  a  hoe.  .Air  is  a  winged  youthful  male  figure  in  loose  diapered  drapery  with 
green  and  purple  lining,  flying  amongst  clouds,  with  a  windmill,  the  sails  of  which  arc 
missing,  raised  in  his  right  hand:  the  head  of  a  blowing  cupid,  to  sjmboiise  wind, 
appears  amongst  the  clouds  at  his  feet.  I'ire  is  a  bearded  m.'jn  in  the  guise  of  Vulcan 
with  a  flowered  scarf  thrown  loosely  round  his  naked  body,  in  the  act  of  forging  a 
thunderbolt  on  an  anvil.  Both  arms  are  raised  to  swing  a  hammer  (now  missing) ;  at 
his  feet  is  a  breast-plate  with  lion"s-head  shoulder-piece.  Water  is  a  woman  with  a 
wreath  of  rushes  and  a  flowered  mantle  wrapped  about  her.  She  stands  on  a  shell- 
shaped  base,  holding  up  a  net  full  of  fish  in  her  right  hand,  whilst  her  left  rests  on 
the  rim  of  an  overturned  urn  from  which  water  is  flowing  ;  three  fish  lie  on  the  base 
at  her  feet.  The  flesh  of  all  the  figures  is  very  slightly  tinted,  except  that  of  "  Water," 
which  is  more  fully  coloured.     H.  10  in.,  io|  in.,  loj  in.,  gj  in.  respectively. 

A  reproduction  of  an  autograph  letter  from  Champion  to  the  modeller  of  these  figures,  dated 
"27  feb.  1772,"  giving  instructions  as  to  their  design,  is  published  in  Owen  (facsimile 
No.  4);  the  following  passage  refers  to  the  figures:  "As  1  have  an  Inclination  to 
fancys  of  this  kind,  I  chose  to  write  you  as  wish  to  have  some  elegant  Designs.  I 
have  seen  the  four  Elements  which  are  made  at  Derby  they  are  very  Beautiful!  the 
dress  easy,  the  forms  fine,  two  in  particular,  .Mr  &  Water  and  the  charming  figures. 
I  apprehend  that  you  made  y  models  &  therefore  hope  that  from  your  e.vecution  the 
following  fancies  will  not  look  amiss. 

"  The  Ele.ments. 

■'  Fire.  A  vulcan  forging  a  Thunderbolt  in  the  attitude  of  striking  with  his  anvil  & 
Hammer,  some  pieces  of  Iron  or  coats  or  anything  peculiar  to  a  Blacksmith's  Shop  to 
be  scatter'd  about. 

"Water.  A  Naiad  crown'd  with  rushes,  leaning  with  her  arm  on  an  uni  from  whence  gushes 
out  water.  In  the  other  had  (sic)  she  holds  a  fishing  Net,  with  Fishes  enclos'd  in  it. 
the  ground  ornamented  with  rushes,  shells,  Fish  or  the  Fancies  peculiar  to  water. 

"Earth.  .-Vn  Husbandman  digging  with  a  spade  a  Baskett  fiU'd  with  Implements  of 
Husbandry  en  y  Ground.     The  ground  ornamented,  with  corn,  acorns  or  Fruits. 

"  .\ir.  A  winged  2Cephyr  crown'd  with  Flow'rs  treding  on  clouds,  which  rise  naturally 
about  him,  his  robes  flowing  &  flying  behind  him  he  holds  in  one  Hand  a  Branch  of 
a  Tree,  if  any  ornaments  behind  are  wanting,  some  Cherubim's  heads  blowing  would 
not  be  amiss     .... 

"All  these  figures  to  be  about  10  Inches  high  after  having  seen  the  Derby  Figures,  I  did 
not  recommend  Ease  &  Elegance  in  the  shaped  dress,  but  the  Latter  I  shall  just 
mention  as  the  antique  Robes,  are  very  easy  and  have  a  Propriety  which  is  not  to 
be  met  with  in  foreign  Dresses,  &  as  these  figures  are  of  a  serious  Cast  I  think  such 
dresses  will  carry  with  them  a  greater  Elegance,  I  shall  be  oblig'd  to  you  to  carry  the 
designs  into  execution  as  soon  as  possible." 

Two  of  the  figures  were  bought  at  Metz,  March  29th,  1874,  s« /ou(i;a/s,  '■•  P- -64,  "  M.  Bertol 
came  to  return  our  visit.  We  had  set  out  some  of  our  best  acquisitions  to  show  him, 
and  he  fell  in  love  with  the  two  Chelsea  figures,  boy  and  girl  with  cock  and  hen  .  .  . 
So  we  proposed  an  exchange  with  him  for  his  Bristol  'T°'  figures,  which  he  persists 
in  calling  Tournai,  and  'incderne.'  To  this  he  accfded  after  making  many  pro- 
testations that  we  were  making  '  une  tttauvaise  affaire,'  which  we  (old  him  by  no 
means  to  consider  as  we  were  perfectly  content.  ...  He  promised  to  send  his  servant 
with  the  said  figures  in  the  course  of  the  afternoon  ;  we  concluded  that  he  meant  we 
should   have    them   all    three,    but    when    the    servant   came   he  brought   only   the   two 


138  BRISTOL. 

male  figures  Earth  rmd  Firr.  Tliis  lid  to  a  liule  explanation  .  .  .  M.  Bertol  gave 
us  tlie  oiler  of  breaking  ult  the  bargain,  and  we  proposed  a  still  further  exchange  for 
the  third  figure,  but  he  said  he  wished  to  keep  one  specimen  of  Tournai,  so  there  was 
nothing  more  to  be  said,  and  it  was  a  great  relief  to  us  when  the  servant  came  back 
in  the  last  place,  with  the  beautiful  figure  of  Water,  saying  it  was  indifferent  to 
M.  liertol  which  two  we  kept  out  of  the  lot,  so  that  he  kept  his  one  specimen,  so  it 
ended  in  hire  and  Water  remaining  with  us." 
Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  59. 

732.  K.VRTH,  one  of  a  set  emblematical  of  the  Four  Elements,  from  a  model,  .-iscribed  to 

Tebo,  dating  from  1772  or  later. 

The  figure  is  from  the  same  model  as  that  in  the  set  described  above  (No.  731);  it  is  left 
undecorated,  with  the  exception  that  the  eyes,  eyebrows  and  nostrils  are  picked  out  iu 
black  and  the  lips  in  red,  whilst  the  tunic  has  a  pattern  of  small  gold  spots  and  gold 
lines  round  the  edges.     H.  lOg  in. 

733.  I'.MR  OF  Figures.     A  shepherd  and  shepherdess.     About  1775.     (Plate  77.) 

Both  figures  stand  on  a  high  base,  moulded  with  rococo  scrollwork,  with  applied  flowers  in 
relief  on  the  top.  The  shepherd,  a  youth  wearing  a  black  hat  with  red  ribbon,  a  dull 
pink  coat  over  a  flowered  white  waistcoat,  striped  knee-breeches,  white  stockings,  and  red- 
laced  black  shoes,  is  in  a  striding  attitude,  playing  a  bagpipe ;  at  his  side  is  a  tree-stump. 
The  shepherdess  is  dressed  in  a  blue  hat  with  flowers  below  the  brim,  a  green  bodice 
with  short  sleeves,  red  borders  and  blue  insertion  in  the  front,  white  skirt  decorated  with 
n  iloured  bouquets  of  flowers,  and  pink  shoes  with  red  bows.  She  holds  a  bunch  of  flowers 
in  her  left  hand  and  a  crook  in  her  right.  The  flesh  of  both  figures  is  left  white.  The 
dress  of  the  shepherd  and  the  pedestal  on  which  he  stands  are  enriched  with  gilding. 
The  companion  figure  is  devoid  of  gilding.     H.   iij  in.,   I2j  in.  respectively. 

Chaffers,  figs.  459,  460;  Solon,  pi.  xviii. 

734.  Go.\THERD    holding    a    kid,    from    a    model   ascribed    to    Tebo.       About     1775. 

(Plate  81.) 

Standing  figure  of  a  youth  leaning  against  a  stile  on  a  g:rassy  bank,  and  looking  down  at 
a  kid  held  under  his  right  arm.  He  wears  a  wide-brimmed  black  hat,  into  the  ribbon 
of  which  is  stuck  a  clay  pipe,  a  long  pale  mauve  coat  over  a  flowered  waistcoat,  which 
is  confined  by  a  belt  at  the  waist  and  left  unbuttoned  so  as  to  expose  a  white  shirt 
open  at  the  neck,  yellow  knee-breeches,  white  stockings,  and  brown  gaiters  over  black 
shoes.  A  wicker-covered  flask  rests  against  the  mound  at  his  feet.  The  base,  roughly 
square,  is  coloured  to  imitate  the  ground.  The  flesh  is  slightly  tinted ;  a  crook  is 
missing  from  the  left  hand.     H.   loj  in. 

Another  figure  from  the  same  model,  with  a  companion  figure  of  a  milkmaid,  bearing  the 
mark  "  T°  "  impressed,  is  reproduced  in  Owen,  fig.  54. 

735.  Paii?  of  Figures.     A  shepherd  and  shepherdess.     About  1775.    (Plate  73.) 

The  shepherd,  a  bare-legged  youth  in  a  striding  attitude,  with  a  brightly-coloured  bird  held 
out  in  his  left  hand  and  his  right  resting  on  a  tree-stump,  wears  a  black  hat,  a  yellow- 
lined  pink  coat  over  a  white  shirt,  and  knee-breeches  diapered  with  sprays  of  flowers  in 
colours;  a  dog  sits  at  his  feet.  The  shepherdess,  also  barefoot,  leans  against  a  tree- 
trunk  with  her  head  turned  to  the  right  and  her  left  hand  raised  in  a  gesture  of 
surprise.  She  is  dressed  in  a  blue  and  red  hat,  a  white  bodice,  gold-laced  in  front,  and 
a  w-hite  petticoat  with  a  pattern  of  gold  flowers  under  a  white  skirt,  which  she  catches 
up  with  her  right  hand  to  support  a  lapful  of  flowers.  A  lamb  stands  beside  her.  The 
flesh  of  both  figures  is  warmly  coloured ;  each  stands  on  a  square  base  painted  with 
leafy  scrolls  in  dull  crimson.     H.  6}  in.,  7  in.  respectively. 

Bought  at  Rotterdam,  with  Kos.  736  and  738,  March  13th,  1S74,  see  Joufiiah,  i.,  p.  252, 
"On  reaching  our  Hotel  we  found  we  had  just  missed  de  Maan  ....  He  came,  however, 
the  following  morning  before  I  was  out  of  my  room.  C.  S.  went  down  to  see  him,  and 
presently  ran  joyfully  back  to  me  bringing  what  de  Maan  was  offering  for  sale.  What 
was  my  astonishment  and  delight   when  he  displayed  before  my  bewildered  eyes  no  less 


BRISTOL.  139 

tlian  5  beautiful  Bristol  figures  !  viz.,  the  boy  with  hurdy-gurdy,  a  girl  dancing  with 
triangle,  the  girl  with  dog,  and  a  boy  and  girl  of  a  model  we  had  never  seen  before, 
he  holding  a  bird  and  she  some  flowers.  The  price  was  not  very  small  for  Chelsea, 
which  de  Maan  considered  them  to  be,  but  it  was  little  enough  for  Bristol,  which  they 
really  were,  and  we  gladly  gave  him  the  (,12  to  which,  after  a  little  parleying,  he  came." 

736.  Shepherdess.     About   1770. 

Standing  ligure  in  wide  hat,  gold-laced  bodice  diapered  with  small  gold  (lowers,  and  gold- 
spotted  skirt  open  in  front  to  show  a  petticoat,  also  decorated  in  gold  with  small  sprigs. 
With  her  left  hand  she  holds  up  her  apron  full  of  flowers;  a  bunch  of  them  is  in  her 
right  hand.  At  her  feet  on  the  irregularly-shaped  base  is  a  lamb  lying  down.  The 
figure  is  without  colour,  except  for  the  eyes  and  mouth,  which  are  indicated  in  black  and 
red,  and  slight  red  tinting  on  the  cheeks.     H.  6|  in. 

Bought  at  Rotterdam,  .March  13th,  1874  ;  ice  note  on  No.  735. 

737.  r.viR    OF    Figures.      k  bov    and    girl,  each  with  a    dog.      Mark    on    the    former, 

"T""    impressed,    said    to    be    a    mark    of    the    modeller    Tebo.      .About  1775. 
(Pl.\te  81.) 

Both  figures  stand  beside  a  dog,  which  is  supported  on  a  rocky  pedestal,  rising  from  a  base 
of  irregular  form.  The  boy  is  placing  his  black  hat  on  the  head  of  the  dog  with  his 
right  hand,  turning  his  head  away  in  the  opposite  direction  ;  he  wears  a  white  jacket 
over  a  white  lace-bordered  shirt,  white  knee-breeches  with  a  pattern  of  gilt  flowers,  white 
stockings  and  black  shoes  with  purple  rosettes.  The  girl  has  her  left  arm  round  the  neck 
of  her  dog  and  holds  his  paws  with  her  right  hand.  She  is  dressed  in  a  white  jacket 
and  skirt  ornamented  with  gilt  scrollwork  and  green  cuIFs,  a  pink  ribbon  over  her  left 
shoulder,  and  blue  shoes  with  red  bows ;  her  hair  is  decked  with  red  plumes  and  a  gold 
pendant  hangs  round  her  neck.  The  flesh  of  the  girl  is  tinted,  that  of  the  boy  left 
uncoloured.     H.  71  in.,  7I  in.  respectively. 

738.  P.MR    OF    Figures.      A    boy    and    girl    playing   a   hurdy-gurdy   and  a    triangle 

respectively.     Mark  on  the  former,  "T°"  impressed  (No.  56),  said  to  be  a  mark 
of   the  modeller  Tebo.     About  1735.      (Plate  8i.) 

The  boy  is  in  a  running  attitude,  with  the  hurdy-gurdy,  which  has  a  pattern  of  black  scroll- 
work, strung  by  a  blue  band  from  his  right  shoulder.  He  is  clothed  in  a  blue  plumed 
hat  with  red  ribbon,  white  coat,  waistcoat,  knee-breeches  and  stockings  (the  breeches 
figured  with  floral  spravs  in  gold),  and  brown  shoes  with  red  rosettes.  The  girl  dances 
whilst  she  holds  the  triangle  above  her  left  shoulder  ;  she  wears  red  plumes  in  her  hair, 
a  crimson  sash,  and  light  blue  shoes  with  red  bows,  the  remainder  of  her  dress,  con- 
sisting of  a  kerchief  on  her  shoulders,  a  laced  bodice,  and  skirt  caught  back  over  a 
petticoat,  being  white,  with  details  and,  in  the  petticoat,  flowers  in  gold.  Both  figures 
are  supported  by  a  tree-stump  on  an  irregular  base  coloured  to  imitate  the  ground ;  the 
flesh  of  both  is  slightly  tinted.     H.  7I   in.,  'i\  in.  respectively. 

Bought  at  Rotterdam,  March  13th,  1874;  see  note  on  No.  735. 

Church,  figs.  43,  44;   Burton,  English  Porcelain,  fig.  62,   Porcelain,  pi.  xlix. 

sj   2.    VASES    AND    DECORATIVE    PIECES. 

Nos.  739-741. 

No.  739  is  an  example  of  uiiglazed  biscuit  porcelain.     The  other  two 
pieces  are  glazed,  No.  740  being  decorated  in  enamel  colours  and  gold. 

739.  Plaque,    white    biscuit  porcelain    with  a  bas-relief   of   a  vase  decorated    with    a 

festoon  of  flowers  delicately  modelled  in  full  relief.     About  1775.    (Plate  Si.) 

The  plaque  oval.     The  vase  takes  the  form  of  a  classical  urn   with  domed  cover  surmounted 

by  a   cone-shaped   finial,   rim  moulded  with   acanthus-foliage   above   a   narrow   band  of 


i^o  I'.RISTOL. 

guilloclie  pattern,  and  high  foliated  foot  rising  from  a  square  plinth,  which  rests  on  a 
mass  modelled  to  imitate  a  rock.  The  lower  part  of  the  body  of  the  vase  is  fluted  ; 
the  festoon  of  flowers  passes  through  two  rings  hanging  from  the  rim.  The  plaque  is 
mounted  in  a  glazed  turned-wood  frame  with  gilt  hollow.  Frame,  H.  <)  in.,  W.  8  in. 
Formerly  in  the  Edkins  Collection.  Presented  to  Lady  Charlotte  Schreiber  by  Mr.  William 
Kdkins,  June  loth,  1884,  see  Journals,  ii.,  p.  426,  "1  had  a  visit  from  Mr.  ICdkins,  who 
•  presented  me  with  a  Medallion  of  Bristol  Biscuit,  representing  a  vase,  which  is  to 
accompany  my  collection  to  the  South  Kensington."  An  old  paper  label  attached  to 
the  back  of  the  plaque  is  inscribed  in  ink  "This  is  Hannahs";  it  may  be  conjectured 
that  this  refers  to  the  authoress  Hannah  More,  who  was  a  friend  of  Richard  Champion's 
sister  Sarah  (compare  Owen,  p.  105}.  A  biscuit  plaque  of  this  character  was  modelled 
by  Thomas  Briand  (Owen,  p.  87),  but  there  is  no  evidence  to  show  that  all  such  plaques 
are  from  his  hand. 

740.  V'asf  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770.     (Pl.\te  82.) 

Hexagonal  body,  the  sides  sloping  gradually  outwards  from  the  b.ise  to  the  shoulder  and 
then  curving  in  to  the  short  vertical  neck  :  domed  cover  also  he.vagonal,  w-ith  projecting 
rim  and  knob  in  the  form  of  a  conventional  pine-apple,  coloured  purple,  with  green 
foliage.  The  sides  of  both  body  and  cover  are  separated  from  one  another  by  narrow 
gilt  lines  twined  about  with  gilt  stems  and  tendrils;  similar  lines  and  stems  run  round 
the  base.  The  panels  thus  formed  are  painted  with  brillianlly-plumaged  exotic  birds, 
standing  alone  or  with  others  in  flight  above  them,  amongst  trees  in  wooded  land- 
scapes. .-\  similar  bird  — flying  and  holding,  in  every  case  but  one,  a  branch  in  its  beak 
or  claws— occupies  each  of  the  compartments  on  the  cover.  Round  the  edge  of  the 
cover  and  immediately  below  the  springing  of  the  neck  is  a  border  of  richly  gilt  trellis 
diaper,  edged  with  rococo  scrolls.     H.   15I  in.,  diam.  6|  in. 

Bought  in  London,  December  22nd,  1879,  see  Journals,  ii.,  pp.  252,  253,  "Called  at.  .  .  . 
Samuel's,  where  we  saw  a  magnificent  Bristol  vase  ....  after  some  negotiation,  it 
ended  in  our  buying  the  Bristol  vase  for  /^75.  "  The  vase  is  painted  by  the  same 
enameller   as  Nos.  708,  726,  and   727  ;  for  a  discussion  of  his  work,  see  note  on  No.  726. 

.\  suggestion  tliat  vases  of  this  class  may  have  been  made  at  Plymouth  is  shown  to  be 
improbable  by  Jewitt,  Ceramic  Art,  p.  386. 

Church,  fig.  43  ;  Gibb  and  Rackham,  pi.  28  :  Burlington  Magazine,  xxv.,  illustration,  p.   105. 

741.  Vase,  probably  intended  for  a  pastille-burner,  plain  white.     About  1780. 

The  body  is  in  the  shape  of  a  hemispherical  bowl,  with  top  partially  covered  in  by  a 
concave  fluted  shoulder  and  flange  for  a  cover,  which  is  missing :  round  the  upper  part 
of  the  bowl  is  a  border  of  guilloche  ornament  in  relief,  interrupted  by  three  small  pro- 
jecting lips  of  foliated  form.  The  bowl  is  supported  by  a  central  baluster  and  by  three 
griflins,  sitting  erect  with  outspread  wings  on  a  high  triangular  plinth  with  incurved 
sides,  which  are  decorated  with  rams'  masks  and  festoons  of  foliage  in  relief  between 
two  echinus  mouldings.     H.  7J  in.,  W.  55  in. 

Dillon,  1904,  pi.  xlix.,  1910,  fig.  302  ;  Chaffers,  fig.  466. 

§  3.   PIECES    FOR    DOMESTIC    USE. 
Nos.  Sj,   no,   742-780. 

These  pieces  are  variously  decorated,  as  specified  in  the  description 
of  each ;  the  painting  is  in  overglaze  enamel  colours,  except  in  the 
case  of  pieces  decorated  in  blue  onl}',  in  which  it  is  under  the  glaze. 

87.  Pair    of   S.\uce-boats,    soft-paste    porcelain,  moulded    in    relief   and  gilt.     About 
1750.     (Plate  83.) 

Both  have  an  oval  body,  with  wave-like  projections  on  the  rim  and  long  pointed  lip, 
elaborately-scrolled  loop  handle  with  a  small  mask  in  relief  near  the  upper   attachment 


BRISTOL.  141 

and  spreading  high  foot.  They  are  decorated  outside  with  festoons  of  flowers  in  relief 
cm  the  body,  enclosing  large  lioral  sprays  in  gold,  and  inside  with  a  gilt  spray  on  the 
bottom  and  a  formal  gilt  border;  the  foot  has  flowers  in  relief  and  a  border  of  gilt 
cresting.  H.  5J  in.,  jj  in.,  L.  9I  in.,  8|  in.  respectively. 
Made  at  "  Lowris  China  House."  Dr.  Pococke  states  that  "They  make  very  beautiful  while 
sauce  boats,  adorned  with  reliefs  of  festoons,  which  sell  for  si.vteen  shillings  a  pair  "  : 
see  Owen,  p.  16*.  The  shape  may  be  compared  with  that  of  a  sauce-boat  marked 
"Bristoir''  in  the  British  Museum  (Hobson,  Ciitalogue,  fig.  79). 

110.  Mug,  painted  in  underglaze  blue,  with  equestrian  figures  copied  from  an 
engraving  (pi.  33)  in  The  Ladies'  Amusement  {see  p.  2)  after  a  drawing  by 
R.  Walker.     About  1760.     (Pl.\te  83.) 

Xeailv  cylindrical,  with  loop  handle.  The  riders,  a  lady  and  gentleman,  are  set  in  a  landscape 
with  a  ruined  building.  On  the  handle  are  sprays  of  flowers  and  a  butterfly.  H.  jj  in., 
(iiam.  48  in. 

This  mug,  formerlv  attributed  to  Bow,  is  conjecturally  assigned  to  Bristol.  1  he  paste 
shows  none  of' the  characteristics  of  Bow  porcelain;  though  not  true  hard  paste,  it  is 
harder  than  that  of  Bow  porcelain  and  quite  opaque,  though  granular  in  composition. 
It  differs  bv  its  opacity  from  that  of  the  earliest  Bristol  porcelain,  e.,i;.,  the  sauce-boats, 
Xo.  87.  The  glaze  is  uneven  and  crazed,  and  has  caused  the  painting,  thickly  laid  on 
in  a  brilliant  blue,  to  run.  When  allowance  is  made  for  the  blurred  effect  thus  produced 
the  painting  resembles  the  work  on  Bristol  delft  ware  of  a  painter  named  Bowen,  whose 
signature  with  the  date  J  761  is  cited  by  Owen  (p.  337;  compare  also  fig.  124).  In  other 
respects  the  mug  seems  to  resemble  a  (lorcelain  bowl  made  at  Bristol  for  rrancis 
Brittan  and  dated  1762,  which  is  described  by  Owen  (p.  14)  as  follows:  "Mr.  Kite  of 
Devizes  has  a  fine  hard  porcelain  bowl  bearing  the  initials  of  an  ancestor  of  his,  I'rancis 
Brittan,  and  the  date  |an»  g,  1762.  The  tradition  is,  that  'it  was  made  by  a  near 
relative  who  had  some  connection  with  a  manufactory  of  pottery  at  Bristol.'  The 
name  of  John  Britain  will  be  found  frequently  mentioned  ...  as  Champion's 
foreman,  and  he  was  doubtless  the  '  relative '  indicated.  The  bowl  bears  evidence  of 
being  a  very  early  attempt  at  porcelain  making.  It  is  heavy  in  structure  and  imperfect 
in  glaze.  The  painting— blue  under  the  glaze- though  brighter  in  tint  than  any 
Plymouth  ware,  is  rude  and  inartistic  and  the  colour  is  '  run  '  and  blotty.  IBeneath  a 
Chinese  landscape  inside  the  bowl  is  the  'Blacksmith's  Anns'  .  .  .  Mr.  !■".  Brittan 
was  an  ironmonger."  This  bowl  was  destroyed  in  the  fire  at  the  British  Section  of  the 
Brussels  Exhibition  in  iqio.  Reference  is  also  made  to  it  by  Nightingale  (p.  Ixxxiv), 
who  describes  a  plate  of  similar  character  bearing  the  date  1753,  the  initials  of  John 
Brittan,  and  decoration  "of  Chinese  figures  somewhat  roughly  painted  in  blue,  with 
.some  running  of  the  colour  into  the  glaze." 

Mew,  pi.  xi. 

742.  S.vuci-:-Ro.\T,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     About   1770. 

Oval,  with  loop  handle  and  projecting  lii).  On  either  side  is  a  different  group  of  conventional 
fruit  and  nuts  below  a  band  of  rococo  ornament,  all  in  relief.  Beneath  the  lip  is  a 
bouquet  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  below  scrolls  in  crimson  ;  similar  flowers  are 
scattered  over  the  remaining  surface.     H.  2  in.,  I,.  4!  in. 

[743.  S.vucE-iiOAT,  Plymouth  porcelain,  see  129.) 

744.  P.MR  oi-  S.\ucE-DOATS,    moulded  in  relief    and    painted  in  colours.      .About   1770. 
(Plate  81.) 

Both  have  a  wavy  rim,  curved  projecting  lip,  and  scrolled  loop  handle,  and  are  moulded  on 
either   side   with    a   group  of   flowers   flanked   by   rococo    scrollwork.      The    flowers    arc 
painted  in  natural  colours.     Each.  H.  3  in.,  E.  7!  in, 
Erom    the  same  model    as   sauce-boats  of   Worcester    porcelain    (So.    496)    and   Staffordshire 
salt-glazed  stoneware  (Xos.  891   and  897J  in   the  Collection. 

[745.  Sauce-boat,  Plymouth  porcelain,  sec  p.  129.] 


142  BRISTOL. 

746.  Pair  of  Sauce-boats,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  colours.     Mark,  on  both, 

a  cross  in  overglaze  blue  enamel.     About  1770.     (Plate  81.) 

Both  are  of  oval  form,  with  curved  projecting  lip  and  loop  handle  moulded  with  foliage 
and  bead  ornament.  On  either  side  is  a  festoon  of  flowers  in  relief,  enclosing  a  bouquet 
and  sprays  painted  in  natural  colours;  floral  sprays  are  ;dso  painted  beneath  the  lip  and 
handle.     H.  3j  in.,  3^   in.,  L.  6J  in.,  6J   in.  respectively. 

747.  Salt-cellar,  painted  in  colours.     About  1775. 

In  the  form  of  a  conventional  shell  resting  on    three  small    feet  each    in  the  shape  of  a  ball 

held    by  four  claws.     The    rim    of    the   shell    is    tinted    in    crimson,  and    the    inside    is 

decorated  with  a  bouquet  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  H.  2J   in.,  L.  jj   in. 

Chaffers,  fig.  466. 

748.  Pair  of  Strainers,  painted  in  underglaze  blue  in    the  Chinese  style.     Mark  on 

each,  a  cross  in  the  same  colour.     About  1775. 

Circular.  The  middle  is  painted  with  a  spray  of  conventional  peony-flowers  and  the  narrow 
rim  with  trellis-diaper.  The  perforations  are  arranged  in  eight  radial,  lines.  Each, 
diam.  4  in. 

749.  Dessert-dish,  plain  white  porcelain.     About   1770. 

In  the  form  of  an  oval  basket  with  low  openwork  sides  imitating  looped  wickerwork  and 
overlaid  at  either  end  with  vine  leaves  in  relief,  the  stem  forming  a  handle.  The  base  is 
strengthened  underneath  by  a  serpentine  ridge  forming  a  support.  H.  2j  in.,  L.  lOfV  i"-> 
W.  7;  in. 

Of  the  same  model  as  two  Worcester  dishes  (No.  503)  and  another  of  Staffordshire  salt- 
glazed  stoneware  (No.  919)   in  the  Collection. 

750.  Dish,  painted    in  colours  and    gilt.     Mark,    a    cross    in    overglaze    blue    enamel. 

About  1775. 

Oval,  with  high  lobed  rim  and  wavy  edge.  The  rim  is  decorated  with  two  gilt  horizontal 
bands  connected  by  two  intertwined  ribbons,  coloured  blue  and  purple  in  imitation  of  silk, 
in  the  interspaces  of  which  are  gilt  rosettes.  From  the  inner  gilt  line  depend  festoons 
of  flowers  in  natural  colours ;  a  bouquet  and  detached  sprays  similarly  painted  are 
scattered  over  the  middle  of  the  dish.  The  base  is  strengthened  with  a  support  similar 
to  that  of  \o.  749.     H.  2^  in.,  L.  iif  in.,  W.  Qj  in. 

Chaffers,  fig.  466.     .\  dish  of  similar  style  is  reproduced  in  Owen,  pi.  vii. 

751.  Sft   of  seven   Trays,   for   dessert,  painted    in   colours.     The  set   is  accompanied 

by  a  polished  wood  circular  stand.     About   1770. 

The  set  consists  of  six  segmental  trays,  of  wavy  outline  on  the  outer  circumference,  fitting 
together  round  a  central  hexagonal  one.  All  the  trays  have  high  sides  sloping  outwards 
from  a  flat  base,  and  are  painted  inside  and  outside  with  slight  formal  borders  of 
varying  design  in  crimson.  The  sides  are  decorated  externally  with  scattered  sprays  of 
flowers  and  detached  leaves  in  natural  colours;  inside  on  the  bottom  of  each  is  a  single 
sprig.  Segmental  trays,  H.  1}  in.,  W.  about  4I  in.  ;  hexagonal  tray,  H.  i\  in.,  W.  4;  in.  ; 
stand,  H.  i'  in.,  diam.  12J  in. 

Compare  with  the  set  in  Plymouth  porcelain  (\'o.  713). 

752.  Pair  of  Vases,  plain  white,  moulded  in  relief.     .About   1770. 

Each  is  of  four-lobed  bulbous  form,  oval  in  section,  with  a  wide  mouth.  On  either  side 
is  a  sheaf  of  conventional  leaves,  at  either  end  a  shell,  and  round  the  mouth  and  base 
are  borders  of  acanthus-foliage,  all  moulded  in  relief.     Each,  H.  2J  in.,  L.  3J  in. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection  ;  sec  p.  viii. 


BRISTOL.  143 

753.  Plate,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt,  Mark,  a  cross  and  i  (No.  57),  said  to  be  the 

mark  of  the  enameller,  Henry  Bone,  in  overglaze  blue  enamel.      About  1775. 
(Plate  81.) 

In  the  middle  are  exotic  birds  among  bushes  ;  the  rim  is  painted  witli  insects  and  sprays  of 
flowers  in  natural  colours,  and  has  a  gilt  wavy  edge.  The  base  is  strengthened  under- 
neath by  a  ring  in  relief  surrounding  the  mark.     Diam.  8j  in. 

This  plate  is  similar  to  the  Bow  plate  (No.  70),  and  was  evidently  made  to  match  the  set 
to  which  it  belonged. 

.■\  similar  piece  is  reproduced  in  Owen,  fig.  6S. 

754.  Two  Plates,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.      Mark  on   each,  a  cross  in  overglaze 

blue  enamel  i_No.  58).     About  1775.     (Plate  85.) 

The   pattern    is    the   same  as  that  of  the  dish  Xo.  750.     The   rim   of   both  plates   has  a  gilt 

lobed  edge,  and  both  are  strengthened  beneath  the  base  by  a  ring  in  relief  surrounding  the 

mark.     Each,  diam.  8  in. 
Compare  note  on  No.  750. 

755.  Two    Plates,    painted    in    colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  6.,    in    gold.      About    1780. 

(Plate  Si.) 

Both  are  saucer-shaped  and  have  a  ring  in  relief  beneath  the  base,  within  the  foot  ring.  They 
are  decorated  with  scattered  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  within  a  band  of  formal 
zigzag  pattern  in  crimson  twined  about  with  a  wavy  stem  of  green  foliage.  Each, 
diam.  7J  in. 

756.  Chocolate-pot,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1770. 

Inverted  pear-shaped  body  merging  by  a  curve  into  the  wide  neck,  projecting  lip  moulded 
w^ith  foliations  coloured  green  and  purple,  loop  handle  in  the  form  of  a  bent  twig.  The 
decoration  consists  of  small  bouquets  and  sprigs  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  scattered 
over  the  surface.     H.  6a  in.,  diam.  4$  in. 

[757.  Mlg,  Plymouth  porcelain,  see  p.   129.] 

758.  Ml-g,    painted    in    colours.      Mark,    a    cross    in    overglaze    greyish-blue    enamel. 

About  1770. 

Inverted  bell-shaped,  with  ribbed  loop  handle.  .\  small  bouquet  and  detached  sprigs  of 
flowers  and  foliage  in  natural  colours  are  scattered  over  the  surface.  Below  the  rim  is  a 
wreath  of  laurel  in  green.     II.  (>\  in.,  diam.  4!   in. 

759.  Mur,,    printed    in    underglaze    blue.      Mark,    a    cross    in    overglaze    blue    enamel. 

.•\bout   1775. 

Cylindrical,  with  ribbed  loop  handle.  The  same  group  of  peony,  prunus,  and  other  flowers  in 
the  Chinese  stvle  is  printed  on  either  side;  round  the  top  and  base  are  borders  in 
Chinese  style  of  floral  and  diaper  ornament  and  cell-pattern  respectively.  H.  3!  in., 
diam.  2|  in. 

760.  Tea-pot  with   Cover   and   Stand,   painted  in  colours    and    gilt.      About  1775. 

(Pl.\te  81.) 

The  tea-pot  has  an  inverted  pear-shaped  body,  curved  spout  with  gilt  foliage  in  relief  on  the 
top,  and  wavy  ribbed  loop  handle,  also  decorated  with  gilt  foliage.  The  domed  cover 
has'  a  knob '  in  the  form  of  an  applied  flower  and  leaf,  painted  in  colours.  The 
hexagonal  stand  has  a  scalloped  slanting  rim.  .Ml  three  pieces  are  decorated  with 
bouquets  and  scattered  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  Tea-pot,  H.  fij  in.,  diam. 
5  in.  ;    stand,  diam.  6i  in. 

761.  Tea-i>ot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours   and  gilt.       Mark,  a  cross  in  dull  over- 

glaze blue  enamel  and  6  in  yellow  (No.  59).     About  1775.     (Pl.\te  81.) 

Barrel-shaped  body  with  curved  spout  gadrooned  at  its  lower  extremity  and  scrolled  loop 
handle  decorated  with  gilt  husk-pattern  in  relief;  slightly  convex  cover  with  knob  in  the 
form  of  a  gilt  bud.    The  upper  part  of  the  body  is  moulded  with  a  band  of  wickerwork 


144  BRISTOL. 

pattern,  from  which  hang  festoons  of  roses  painted  in  natural  colours  ;  a  similar  band  of 
wickcrwork  forms  the  border  of  the  cover,  enclosing  a  wreath  of  roses  in  colours.     Sprigs 
of  similar  roses  are  strewn  over  the  remainder  of  the  surface.     The  spout  is  garlanded  at  its 
springing  with  a  wreath  of  laurel-leaves  in  relief,  painted  green.     11.  5',  in.,  diam.  4^  in. 
Chaffers,  lig.  466. 

762.  Tea-pot    and    Cover,    painted    in    colours.      Mark,     14    in    crimson     (No.    60.) 
About  1780. 

Globular  botly,  curved  foliated  spout,  loop  handle  in  the  form  of  a  bent  twig,  slightly  di.mcci 
cover  with  cone-shaijed  knob.  On  either  side  of  the  body  is  a  loose  bunch  of  flowers  in 
natural  colours;    detached  sprays  arc  painted  on  the  cover.     11.  4}  in.,  diam.  3}  in. 

716.  Tea-1'ot    and    Cover,  painted   in   colours   and    gilt.     Mark,  the   sign   for  tin,    in 
gold  (No.  54).     About  1770.     (Plate  84.) 

Globular  body  with  short  cylindrical  neck,  curved  spout  of  decagonal  section,  and  ribbed  loop 
handle,  domed  cover  surmounted  by  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a  conventional  pine-apple.  The 
ground  of  the  body  and  cover  is  painted  in  blue  enamel  veined  in  darker  blue  in  imitation 
of  marble.  On  this  ground  are  reserved  a  band  of  gilt  cresting  round  the  cover,  the 
shoulder  and  the  base,  and,  on  either  side  of  the  body  and  cover,  a  large  white  panel 
bordered  with  rich  gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  painted  with  a  festoon  of  flowers  and  fruit  in 
natural  colours.  The  spout  is  decorated  with  a  spray  of  similar  flowers  and  the  handle 
with  gilt  scrolls.     H.  gj  in.,  diam.  6|   in. 

The  question  of  the  origin  of  this  tea-pot  and  of  the  coffee-pot  (No.  722)  with  the  same 
decoration  is  fully  discussed  by  Owen  (p.  79)  and  Church  (p.  79).  It  is  the  opinion  of 
these  authors  that,  although  marked  with  the  Plymouth  mark,  they  were  not  made 
until  after  the  transference  of  Cookworthy's  factory  from  Plymouth  to  Bristol  ;  the  basin. 
No.  723,  bearing  the  usual  Plymouth  and  Bristol  marks  combined,  is  cited  in  support  of  this 
view,  and  it  mav  be  noted  that  the  cover  of  this  tea-pot  has  a  knob  similar  to  that  of 
the  Bristol  vase  (No.  740).  On  the  other  hand,  the  flower-painting  on  this  and  similar 
pieces  (Nos.  720,  722)  closely  resembles  that  of  a  garniture  of  vases  (No.  706)  which  is 
generally  ascribed  without  question   to  Plymouth  ;  compare,  however,  note  on  No.  720. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

Church,  fig.  47  ;  Solon,  fig.  57. 

720.  Tea-pot    and    Cover,    painted    in    colours  and    gilt.     Mark,  the  sign    for   tin,   in 
gold.     About  1770. 

Globular  body  with  sliort  cvlindrical  neck,  curved  spout  and  ribbed  loop  handle,  slightly 
domed  cover  with  cone-shaped  knob.  The  ground  of  the  body  and  cover  is  covered 
with  mottled  maroon- coloured  enamel;  on  this  is  reserved,  on  either  side  of  both  body 
and  cover,  a  shaped  panel  bordered  with  richly-gilt  rococo  scrollwork  and  painted  with 
a  festoon  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  A  small  spray  is  painted  underneath  the  spout. 
H.  5f  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

.\  similar  tea-pot  formerlv  in  the  Trapnell  Collection  (compare  Oxford,  CataIoi;ue,  p.  52, 
No.  417)  came  from  "the  Britain  Collection,  in  which  it  was  preserved  "as  a  relic  of 
Champion's  manufacture  from  the  Castle  Green  works."  It  is  probable,  however,  that 
this  and  the  other  pieces  of  like  character  were  made  either  at  Plymouth  or  at  Bristol 
during  Cookworthy's  management;  see  note  on  No.  716. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

722.  Coffee-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About  1770. 

Elongated  pear-shaped  bodv,  with  long  curved  spout  and  ribbed  loop  handle  decorated 
whh  a  gilt  leaf  in  relie'f  at  the  upper  end;  domed  cover  with  knob  in  the  form  of  an 
applied  flower  with  two  leaves,  gilt.  The  ground  of  the  body  and  cover  is  painted 
in  blue  enamel  veined  in  darker  blue  in  imitation  of  marble.  On  this  ground  are 
reserved  a  band  of  gilt  cresting  round  the  cover,  the  mouth  and  the  base,  and  five  large 
shaped  panels,  placed  two,  one  above  the  other,  on  either  side  of  the  body,  and  one 
beneath  the  loop  of  the  handle.  The  panels  are  painted  with  bouquets  or  festoons  of  flowers 
in  natural  colours  and  bordered  with  richly  gilt  rococo  scrollwork.  The  spout  is  decorated 
with  a  bouquet  in  colours  and  the  handle  with  gilt  scrolls.  H.  11^  in.,  diam.  jf  in. 


BRISTOL.  145 

Of  the  same  pattern  as  \o.  716;  compare  note  thereon  as  to  its  place  of  manufacture. 
I'ormerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

iMarryat,  fig.  227;  Jaennicke,  Grundriss  dcr  Keramik,  fig.  3696,  p.  811  ;  Gamier,  Hisloirc  de  hi 
Ceramique,  fig.  159 ;  Chaffers,  fig.  455 ;  Journals,  ii.,  illustration  facing  p.  434. 

763.  Coffee-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours.     About  1775. 

Elongated  pear-shaped  body,  with  long  curved  spout  of  decagonal  section  and  scrolled  loop 
liandle  with  an  acanthus-leaf  in  relief  at  the  upper  end ;  domed  cover  with  cone-shapcil 
knob.  Both  body  and  cover  are  slightly  lobed  and  are  painted  with  a  border  composed 
of  a  wavy  green  ribbon  intertwined  with  feathery  scrolls  in  crimson,  and  with  bouquets 
and  scattered  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  ci>lours.     H.  gj  in.,  diam.  4^   in. 

711.  Jlg,  painted  in  colours.  Mark,  the  sign  for  tin,  in  gold,  nearly  obliterated, 
and  "T"  (?)  impressed.     About  1770.     (Pl.\te  81.) 

Pear-shaped  body  with  loop  handle  (restored  in  plaster)  and  projecting  li])  beneath  which 
is  a  bearded  mask  in  relief  from  the  same  mould  as  the  head  of  the  figure  of  Winter 
in  the  set  of  the  Seasons  (No.  730)  described  above.  The  mask  is  coloured  after  nature. 
Round  the  top  of  the  jug,  below  a  narrow  red  border,  is  a  wavy  green  ribbon  tied  in 
two  bows  and  intertwined  with  scrolls  and  tendrils  in  crimson.  Bunches  and  detached 
sprays  of  flowers,  amongst  which  are  plum-branches  bearing  fruit,  painted  in  natural 
colours,  are  scattered  over  the  remaining  surface.     H.   10  in.,  diam.  7]-  in. 

The  indistinct  impressed  mark  appears  to  be  the  initial  "  T,"  which  is  usually  regarded  as  the 
mark  of  the  modeller  Tebo ;  as  in  the  case  of  Nos.  41  and  43,  it  doubtless  refers  only 
to  the  model  of  the  mask  below  the  spout.  Compare  note  on  Xo.  730,  also  Owen,  p.  242, 
Bnylington  Magazine,  x.w.,  p.   108.     The  border  is  similar  to  that  of  Ko.  763. 

764.  Cab.vket  or  Tea-set  for  a  single  person,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark  on 

each  piece,  a  cross  in  overglaze  blue  enamel ;  also  on  the  sucrier,  crossed  swords 
in  imitation  of  the  mark  of  Meissen  porcelain  in  underglaze  blue,  the  cross 
being  painted  partly  over  it  (No.  61).    "About   1780. 

The  set  consists  of  a  tray,  tea-pot  and  cover,  sucrier  and  cover,  cream-jug,  and  cup  and  saucer 
each  decorated  with  a  row  of  gilt-edged  oval  compartments,  set  midway  between  two 
horizontal  bands  of  husk-pattern  in  green  ;  the  compartments,  the  gilt  edges  of  which 
are  delicately  tooled,  contain  single  rose-sprays,  pointing  alternately  upwards  and  down- 
wards, fiainted  in  natural  colours.  The  tray  is  oval,  with  wavv  shaped  rim  and  a 
serpentine  longitudinal  rib  projecting  beneath  the  base  to  strengthen  it.  The  tea-pot 
is  pear-shaped,  with  short  curved  spout  projecting  from  the  shoulder  and  large  loop 
handle,  both  moulded  in  the  shape  of  a  twig,  and  small  flat-topped  cover  surmounted 
by  a  coloured  rosespray  in  relief.  The  sucrier  is  of  bulbous  form,  with  slightly  domed 
cover,  on  which  also  is  a  rose-spray  in  relief.  The  cream-jug  is  pear-shaped,  with  pro- 
jecting lip  and  loop  handle.  The  cup  is  inverted  bell-shaped,  with  loop  handle.  Trav, 
H.  i|  in.,  I.,  ii]  in.,  W.  7J)  in.:  tea-pot  and  cover,  H.  5^  in.,  diam.  3^  in.;  sucrie'r, 
H.  3j  in.,  diam.  3  in.;  creamjug,  H.  3!  in.,  diam.  7^^  in.  ;  cup,  H.  2J  in.,  diam.  2,'.  in.; 
saucer,  diam.  4,  in. 
Tea-pot,  Chaffers,  fig.  ^(,(i.     The  pattern  is  the  same  as  that  of  No.  775. 

765.  Crf.am-jl'g,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  black  and  green.     .Mark,  a   cross 

and  6.,  in  overglaze  blue  enamel  (No.  62).     About  1780. 

The  body  is  spirally  flute<l,  with  wavy  edge  and  projecting  lip,  the  flutes  being  moulded 
at  their  lower  end  with  frond-like  foliage;  festoons  of  flowers  in  grey  outline  washed 
over  with  green  enamel  are  painted  round  the  outside.  Loop  handle  of  scrolled  form. 
H.  2;';  in.,  I..  4^  in. 

766.  Plate,    painted    in   red    and    gilt.      .Mark,    ;i    cross    in    overglaze    blue  eiinmcl. 

About  1780. 

The  narrow  scalloped  rim  has  a  gilt   edge  and    a    border   composed    of    a    wide   red  band 
twined  about  with  a  gilt  ribbon.     Diam.  6J  in. 
X     l'.)2.-.9  s. 


146 


BRISTOL. 


767.  SuCRiF.R  AND  CovER,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     .Vbout  1780. 

Of  the  same  form  as  the  sucrier  in  the  cahurel,  \o.  76.^.  Round  the  edge  of  both  pieces 
is  a  narrow  border  in  black  and  green  painted  to  imitate  marble,  edf^ed  with  gilt 
scrolls  <ind  foliage.  The  remaining  surface  is  decorated  with  scattered  bouquets  and 
sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.     H.  3;  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 

768.  Spoon-tray,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.      Mark,   i.,  said  to  be  tiie  mark  of  the 

enameller,  Henry  Bone,  in  gold  (No.  68).     About   1775. 

Of  shaped  oval  form,  with  wavy  rim  decorated  with  festoons  of  flowers  and  garlands  of 
laurel  in  natural  colours,  tied  with  pink  ribbons,  with  gilt  leafy  ornament  at  intervals. 
.\  spray  of  flowers  in  colours  occupies  the  middle.     I,.  6  yj  'n>  W.  4I  in. 

769.  Chocolate-cup    with  Cover    and    Saucer,  painted    in    colours    and    gilt.     Mark 

on  the  saucer,  a  cross  and  2.,  said  to  be  the  mark  of  the  enameller,  William 
Stephens,  in  overglaze  blue  enamel  (No.  63).     About  1775. 

The  cup  has  two  scrolled  loop  handles :  the  domed  cover  has  a  knob  in  the  form  of  a 
green  apple  with  foliage,  applied  in  relief.  Each  piece  is  decorated  with  festoons  of 
flowers  in  natural  colours  hung  from  a  gilt  horizontal  line.  Cup  and  cover,  H.  4J  in.. 
W.  5I  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  5I  in. 

For  the  significance  of  the  mark,  see  Owen,  p.  235,  and  O.xford,  Catalogue,  Trapnell  Collection, 
p.  xviii. 

770.  Portion  of  a  Service,  painted  in  colours  and    gilt,  consisting    of   a    bread-and- 

butter  plate,  sugar-basin  and  cover,  two  chocolate-cups,  two  tea-cups  and 
saucers,  and  two  coffee-cups.  Made  for  William  Cowles.  Mark,  on  the 
chocolate-cups  and  one  tea-cup',  a  cross  in  overglaze  blue  enamel  and  i., 
said  to  be  the  mark  of  the  enameller,  Henry  Bone,  in  gold,  accompanied  on 
the  chocolate-cups  by  the  date  1776,  also  in  gold  (No.  69).     (Plate  81.) 

The  plate  is  saucer-shaped,  with  a  circular  ridge  underneath,  within  the  foot-ring,  to 
strengthen  the  base.  The  sugar-basin,  chocolate-  and  coffee-cups  are  of  ogeeform,  the 
cups  having  scrolled  loop  handles.  The  domed  cover  of  the  sugar-basin  is  surmounted 
by  a  flower  with  foliage,  applied  in  relief  within  a  painted  laurel  wreath.  The  tea- 
cijps  have  no  handles.  Each  piece  is  decorated  with  a  bouquet  and  scattered  sprays 
of  flowers  in  natural  colours,  and  with  the  monogram  "  WC "  in  duplicate,  in  gold 
within  a  green  laurel-wreath.  This  monogram  is  placed  in  the  centre  of  the  plate  and 
saucers,  on  one  side  of  the  sugar-basin,  outside,  and  inside  on  the  bottom  of  each  of 
the  cups.  Plate,  diam.  75  in. ;  sugar-basin  and  cover,  H.  5]  in,,  diam.  45  in. ; 
chocolate-cups,  each  H.  3j  in.,  diam.  3j  in.:  tea-cups,  H.  i^  in.,  diam.  3I  in.;  saucers, 
diam.  5  in.  ;  coffee-cups,  H.  2\  in.,  diam.  2;  in. 

This  service  was  made  for  William  Cowles,  merchant,  of  Xo.  33,  Castle  Green,  Bristol.  ,\ 
tea-cup  and  saucer  are  in  the  British  .Museum  (Xo,  viii.  22)  ;  another  chocolate-cup  is 
shown  in  Ow-en,  fig.  55. 

Formerly  in  the  Prideaux  Collection. 

771.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer,  painted    in  colours  and    gilt.     Mark,  on    both  pieces,  3.  in 

gold,  accompanied  on  the  saucer  by  crossed  swords  in  imitation  of  the  mark 
of  Meissen  porcelain,  in  underglaze  blue  (No.  67).     About  1775. 

The  cup  is  decorated  outside  and  the  saucer  inside  with  a  band  of  arched  gilt  scrolls 
connected  by  S-shaped  gilt  scrolls  with  the  rim  and  twined  about  with  vva\y  garlands 
of  flowers  painted  in  natural  colours.  The  cup  has  a  shaped  loop  handle.  Cup,  H.  ij  in., 
diam.  3   in. ;  saucer,   diam.  jj  in. 


BRISTOL.  147 

772.  Tea-cup    and    Saucer,    painted     in  colours    in    imitation    of   Cliinese    porcelain. 

Mark,  a  cross  and  16,  in  overglaze  blue  enamel  (No.  64).     About  1780. 

The  cup  is  painted  outside  and  the  saucer  inside  with  a  Chinese  lady  holding  an  umbrella, 
standing  with  a  child  at  her  side  in  a  garden  ;  to  the  left  of  her  is  a  parrot  perched 
on  a  stand.  Inside  botli  pieces  is  a  border  of  chain-pattern  in  red.  The  cup  has  no 
handle.     Cup,  H.  i|  in.,  diam.  3^  in.;  saucer,  diam.  5  in. 

773.  Two     Tea-cups    and    Saucers,    painted    in    colours.      Mark,  a    cross    and  7.,  in 

overglaze  blue  enamel  (No.  65).     About  1780. 

The  cups  are  inverted  bell-shaped  without  handles,  and,  like  the  saucers,  have  a  wavy  edge, 
coloured  brownish-crimson.  The  cups  are  decorated  outside  and  the  saucers  inside  on 
the  rim  with  festoons  of  flowers,  in  black  outline  fdled  in  with  green.  Cups,  H.  2  in., 
diam.  2|  in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  4^  in. 

Kor  reasons  not  stated  this  pattern  has  been  called  the  "  Horace  Walpole  pattern." 

774.  Tea  cup    and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     Mark  on    both  pieces,  3.  in 

gold  ;  also  on  the  saucer,  crossed  swords  in  imitation  of  the  mark  on  Meissen 
porcelain,  in  underglaze  blue  (No.  66).     x\bout  1780. 

Bell-shaped  cup  with  shaped  loop  handle.  The  cup  is  decorated  outside  and  llie  saucer 
inside  with  festoons  of  foliage,  in  grey  washed  over  with  green,  hanging  from  tlie  rim 
and  passing  over  oblique  lines  of  gold  which  spring  at  their  lower  end  from  a  band  of 
scallops,  also  in  grey  and  green.  In  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  small  gilt  rosette. 
Cup,  H.  3}  in.,  diam.   2I    in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  5J  in. 

775.  Two  Coffee-cups,  paitend    in    colours  and    gilt.     Mark,    a    cross    in     overglaze 

blue  enamel  and  3.  in  gold  (No.  70).     About  1780. 

The  cups  are  cylindrical,  with  scrolled  loop  handle  moulded  in  relief  with  liusk  pattern,  f  ilt : 
the  saucers  have  a  high  slanting  rim.  The  cups  are  decorated  outside  and  the  saucers 
inside  with  a  row  of  gilt-edged  oval  compartments,  set  midway  between  two  horizontal 
bands  of  husk-pattern  in  green  ;  the  compartments,  the  gilt  edges  of  which  are  delicatelv 
tooled,  contain  single  rose-sprigs,  pointing  alternately  upwards  and  downwards,  painted 
in  natural  colours.     Cups,  H.  2^  in.,  diam.  2|  in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  5^-  in. 

Owen,  fig.  34.     The  pattern  is  the  same  as  that  of  \o.  775. 

776.  Two  Coffee-cups  and    Saucers,  painted  in   colours  and  gilt.     Mark  on   all  the 

pieces,  a  cross  in  overglaze  blue  enamel,  accompanied    on  the  saucers  by  4.  in 
the  same  colour  (No.  71).     About  1780. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  775.  The  cups  are  decorated  outside  and  the  saucers  inside  with 
two  wide  bands  of  scale-pattern  in  crimson,  edged  with  gold  and  enclosed  between  two 
narrower  bands  of  green  liusk-pattern.  A  gilt  rosette  occupies  the  centre  of  the  saucers. 
Cups,  H.  2f  in.,  diam.  2:]  in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  5^  in. 

777.  Coffee-cup  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and   gilt.       Mark,  a  cross  in  over- 

glaze blue  enamel,  and   i.,  said  to  be  the  mark  of  the  enameller,  Henry  Bone, 
in  gold  (No.  72).     About  1780. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  775.  The  cup  is  painted  outside  and  the  saucer  on  the  rim  with 
twisted  festoons  of  pearls  between  two  horizontal  liands  of  prein  liinK-n;itt,.,„  (-,,., 
H.  2J  in.,  diam.  2^  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  5}  in. 

Owen,  fig.  30. 

K  -2 


148 


BRISTOL. 


778.  CoFFKK-'cup  AND  Saucer,  puiiitpd  in   puiple  and  gilt.     Mark,  a  cross  in  overglax.e 

blue  enamel  and  2,  said  to  be  the  mark  of  the  enameller,  William  Stephens,  in 
gold.     About  1780. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  775.  The  dcroration,  on  the  outside  of  the  cup  and  on  the  rim 
of  the  saucer,  consists  of  a  band  of  gilt  chain-pattern,  carefully  tooled,  between  two  gilt 
lines  each  twined  about  with  a  ribbon  in  purple.  Cup,  H.  2^  in.,  diam.  2j  in. ;  saucer, 
diam.  5J-  in. 

See  note  on  No.  769. 

779.  Two  Coffee-cups    and  Saucers,  painted   in   colours   and   gilt.     Mark   on   both 

saucers,  5  in  gold,  also  on  one  of  them,  crossed  swords  in  imitation  of  the  mark 
on  Meissen  porcelain,  in  underglaze  blue  (No.  73. j     About  1780. 

The  cups  are  bordered  outside  and  the  saucers  inside  with  gilt  rosettes  connected  by  S-shaped 

scrolls   in    red,   which  are    intertwined   with  narrow   stems   of   foliage   in  grey  and  green. 

Small   gilt  sprigs   are  scattered   over    the    remaining    surface.       Cups,   H.   2|  in.,  diam. 

2J  in. ;  saucers,  diam.  5^  in. 

780.  1  WO  Coffee-cups,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.      Inside  on  the  bottom   of  each, 

accompanied  by  the  date  1774  and  a  cross,  the  mark  of  the  Bristol  factory, 
are  the  initials  "  I  H,"  in  crimson,  said  to  be  those  of  Joseph  Harford,  iron 
merchant,  of  Bristol. 

Erich  has  a  loop  handle  in  the  form  of  a  bent  twig  and  is  painted  with  festoons  of  flowers 
in  natural  colours  hanging  from  a  border  of  narrow  gilt  scrolls.  Each,  H.  25  in.,  diam., 
2j  in. 

In  the  opinion  of  Owen  (pp.  94,  189)  the  service  to  which  these  cups  belong  was  more  probably 
made  for  Joseph  Mickey,  a  friend  of  the  statesman,  Edmund  Burke,  and  London  agent 
for  the  Bristol  porcelain  works.  Joseph  Harford,  with  whom  the  service  is  traditionally 
associated,  was  one  of  the  partners  with  Champion  in  the  ownership  of  the  factory  in 
the  years  1768-9.     Another  cup  from  the  service  is  reproduced  by  Owen  (fig.  43). 


IX.— CAUGHLEV 


FROM  the  year  1772  onwards  porcelain  was  made  at  a  potterv 
previously  in  existence  at  Caughley,  near  Broseley,  in  Shropshire. 
The  introduction  of  the  manufacture  was  due  to  Thomas  Turner, 
who  came  from  Worcester.  The  earlier  productions  were  for  the  most 
part  decorated  by  printing  under  the  glaze  in  blue  of  peculiar  brilliancv, 
a  type  unrepresented  in  the  Collection;  if  the  jug  (No.  122)  is  rightly 
assigned  to  Caughley  it  would  appear  that  printing  in  black  over  the 
glaze  was  also  sometimes  adopted.  In  1799  the  works  were  purchased 
by  John  Rose,  of  the  neighbouring  Coalport  factory,  and  their  activitv 
steadily  lessened,  until  about  1814  they  were  finally  demolished.  A 
characteristic  style  of  decoration  in  underglaze  blue  and  gold '  belongs 
to  the  last  few  years  of  the  iSth  centur}',  being  clearly  inspired  by  the 
Worcester  porcelain  of  the  Flight  period  of  management. 

Amongst  the  marks  used  at  Caughley  are  the  initials  "  S  "  and  "  C  '" 
printed  in  blue  under  the  glaze.  The  "S"  indicates  "Salopian,"  the 
name  by  which  the  porcekiin  was  generally  known. 

Nos.  781-783. 

These  pieces  are  variously  decorarted  with  painting,  printing  or  gilding. 
The  blue  decoration  in  every  case,  whether  painted  or  printed,  is  under 
the  glaze. 

781.  Jug,  painted  in  blue  under  the   glaze,  and  decorated  over  it  in  enamel  colours 

and  gold.     Mark,  "' S  "  in  blue,  barred  over  with  gold  as  though  to  conceal  it. 

.About  1790.     (Pl.\te  86.) 

The  form  is  borrowed  from  Worcester  porcelain  and  is  the  samp  as  that  of  the  Worcester 
jug  No.  540.  On  the  front  are  the  initials  "SB"  in  monogram,  In  a  circular  medallion 
with  a  border  of  beads  in  gold,  and  on  either  side  are  bouquets  and  scattered  spravs  of 
flowers  in  brown,  yellow  and  gold,  with  touches  of  dull  green.  Round  the  top  and 'base 
are  borders  of  gilt  chain-pattern  on  a  dark  blue  band,  edged  with  a  wavy  wreath  of 
gilt  foliage.     H.  8}  in.  diam.  6  in. 

782.  jiG,  painted  in  blue  and  gilt.     About  1790.     (Pl.\te  87.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  i\o.  781.  The  body  and  neck  are  decorated  with  branches  of  con- 
ventional foliage  in  gold  and  flowers  "in  blue.  Round  the  shoulder  and  rim  are  formal 
borders  In  blue  and  gold.     H.  y-}  in.,  diam.  4J  in. 

iNos.  781,  782,  783. 


I50  CAUGHLEY. 

790.  JL'G,  printed  in  blue  with  the  royai  arms  of  King  George  III.  as  borne  before  1802 
and  with  figures  of  volunteers.  'I'he  royal  arms  are  also  impressed  from  a  seal 
on  the  base  (Mark  No.  74).  Inside  the  rim  is  the  inscription  "  BRIMSTREE 
LOY.'VL  LEGION."     About  1795.     (Pl.\th  87.) 

of  ihe  same  form  as  No.  781.  The  arms,  which  arc  accompanied  bv  a  crowned  helmet, 
lloral  emblems,  the  supporters,  and  the  mottoes  •' HOXI  SOIT  QUI  .\I.\L  Y  PEXSE  " 
and  "  DIEU  ET  MON  DROIT,"  are  set  in  the  midst  of  a  trophy  of  flags  and  weapons, 
(lanked  on  either  side  by  the  same  print  representing  two  volunteers  standing  at 
attention  as  sentries  beside  a  flagstaff.  Above  this  group,  which  is  repeated  on  either 
side  of  the  neck,  is  placed  on  one  side  of  the  body  another  print  representing  a-bodyof 
troops  on  parade.  The  inscription  is  placed  on  a  garter  forming  a  border  inside  the 
neck.  H.  8  in.,  diam.  5  in. 
lirimstree  is  the  name  of  a  hundred  in  Shropshire,  in  the  immediate  neighbourhood  of 
Caughley.  The  jug  was  doubtless  made  for  the  u.se  of  a  corps  of  volunteers  in  the 
time  of  the  war  with  France  during  the  last  decade  of  the  i8th  century  ;  it  may  be 
dated  between  1794,  when  the  volunteer  movement  began,  and  the  Peace  of  Amiens,  1802. 

122.   I'JG,  printed  in  black.     About   1775. 

Pear-shaped,  with  projecting  lip  and  loop  handle.  On  one  side  is  a  Chinese  lady 
attended  by  two  children,  one  of  whom  holds  a  parasol  over  her  head ;  on  the  other 
side  are  two  youths  in  European  dress  of  the  period,  playing  at  battledore  and 
shuttlecock,  with  rococo  scrollwork  below.  H.  4J  in.,  diam.  3^  in. 
This  piece  is  conjecturally  attributed  to  Caughley.  The  paste  shows  by  transmitted  light 
the  warm  yelluwisli  tune  characteristic  of  Caughley  porcelain. 

783.  I'-MiJ  OF  Mugs,  painted  in  blue  and  gilt.     About  1790.     (Pl.\te  87.) 

Cylindrical,  with  grooved  loop  handle.  Decorated  with  two  conventional  floral  designs  set 
alternately  with  vertical  bands  of  formal  ornament  between  them.  H.  4^  in.,  4J  in., 
diam.  35  in.,  3^  in.  respectively. 


X.— LIM'RPOOL. 


PORCELAIN  was  made  at  several  of  the  potteries  which  ilourishcd 
at  Liverpool  in  the  iSth  century.  Richard  Chaflers,  who  died 
in  1765,  appears  from  an  advertisement  to  have  been  making 
it  as  early  as  1756.  Amongst  other  potters  who  produced  porcelain 
at  a  slightly  later  period  were  Samuel  Gilbody,  Philip  Christian, 
Seth  and  John  Pennington,  and  Zachariah  Barnes.  Porcelain  was 
also  made  from  about  1800  onwards  at  "  Herculaneum,"  a  pottery 
established  near  Liverpool  in  1796,  on  the  right  bank  of  the  Mersey. 

The  Schreiber  Collection  contains  no  specimens  of  Herculaneum 
porcelain,  all  the  pieces  belonging  to  the  earlier  period  of  manufacture 
at  Liverpool.  In  the  absence  of  marks  or  signatures  of  potters  it  is 
impossible  to  assign  the  specimens  to  their  several  makers  ;  all  are 
decorated  with  black  transfer  prints,  executed  at  the  printing  works 
established  in  the  city  about   1756  by  John  Sadler  and  Guy  Green. 


Nos.  784-789. 

The  prints  on  all  these  pieces  are  o\cn-  the  glaze  in  black  ;   Xo.  789 
has  also  slight  painted  decoration  ni  the  same  colour. 

784.  Mug,    printed    in    black    wilh    a    bust    ]Hiitrait    of    "Major    General    Wolfe" 

(b.    1727,    d.    1759).     The    print    is  signed    "J.  Sadler  Liverpool."     About    1770. 
(Plate  87.) 

Carrel-shaped,  with  scrolled  loop  handle.  The  bust  is  flanked  by  rococo  scrollwork  supporting 
two  tropiiies,  of  arras,  funeral  monuments  and  flags  ;  two  of  the  flags  are  inscribed  with 
the  names  of  his  engagements  "  Louisbourg"  and  "Quebec."  H.  3J  in.,  diam.  3  in. 
Made  to  commemorate  Wolfe's  victory  and  death  at  Quebec  in  1759.  The  print  appears  to 
be  based  on  a  portrait  by  Thomas  Gainsborough,  reproduced  in  The  Century  Ma};azine, 
iVno  Series,  xxxiii,  p.  3:2. 

785.  Mug,  printed  in  black  witli    a    half-lengtli    jjortrait    of    "  Tiie    Illustrious  Prince 

Ferdinand  of   Brunswick"   (b.    1721,  il.    1792).     The    print  is   signed  "Sadler 
Up'."     (Pl.ate  87.) 

The  portrait  is  flanked   on   one  side   by  a   battle-scene,  on    the   other   by   a    sliicld  with  the 
arms  of    Prussia  amid  a  trophy  of  arms  and  flags,  one  of  Which  is  inscribed  •' Minden." 
The  mug  is  mounted  with  a  silver  rim  chased  wilh  rococo  scrollwork.     H.  3^  in.,  diam. 
3i  in- 
Made  to  commemorate  the  battle  of  .Minden,  1759. 


152  Ll\"l'Ul'()()I.. 

612.  CiM-TEE-POT  AND  CovEK,  printed  in  black  by  John  Sadler. 

The  form  is  the  same  as  that  of  the  Worcester  coffee-pot  No.  61 1,  except  that  the  cover 
lias  a  cone-shaped  knob.  On  one  side  of  the  body  is  a  print  of  a  lady  standing  under 
a  tree  beside  a  man,  who  sits  playing  a  flute,  whilst  two  children  dance  in  front  of  them. 
On  the  other  side  is  Harlequin  seated  with  a  lady  on  a  seat,  with  needlework  on  a  table 
beside  it,  before  a  tree,  from  behind  which  Pierrot  is  seen  approaching.  The  cover  is 
decorated  with  a  wreath  of  interlacing  rococo  scrollwork.     H.  yj  in.,  diam.  35  in. 

The  first-named  print  occurs  also  on  a  tile  of  "delft"  ware  (No.  845)  and  a  tea-pot  of 
cream-coloured  earthenware  (No.  1107},  the  second  on  a  "delft"  tile  (No.  840)  and,  in 
combination  with  scrollwork  of  the  same  pattern  as  on  the  cover,  on  a  sugar-basin  of 
cream-coloured  earthenware  (No.  11 13)  in  the  Schreiber  Collection,  all  printed  at  Liver- 
pool. Compare  Burlington  Magazine,  Vol.  vi.,  article  by  John  Hodgkin,  Transfer  Printing 
on   Pottery,  pp.   319,  320. 

[786.  Two  S.\UCE-B0.\TS,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  89.] 

[787.  Two  Jugs,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  pp.  95,  96.] 

[788.  Jug,  Worcester  porcelain,  see  p.  96.] 

789.  Two  TE.\-crPS  .\n'd  S.xuceks,  printed  and  painted  in  black.  On  one  side  ol 
the  cup  and  saucer  is  a  group  of  figures  beside  a  monumental  fountain,  from 
the  painting  by  Antoine  Watteau,  now  in  the  Wallace  Collection,  known  as 
"La  Cascade,"  which  was  engraved  by  G.  Scotin.     About  1760.     (Plate  87.) 

The  cups,  which  have  no  handle,  are  printed  on  the  reverse  side  with  figures  of  a  shepherdess 
and  a  seated  mandoline-player  with  sheep  in  a  landscape.  Inside  both  cups  and  saucers 
is  a  painted  border  of  scallops  and  dots.  Cups,  H.  i|  in.,  diam.  3  in.,  2|  in.  respec- 
tively ;  saucers,  diam.  4I  in. 

[790.  Jug,  Caughley  porcelain,  see  p.   150.] 


XL— STAFFORDSHIRE    PORCELAIN   OF   THE    19111   CENTURY 


THE    Collection    contains    only   a   few    selected    specimens    of    the 
porcelain  of    the  numerous  factories  in  Staffordshire  which  came 
into   existence    or  first    began    to    manufacture    porcelain    in    the 
early  years  of  the  19th  century. 

vj    I.   LOXGPORT. 

Xo.  791. 

Porcelain  was  manufactured,  with  otlier  wares,  at  Longport,  near 
Burslem,  by  the  firm  established  in  1793  by  John  Davenport  and 
carried  on  by  his  descendants  till  1882.^  In  the  earlier  productions 
the  style  of  the  Derby  porcelain  of  the  time  was  imitated.  The  mark 
used  was  the  name  of  the  firm,  sometimes  accompanied  by  an  anchor, 
printed  or  impressed. 

791.  Tea-cup  and  Saucer,  decorated  with  K'lding  an<l  painted  en  canuucn  in  grey 
on  a  sage-green  ground.  Mark,  "  Davenport,  longport,"'  printed  in  red 
(No.  78).     .\bout  1825. 

The  cup  is  painted  outside  and  the  saucer  un  the  rim  with  sheep  in  a  landscape  reserved  en 
camdieu  on  a  green  ground,  between  gilt  borders  of  bead  and  lotus-llower  ornament. 
Inside  the  cup  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  large  gilt  rosette.  Cup,  H.  3  in., 
diam.  2j  in. ;  saucer,  diam.  5  in. 
Bought  at  Dresden  on  .\ugust  7th,  1869,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  29,  "  I  have  to  enumerate  from 
Wolfsohn's  ....  green  cup  and  saucer,  imitating  'Empire'  Sevres,  signed  Davenport, 
Longport,  12s." 
Solon,  fig.  791. 

[792.  Jug,  porcelain,  of  uncertain  origin,  see  p.   164.] 

[793-796.  Group,  etc.,  Rockingham  porcelain,  see  pp.  156,  157.] 

[797-799.  Inkstand,  etc.,  Lowestoft  porcelain,  see  p[).  159,  160.] 

>^   2.   SrOKE-UPOX-TRF.NT  (SPODE). 

Nos.  800 — 802. 

Porcelain  was  first  made  about  1800  at  the  potteiy  established  by 
josiah  Spode  at  Stoke-upon-Trent,  and  carried  on  after  his  deatli  in 
1797  by  his  son    of   the   same  name.     In  1833  the    manufacture  passed 

^  See  Rhead,  p.  92. 


154 


STAFFORDSHIRE. 


inlo   the    liaiuls    (if    William    Tavlor  Copclaiui,    by    wlicsc  family   it    is 
still  conducted. 

In  the  porcelain  made  (.luring  the  Spode  management  excellence  of 
material  is  combined  with  the  florid  decoration  characteristic  of  the 
period.  The  mark  employed  was  the  name  "Spode"  usually  accom- 
panied by  a  pattern-number,  variously  executed;  in  the  three  pieces 
described  below,  all  of  which  are  decorated  with  painting  and  gilding 
over  the  glaze,  the  mark  also  is  written  over  the  glaze  in  various 
colours.  The  decoration  of  each  is  in  rich  enamel  colours  and  gilding, 
in  the  case  of  Nos.  8oi  and  S02  partly  over  a  ground  of  dark  underglaze 
blue. 

800.  \'.vsi-:  AND  Covr.R.     Mark,  "spode  "  in  brown  (No.  77).     About  1825.     rPi..\TE  88.) 

Ovoiil  body  painted  in  natural  colours  on  one  side  with  a  bouquet,  and  on  the  other  with  an 
overturned  basket  of  (lowers,  and  with  two  butterflies,  against  a  shaded  brown  ground. 
Domed  perforated  cover  with  a  gilt  knob  in  the  form  of  a  pod,  two  gilt  loop  handles 
rising  from  the  slioulder,  high  foot  supported  on  a  square  plintli  with  a  border  of  gilt 
conventional  ornament.     H.  7^  in.,  W.  4  in. 

801.  \'inLET-p.'\.SKET.     Mark,  "  spodh   1166"  in  reck     About  1820. 

Oval  with  scalloped  edge,  perforated  convex  cover,  and  loop  handle  on  the  cover  and  at 
either  end  of  the  basket.  Painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours  reserved  on 
a  ground  of  dark  underglaze  blue  overlaid  with  gilt  scale-pattern.  H.  i  j  in.,  L.  4j  in., 
W.  2|  in. 

Bought  at  Exeter  on  September  15th,  1869.  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  37,  "The  only  thing  the 
small  shops  at  Exeter  presented  was  a  little  .Spode  basket  at  Mrs.  Guertos." 

802.  Box  .\ND  Cover.     Mark,  "spode   1166"  in  red  (No.  80). 

Circular,  painted  inside  and  out  with  sprays  of  llowers  in  natural  colours,  reserved  except 
in  the  middle  of  the  cover  on  a  ground  of  dark  underglaze  blue  overlaid  with  gilt 
scale-pattern.     The  cover  is  slightly  convex.     H.   i]  in.,  diam.  2*  in. 


§  3.   STOKE-UPOX-TRENT  (MIXTOX). 

Xo.  803. 

The  factory  ('arried  on  at  the  present  time  at  Stoke  by  Mintons, 
Limited  came"  into  operation  in  1796  under  the  direction  of  Thomas 
Minton,  who  had  previously  worked  at  Caughley  and  elsewhere  as  an 
engraver  of  copper-plates  for  printing  on  pottery.  Porcelain  is  said 
to  have  been  added  to  the  productions  of  the  factory  in  1798,  and 
appears  to  have  been  made  continuously  from  that  time  forward.' 
The    mark    usually    employed   until    1861  consisted    of    double  "S"  in 

^  Compare  Burton,  English  Porcelain,  p.   173. 


STAFFORDSHIRE.  155 

imitation  of  tlie  Sevres  mark,  with  "M"  below,  generally  in  blue  enamel 
over  the  glaze.  In  addition  to  the  pieces  described  below,  No.  470 
was  also  probably  made  at  the  Minton  factory. 

803.  Pair  of  Beakers,  painted  in  entimel  colours  and  gilt.     Mark,  double  "  S  "  above 
"  M,"  in  overglaze  blue  (No.  79).     (Plate  88.) 

The  beakers  are  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours,  on  one  yellow  globe-flower 
and  purple  peony,  on  the  other,  pink  and  yellow  mallow  and  purple-striped  double 
anemone.  A  gilt  band  encircles  tlio  rim  and  base  of  both  pieces.  H.  4f  in.,  4!  in. 
respectively,  diam.  4  in. 


>j  4.  HAXLF.Y. 
Xo.  Soyi. 

Amongst  the  factories  producing  porcelain  at  Hanley  w^as  that  of 
John  Shorthose  &  Co.,  stated  to  have  come  to  an  end"  about  1823.' 
The  mark  used  was  the  name  of  the  firm,  sometimes  accompanied  by 
crescents. 

803a.  Tea-ci;p  and  S.aucer,  printed  in  underglaze  blue.    Mark  on  the  saucer,  "  Shorthose 
&  Co."  and  two  crescents,  printed  in  the  same  colour  (No.  81).     About  1800. 

The  cup  is  printed  outside  and   the  saucer  inside  with  pheasants  and  other  birds  perched  on 
a  tree  or  flying.     The  cup  has  no  handle.     Cup,  H.  i  J  in.,  diam.  2^  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  4J  in. 


§  5.  STAFFORDSHIRE   {MAXrFACTL-RE   UNCERTAIN). 
Nos.   354,  470. 

In  the  absence  of  marks  it  is  impossible  to  assign  these  pieces  with 
certainty  to  any  one  of  the  Staffordshire  factories  in  particular. 

354.  Two     Plates,    inoulded     in     relief     and    painted    in    colours    over    the    glaze. 
.About  1810. 

The  rim  has  a  scalloped  edge  and  is  mouldo<l  with  trellis-pattern,  with  small  vellow  flowers 
applied  at  the  points  of  intersection,  Tho  middle  is  painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in 
natural  colours.     Diam.  7I  in. 

470.  Mug,  printed  in  crimson  from  a  stipple-engraved  plate  and  gilt.     About  1820. 

Cylindrical,  with   foliated   loop   handle  and  moulded  base.      The  print   on   the  front  of  the 

mug   depicts   a  shepherd   addressing   a    girl  who  kneels   to   draw   water  from   a   stream. 

H.  4'  in.,  diam.  yl  in. 
This  piece    is   probably  an   early  production   of   the  Minton   factory  at  Stoke-upon-Trcnt,  at 

which  stipple-printed  decoration  was  extensively  used. 

'  Chaffc-rs.  Marks  atul  A Aum "171  njs,  p.  701. 


XII.— SWINTON   (ROCKINGHAM   WORKS). 


IN  iSio  experiments  were  made  for  the  production  of  porcelain  at 
the  pottery  of  Brameld  &  Co.,  on  the  estate  of  the  Marquis  of 
Rockingham,  at  Swinton,  near  Rotherham,  in  Yorkshire,  but  it 
did  not  become  part  of  the  regular  output  of  the  establishment  till 
1826,  in  which  year  the  factory  received  assistance  from  Earl  Fitzwilliam 
and  assumed  the  title  of  "Rockingham  Works";  porcelain  continued 
to  be  made  there  till  1842,  when  the  works  were  closed.  The  mark 
used,  in  several  variations,  consisted  of  the  name  of  the  works  and  the 
proprietors  below  a  griffin,  the  crest  of  Earl  Fitzwilliam,  printed  in 
various  colours.  The  title  "  Royal "  prefixed  to  the  name  indicates 
pieces  made  after  1830,  when  the  factory  received  an  order  from 
William  IV.,  and  the  words  "Manufacturer  to  the  King"  those  made 
during  his  reign  (i 830-1 S37).  Another  mark  occasionally  found  is  an 
applied  oval  medallion  with  the  name  "Brameld"  in  relief  within  a 
wreath  of  the  national  floral  emblems. 

Nos.  793-796- 
These  pieces  are  all  decorated  over  the  glaze  in  enamel  colours  and 
gold,  in  the  case  of  No.  796  over  a  printed  outline. 

793.  Group.     Two  greyhounds  and  a  dead  hare.     About  1830. 

One  of  the  hounds,  which  are  coloured  after  nature,  is  sitting  up,  the  otlior  lying  down,  on 
an  oval  rocky  base  coloured  green.     H.   2}  in.,  L.  4I  in.,  W.  2J   in. 

794.  V.\SF.  AND  Cover.      Mark,  a  griffin,  and    "Rockingham  Wovks  Brameld,"   printed 

in    red;  also   an    applied    oval    medallion    moulded    in    relief    with    the    name 

"  BRAMELD  "  within  a  wreath  of  roses,  thistles  and  shamrock  (No.  87).    1826-1830. 

Of  hexagonal  section  with  bulbous  body,  spreading  base,  short  neck,  and  wide-rimmed  domed 

cover    surmounted   by    a   gilt    figure   of    a   seated   monkey.       Both    vase    and   cover   are 

painted  with  butterflies  and  bouquets  and  sprays  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.     H.  12  in., 

diam.  3^  in. 

795.  Toy  Tea-pot,  decorated  with  applied  flowers  modelled  in  relief.     Mark,  a  griflui, 

and    "Rockingham    Works     Brameld    Manufacturer    to    the    King,"    printed    in 
crimson  (No. "86).     1830-1837. 

Depressed  pear-shaped  body  with  short  curved  spout  and  loop  handle  in  the  form  of  green 
twigs  from  which  spring  the  flowers  in  relief,  coloured  after  nature,  which  are  applied 
to  the  body;  the  domed  cover  is  similarly  decorated  with  flowers.     H.  2i  in.,  diam.  2|  in 


SWINTOX.  15 

796.  Plate,  printed  in  black  outline  and  painted  in  colours  with  gilding,  in 
imitation  of  Chinese  porcelain  of  the  famillc  verte.  Mark,  a  griffin,  and 
"Royal  Rock'"  Works  Brameld,"  printed  in  crimson  (No.  88).  1830-1842. 
(Pl.\te  85.) 

Octagonal.  The  middle  is  circular  and  is  painted  with  flowering  plants,  /ungi,  and  grotesque 
birds.  The  rim  is  decorated,  w'ithin  a  formal  border  in  red,  with  fldwers  on  a  green 
ground  on  which  are  reserved  four  shaped  panels,  enclosing  alternately  a  bird  and  a 
beetle  among  flowers.     Diam.  g^  in. 


XIII.— LOWF.STOFT. 


A  PORCELAIN  factory  was  established  at  Lowestoft,  in  Suffolk,  in 
1757,  after  an  unsuccessful  attempt  in  the  neighbourhood  in  the 
previous  year.  In  1770,  under  the  title  of  Robert  Browne  and  Co., 
the  firm  had  a  wareliouse  in  London.  The  factory,  which  was  almost 
entirely  occupied  with  the  production  of  wares  of  a  utilitarian  character 
with  decoration  of  modest  pretensions,  was  closed  about  1802.  The 
name  of  one  of  the  Lowestoft  painters,  Robert  Allen,  is  inscribed  on 
a  Chinese  porcelain  tea-pot  in  the  Collection  (No.  817). 

Numerous  pieces  bearing  local  inscriptions  serve  as  aids  to  the 
identification  of  Lowestoft  productions.  Additional  evidence  was  provided 
in  igo2,  when  a  quantity  of  moulds,  wasters  and  fragments  were 
brought  to  light  on  the  premises  formerly  occupied  by  the  manufacture^. 
Li  the  earlier  stages  the  decoration  consisted  chiefly  of  painting  in 
underglaze  blue,  inspired  by  Chinese  originals  and  generally  combined 
with  scrollwork  and  floral  ornament  moulded  in  relief  in  which  the 
influence  of  early  Worcester  porcelain  is  perceptible.  Lnderglaze 
printing  in  blue"  was  also  employed.  From  about  1770  polychrome 
painting  over  the  glaze  was  adopted,  simple  sprays  of  flowers  and 
feathery  scrolls  of  rococo  character  being  the  predominant  motives. 
Inscriptions  are  also  common.  The  rococo  style  continued  in  vogue 
at  Lowestoft  longer  than  in  most  factories ;  it  was  only  towards  the 
end  of  the  i8th  century  that  the  classical  Revival  took  effect  there. 
The  "French  sprig"  pattern,  originated  in  the  Parisian  factory  of  the 
due  d'Angouleme,  is  sometimes  found  on  pieces  of  the  latest  period. 

No  recognised  factory  mark  was  used  at  Lowestoft,  but  small 
numerals  of  uncertain  significance,  always  in  underglaze  blue,  are  of 
frequent  occurrence  under  the  base  of  the  pieces. 


Xos.  797-799- 

The  following  pieces  are  decorated  with  painting  either  in  blue 
under  the  glaze  or  in  various  colours  over  it.  Gilding  occurs  on  No.  799 
only.     The  marks  in  blue  are  under  the  glaze. 


LOWESTOFT. 


159 


797.  Inkstand,  painted  in  blue,  inscribed  "A  Trifle  from  Lowt^stoft."     About  1770. 
(Plate  89.) 

Brjcly  nearly  cylindrical,  with  slightly  concave  sides,  short  narrow  nrck.  and  four  holes  for 
pens  round  the  shoulder.  The  inscription  is  enclosed  within  a  panel  of  rococo  scrollwork  ; 
on  the  reverse  side  of  the  body  are  sprays  of  con\entional  (lowers  and  two  insects. 
Round  the  shoulder  and  inside  the  mouth  are  formal  borders  in  Chinese  style.  H.  2}  in., 
diam.  3J   in. 

596.  Tea-pot  and  Covkr,  painted    in  blue  on  a    powdered  blue  ground  in  imitation 
of  Chinese  porcelain.     About  1765.     (Plate  89.) 

Globular  body,  w-ith  short  wide  neck,  curved  spout  and  loop  handle  ;  slightly  conve.\  cover  with 
cone-.shaped  knob  restored  in  plaster.  The  whole  surface  is  covered  with  powdered  blue, 
with  exception  of  a  large  shaped  panel  on  either  side  of  the  body  and  two  smaller  ones 
on  the  cover,  reserved  in  white,  which  are  painted  with  Chinese  flowering  plants  and  insects. 
H.  5}  in.,  diam.  4I  in. 

This  piece  is  similar  in  character  to  the  dish  in  the  British  Museum  painted  with  a  view  of 
Lowestoft  Church  ;  compare  Hobson.  Catalogue,  pi.  37. 

497.  Two    Salce-bo.\ts,    moulded    in    relief    and    painted    in    black ;    inside    on    the 
bottom  of  each  are  the  name  "Miss  de  V'aux"  and  date  1774. 

I^ong  spout,  shaped  rim,  loop  handle,  the  sides  moulded  with  shaped  panels.  Under  the  lip 
and  in  one  panel  are  sprays  of  (lowers  ;  the  other  panel  encloses  a  Chinese  landscape. 
Inside  the  rim  are  sprays  of  (lowers  and  compartments  of  trcUis-pattern.  H.  ij  in., 
i|  in.  respectively,  I,.  4}  in.,  W.  i?  in.,   ij  in.  respectivelv. 

531.  PAiii  OF  Trays,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  greyish-blue.     About   1765. 

In  the  form  of  a  leaf  on  which  are  moulded  a  smaller  leaf,  a  spray  of  (lowers,  and  an 
insect.  The  oiitlines  of  both  leaves  and  the  veins  of  the  smaller  are  picked  out  in  blue. 
W.  5I  in.,  46  in.  respectively. 

The  attribution  of  these  pieces  to  Lowestoft  is  uncertain. 

129.  Two  Tf.a-cups  and  Saucers,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  blue.      Mark   on 

the  cups,  I  in  blue.     About  1760.     (Plate  89.) 

Both  cups  and  saucers  are  moulded  with  sprays  of  conventional  roses  and  carnations  below 
a  narrow  band  of  scrolls,  which  is  enclosed  by  a  formal  border  painted  in  blue.  The 
cups  have  no  handle.  Cups,  H.  ij  in.,  diam.  3  in.;  saucers,  diam.  4J  in.,  4J  in. 
respectively. 

Made  from  moulds  of  the  same  pattern  as  one  found  in  the  old  buildings  of  the  Lowestoft 
factory  in  1902,  figured  by  Spelman,  pi.  iv.  The  painted  border  occurs  on  a  fragment 
found  on  the  same  site,  figured  in  the  same  work,  pi.  lili. 

130.  Tea-cup   and   Saucer,   moulded    in   relief    and    painted    in   blue.      The   initials 

"  l.H."  and  date  1764  are  introduced  in  the  moulded  decoration.     (Plate  89.) 

Both  pieces  are  moulded  with  three  vertical  or  radial  bands  of  trellis-pattern  dividing  the 
surface,  below  a  narrow  border  of  painted  ornament  of  the  same  pattern  as  that  on 
No.  129,  into  three  compartments,  each  of  which  encloses  a  circular  medallion  with 
beaded  border  surrounded  by  conventional  floral  ornament  also  in  relief.  In  each 
medallion  is  a  small  Chinese  landscape  painted  in  blue;  on  the  bottom  of  the  cup 
inside  and  in  the  middle  of  the  saucer  is  a  floral  spray  similarly  executed.  Cup,  H.  i?  in., 
diam.  3  in.;  saucer,  diam.  4^]  in. 

The  mould  for  a  tea-pot  with  similar  relief  decoration  and  the  date  1761,  a  cast  from  which 
is  in  the  British  Museum,  was  found  in  the  old  buildings  in  1902  ;  see  The  Connoisseur, 
vol.  v.,  1903,  p.  269.     For  the  border  compare  Spelman,  pi.  liii. 


i6o  LOWESTOFT. 

123.  Toy  TEA-sERVicii,  consisting  of  tea-pot  and  rover,  sugar-basin  and  cover,  milk- 
jug,  two  tea-cups  and  saucers,  and  two  coffee-cups  and  saucers,  painted  in 
colours.     About  1780.     (Plate  8g.) 

The  Ica-pot  lias  a  globular  body,  slightly  curved  spout,  loop  handle,  and  domed  cover  with 
round  knob.  The  sugar-basin  has  a  flange  round  the  rim,  into  which  the  convex  cover 
fits.  The  jug  is  pear-shaped,  with  projecting  lip  and  loop  handle.  The  tea<ups  have 
no  handle.  All  the  pieces  are  painted  with  bouquets  and  sprays  of  llovvers  in  natural 
colours. 

'lea-pot,  H.  3j  in.,  diam.  2j  in.  ;  sugar-basin,  H.  2}  in.,  diam.  2!  in.  ;  milk-jug,  H.  j]  in., 
diam.  ij  in.;  tea-cups,  H.  i  in.,  diam.  ij  in.;  coffee-cups,  H.  2'^  in.,  diam.  li  in.; 
saucers,  diam.  3J  in. 

112.  Tea-poy,  moulded  in  relief  and  painted  in  blue.  On  one  end  are  the  words 
"  Hyson  Tia,"  and  on  the  other  the  initials  "  H.T."  Mark,  5  in  blue  (No.  75). 
About  1760.     (Plate  90.) 

Of  oblong  eight-sided  section  with  flat  top  and  short  cylindrical  neck.  The  larger  sides  arc 
painted  each  with  a  Chinese  figure  in  a  landscape,  in  a  panel  surrounded  by  flowers, 
beadwork,  and  foliage  in  relief.  Round  the  top  and  base  are  borders  of  scrolls  and 
lozenge-pattern  respectively  in  blue.  The  inscription  and  initials  on  the  ends  arc 
painted  each  on  a  slightly  raised  panel  with  a  Horal  border  in  relief.  Floral  sprays  and 
insects  in  blue  are  scattered  over  the  remaining  surfaces.     H.  45  in.,  1..  yl  '"■.  ^^  •  -j  '"• 

108.  Mug,  painted  in  blue  in  the  Chinese  stvle.  Mark,  14  in  blue.  About  1770. 
(Plate  89.) 

Cylindrical,  with  grooved  loop  handle.  The  decoration  consists  of  a  dragon,  partly  outside 
and  partly  inside  the  mug,  chasing  a  llaming  pearl  amid  conventional  clouds.  H.  j.J  in., 
diain.  4„  in. 

Bought  at  Salisbury  on  September  nth,  i86g,  see  Journals,  i.,  p.  36,  ".  .  .  .  went  on  to 
"  Targett's  in  the  High  Street  .  .  .  There  C.  S.  discovered  ....  a  clumsy  blue  and 
"  white  jug,  handle  terminating  in  a  heart.  Bow  (3s.)."  This  piece  was  formerly 
attributed  to  Bow.     A  similar  mug  io  figured  by  Spelman,  pi.  Ixxvii. 

Burton,  F.iii;Ush  Porcelain,  pi.   ii  ;   Mew,  pi.  xi. 

798.  Mug,    painted    in    colours;     inscribed    on    the    front    in    black    "A   Trillc    from 

Lowestoft."     About  1790.     (Plate  go.) 

Barrel-shaped,  with  a  band  of    reeding  round   the    rim    and   base  and  scrolled   loop   handle. 

On   either  side  is  a  spray  of   cornllowers   in  overglaze  blue,   red,  and    green  in   the   style 

of  the  so-called  Angouleme  sprigs ;  the  inscription  is  surrounded  by  garlands  of  foliage 

painted  in  crimson.     H.  3|  in.,  diam.  3  in. 
A   mug  with  the  same  inscription  and  similar    decoration   in    the  liritish  Museum   is   dated 

1795,   figured  in  The  Cemnoisseur,  Vol.  vii,  1903,  p.   100. 

799.  Mug,  decorated  with  oiKJing.     About   1790. 

Barrel-shaped,  with  a  band  of  reeding  round  the  rim  and  base,  and  loop  handle.  On  the. 
front  are  the  initials  "F.H."  within  a  heart-shaped  panel;  gilt  stars  are  regularly 
scattered  over  the  remaining  surface.     H.  4  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 


XIV.— NANTGARW. 


THE  porcelain  works  at  Nanlgarw,  between  Cardiff  and  Merthyr 
Tydfil  in  the  valley  of  the  Taff,  was  founded  in  1811  by  William 
Billingsley  (who  was  apprenticed  at  the  Derby  factory  in  1774,  and 
had  subsequently  been  employed  by  Flight  and  Barr  at  Worcester) 
and  his  son-in-law  Samuel  Walker.  The  manufacture  was  suspended 
in  1814,  when  Billingsley  and  his  staff  removed  to  the  Swansea  works. 
It  was  resumed  in  1817  and  in  1819  Billingsley  migrated  to  Coalport, 
the  Nantgarw  works  being  taken  over  by  William  Weston  Young,  who 
carried  them  on  till  they  were  finally  closed  in  1822. 

The  paste  of  Nantgarw  porcelain  is  of  very  translucent,  glassy 
character.  The  decoration  was  chiefly  imitated  from  that  of  Sevres 
porcelain  of  the  i8th  century.  .Much  of  the  porcelain  was  issued  from  the 
factory  without  decoration  and  painted  in  London  or  elsewhere.  The 
mark  used  was  the  name  "  nant-g.\rw,"  with  or  without  the  initials 
"  c  w  "  (probably  for  "  China  Works  "),  impressed. 


Nos.  804-807. 

All  these  pieces  are  painted  over  the  glaze  in  enanu;!  colours  and 
gold. 

804.  Pen-tray.     Mark,  "nant-garw  c.w.,"  impressed  (No.  82).     (Plate  91.) 

Boat-shaped;  decorated  inside  witli  a  border  of  pendent  rose-sprays  alternating  with  stems 
bearing  red  berries  intertwined  with  gilt  scrolls,  and  outside  with  detached  roses  and 
buds.     The  flowers  are  painted  in  natural  colours.     I..  9.5  in.,  W.  3  in. 

805.  Pair  of  Goblets.     Mark  on  both,  "G"  impressed  (No.  83).     (Plate  91.) 

Semi-ovoid  bowl,  high  spreading  foot.  The  surface  of  the  bowl  is  divided  by  pendent 
laurel-sprays  in  gold,  each  flanked  by  two  vertical  wavy  gilt  lines,  into  four  panels,  in 
each  of  which  is  a  spray  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  Round  the  rim  is  a  border  of 
gilt  foliage  on  a  wavy  stem.  The  flowers  are,  on  one  goblet,  pink  roses,  yellow  and 
red  tulips  with  forget-me-nots,  purple  anemones,  and  blue  and  yellow  convolvulus;  on 
the  other,  pink  roses,  blue  and  yellow  convolvulus,  yellow  anemones,  and  purple  poppy 
Each,  H.  jj  in.  diam.  5  in. 
.\     1  '.I2.iy  L 


i62  NANTGARW. 

806.  Plate.     Mark,  "nant-gakw  c.w.,"  impressed.     (Plate  91.) 

In  the  micUUo  is  a  bouquet  of  flowers  in  natural  colours.  On  the  rim  arc  four  panels  reserved 
in  white  and  surrounded  by  gilt  scrolls  flanked  by  floral  sprays  on  a  blue  ground;  in 
two  of  the  panels  are  Chinese  figures,  in  the  others  miniature  Chinese  pavilions  among 
trees.     Diam.  gj-  in. 

This  piece  was  decorated  elsewhere  than  at  Nantgarw,  probably  in  London  by  one  of  the 
enamellers  employed  by  the  dealer  John  .Mortlock. 

807.  Pi. ATI;.     Mark,  "  nant-garw  c.w."  impressed.     (Plate  91.) 

The  rim  has  a  shaped  edge  and  is  moulded  in  relief  with  gilt  scrollwork  and  wreaths  of 
(lowers  forming  panels  which  are  painted  with  bouquets  in  natural  colours  against  a 
shaded  grev  background.  In  the  middle  is  a  large  group  of  currants,  cherries,  plums 
and  an  apple,  with  foliage,  in  natural  colours.     Diam.  qg  in. 

From  the  style  of  painting  it  is  probable  that  this  plate  was  painted  by  Moses  Webster,  who 
decorated  Nantgarw  porcelain  in  London  for  Mortlock,  the  ware  being  fired  by  Kobins 
and  Randall  at  Spa  Fields,  Clerkenwell;  compare  Turner,  p.  207,  and  pi.  xxvii.  and  x.\xi. 


XV.— SWANSEA. 


THE  "Cambrian  Pottery"  at  Swansea  was  established  in  1764. 
Porcelain  was  not  made  there  until  181 4,  when  Lewis  Weston 
DJlIwyn  was  chief  proprietor  of  the  pottery.  In  that  year  Dillwyn 
visited  the  porcelain  factory  recently  established  at  Nantgarw'  and 
induced  its  managers.  Billingsley  and  Walker,  to  transfer  their  manu- 
facture to  his  own  works.  Billingsley  and  Walker  left  Swansea  again 
in  1817  ;  at  the  same  time  Dillwyn  disposed  of  his  shares  in  the  firm, 
which  became  Bevington  &  Co.  The  manufacture  of  porcelain  ceased 
in  1823  or  1824. 

The  porcelain  made  at  Swansea  was  of  three  distinct  types  of  paste. 
The  first,  made  from  the  receipt  of  Billingsley,  resembled  that  of  Nant- 
garw porcelain  ;  the  second,  from  the  receipt  of  Dillwyn,  showing  the 
greenish  hue  of  a  duck's  egg  by  transmitted  light,  was,  like  the  first,  not 
made  after  1818  ;  the  third,  made  after  that  date,  was  of  a  dead  white 
appearance.  Both  the  pieces  described  below  are  of  the  second  type. 
The  marks  used  were  the  name  "  Swansea  "  written  in  red  script  or 
impressed  in  capitals,  and  on  the  later  productions  the  name  of  the 
firm  impressed ;  an  impressed  trident  is  sometimes  found  on  porcelain 
from  Dillwyn's  receipt,  made  from  about  1816  to  1818.  On  Billingsley 's 
porcelain  the  Nantgarw  stamp  appears  to  have  been  used. 

Nos.  808-809. 
ttoth  these  pieces  arc  painted  in  colours  over  the  glaze  and  gilt. 

808.  Pi.ATK.     Mark,  "  Swansea"  and  a  trident,  impressed  (No.  84).     (Plate  91.) 

Painted  in  natural  colours  with  three  groups  of  pink  roses  and  butterflies  between  them. 
The  rim  is  lobed  and  has  a  border  of  beads  in  relief  between  two  gilt  lines.  Diam 
8.;  in. 

809.  Pi..\TE.     Mark,  "  Sivansea,"  written  in  red  (No.  85).     (Plate  91.) 

In  the  middle  is  a  painting  in  colours  after  nature  of  a  bird,  the  name  of  which,  "Sicallotc 
of  Otaheite,"  is  written  in  red  on  the  back  of  the  plate.  The  rim  is  decorated  with  a 
narrow  border  of  gilt  scrolls.     Diam.  8J  in. 

Kormerly  in  the  collection  of  Lewis  Mewelyn  Dillwyn,  M.P. 

'  Compare  p.   161. 


XVI.— COALPORT. 


T  OHN  ROSE,  an  apprentice  of  Turner  of  Caughley,  set  up  a  pottery 
I  about  1780  at  Jackfield  in  the  same  neighbourhood;  shortly  after- 
wards he  removed  it  to  Coalport,  on  the  bank  of  the  Severn  nearly 
opposite  to  Caughley,  and  in  1799  he  bought  up  the  Caughley  factory  and 
for  a  few  years  manufactured  porcelain  at  both  factories  concurrently, 
until,  about  1814,  the  elder  establishment  was  finally  abandoned.  The 
Nantgarw  and  Swansea  works  were  successively  absorbed  by  the  Coal- 
port  hrm,  which  is  still  in  existence. 

The  marks  used  in  the  early  part  of  the  19th  century  were  the  "  C  "^ 
and  "  S  "  of  Caughley,  and  the  name  "  Coalport  "  or  the  initials  "  C  B  D  " 
(for  Coalbrookdale,  another  name  by  which  the  factory  was  known), 
painted  under  or  over  the  glaze.  The  majority  of  early  Coalport 
porcelain  is  unmarked. 

No.  810. 

810.  Pair  of  Dishes,  filled,  one  with  walnuts,  the  other  with  green  peas  in  their  shells 
and  pease-blossom  amongst  them,  modelled  in  porcelain  and  painted  in  colours 
after  nature.     About  1820. 

The  dishes  are  circular,  with  a  gilt  openwurk  border  and  four  small  s-creilled  feet.     II.  3  in., 
2|  in.,  diam.  7I  in.,  7J  in.  respectively. 


X\II.— ENGLISH    PORCEL.AIN   OF   UNCKRT.MX   ORIGIX. 

No.  792. 

792.    |i  i^,  painted  in  colours  over  the  glaze  and  gilt.     The  name  and  date   "Richard 
Street  1792"  are  incised  on  the  bottom  (Mark  No.  76).     (Plate  90.) 

Inverted  pear-shaped  bodv,  cylindrical  neck  with  projecting  lip,  scrolled  and  foliated  loop 
handle  On  either  sid'e  of  the  body  are  landscapes,  each  in  an  oval  panel  with  a  formal 
gilt  border.  That  on  one  side  d'epicts  a  distant  view  of  a  town  with  a  river  in  the 
foreground  ;  the  other  appears  to  be  adapted  from  a  view  in  Dovedale,  near  .Vshbourne, 
with  two  persons  walking  in  the  foreground.  Below  the  tip  is  a  gilt  rose-bud.  H.  4^  in., 
diam.  3J  in. 

The  style  of  ]jainting  appears  to  be  an  imitation  of  that  of  Zachariah  Boreman  of  Derby 
(compare  No.  471),  and  it  is  probable  that  this  jug  was  made  in  one  of  the  minor 
factories  of  the  Midland  counties. 


XMII. -CHINESE    PORCELALN   DECORATED    IN   EXGLAXD. 


DCRING  the  i8th  century  and  later  Chinese  porcelain  was  not 
only  decorated  in  China  after  English  and  Continental  patterns, 
but  it  was  imported  in  considerable  quantities  in  the  white 
nito  this  country,  where  it  was  painted  and  gilt,  sometimes  in  the 
English  porcelain  factories,  but  more  often  in  the  smaller  establishments 
in  London  and  elsewhere  of  enamellers  who  decorated  white  porcelain 
of  various  manufactures,  English  as  well  as  foreign.  The  dates  assigned 
to  the  pieces  described  below  are  those  at  which  the  decoration \-as 
executed ;  in  all  cases  the  porcelain  appears  to  be  nearly  contemporary 
with  the  decoration.  A  Chinese  tea-pot  (No.  Si 7),  the  lid  of  which 
only  is  decorated  in  England,  is  described  under  another  heading  (XX.). 

§  I.  DECORATED  AT  BOW. 

No.  8 1 6a. 

816a.  Tea-cup,  CoFFEE-cur,  and  Saucer,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt  On  each 
piece  IS  a  shield  with  the  arms  of  Hayes,  of  London,  accompanied  by  the 
crest.     About   lyCo. 

The  shield  of  rococo  scrolled  form,  charged  crminois  three  wolves'  heads  erased  sable 
langued  gules,  is  placed  on  the  front  of  the  coffee-cup,  on  one  side  of  the  tea-cup  which 
has  no  handle,  and  m  the  middle  of  the  saucer.  The  crest,  a  wolf  erminois.  surmounts 
the  shield  on  the  coffee-cup  and  saucer ;  on  the  tea-cup  it  is  separated  from  the  shield 
and  placed  on  the  reverse  side.  Coffee-cup,  H.  2^  in.,  diam.  2'  in. ;  tea-cup  H  i'-  in 
diara.  2j  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  4I  in.  i-i      •     v  .n.. 

Other  pieces  from  the  same  set  are  in  the  British  Museum,  see  Hobson,  Catalogue,  p.  21. 

§  2.  DECORATED  AT  CHELSEA. 

Nos.  811,  etc. 

811.  Mug,  decorated  in  China  witli  painting  under  the  glaze  in  h\uo  and  over  it  in 

white  slip,  and  at  Chelsea  with  polvchrome  painting  and  gilding      The  ed^-c 

is  mounted  with  a  metal  rim.     About  1760.  ° 

Inverted  bell-shaped  body,  high  foot,  loop  handle  finished  at  the  lower  end  in  the  form  of  •> 

small    joo-i   sceptre-head.      The  original   decoration   consisted    of    bamboos    and    prunu'-, 

branches   growing   on    rocks,  in  slight  relief   in  white  slip,  between   borders   in    blue   of 

cell-pattern  round  the  rim  and  wavy  ornament  round  the  lower  part  of  the  body      Over  th>- 

slip  decoration  has  been  added  a  group  of   five  e.xotic  birds  amongst  bushes.painted  in 

brilli.int  colours.     The  foot  and  handle  are  gilt.     H.  j3  in     diam    4'   in        ■  1  ■"""="  '" 

llie  enamelled  decoration  is  by  the  same  hand  as  that  of  the  Chelsea  jilatc    .\o    Sii 


i66  CHINESE. 

1 812,  813.  Tea-pots,  decorated  at  ^^'orcestel■,  sec  below.] 

[814,  815.   Cups  and  Saucers,  decorated  at  Worcester,  see  below.] 

399a.  Saucer,  painted  in  crimson  and  brown. 

Painted  in  monochrome  in  crimson  with  a  landscape  in  which  are  throe  travellers  resting 
beside  a  stream,  with  buildings  beyond.  Fluted  rim,  with  scalloped  edge  painted  with 
a  brown  line.     Diam.  4J  in. 

Decorated  by  the  same  hand  as  a  Chelsea  bowl  and  cup  (N'os.  376,  399)  in  the  Collection, 
and  a  cup  and  saucer  in  the  Museum  (No.  3241-1853.) 

816.  Teacup  and  Saucer,  "egg-shell"  porcelain,  decorated  with  painting  in  crimson 
and  black  and  gilt.     About  1755. 

On  one  side  of  the  cup,  which  has  no  handle,  is  a  river-scene  with  buildings  and  a  wherry  ; 
in  tlie  middle  of  the  saucer  is  also  a  landscape  with  two  men  walking  near  a  large 
group  of  trees.  Both  landscapes  are  painted  in  monochrome  in  crimson,  and  are  enclosed 
within  a  panel  bordered  with  rococo  scrollwork  in  black  and  gold.  On  the  reverse  side 
of  the  cup  and  inside  on  the  bottom  of  it  is  a  figure  of  a  lady  wearing  a  large  hooped 
skirt,  also  in  crimson.     Cup,  H.  li  in.;  diam.  2I  in.  ;  saucer,  diam.  4J  in. 


§  3.  DECORATED  AT   WORCESTER. 

Nos.  812-815. 

The  decoration  in  each  case  is   in  enamel  colours  over  the  glaze  ; 
gilding  is  also  added  on  all  the  pieces  except  No.  815. 

812.  Tea-pot  and  Cover.     About  1760. 

Globular  body,  straight  spout,  loop  handle,  slightly  domed  cover  with  gilt  cone-shaped  knob ; 

the  stand  hexagonal  with  wavy  sloping  rim.     Ml  three  pieces  are  painted  with  bouquets 

or  sprays  of  flowers,  butterflies,  and  caterpillars  in  natural  colours.     Tea-pot,  H.  y}  in., 

diam.  4!  in. ;  stand,  diam.  jj  in. 
These  pieces  appear  to  be  painted  by  the  same  hand  as  Nos.  813  and  815,  and  the  Worcester 

pieces  Nos.  39,  591,  and  787. 

813.  Tea-pot  and  Cover.     About  1760.     (Plate  92.) 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  812.  On  either  side  of  the  body  and  on  the  cover  are  sprays  of 
flowers  and  a  butterfly  in  natural  colours  in  a  quatrefoil-shaped  panel  edged  with 
a  purple  line  and  reserved  in  white  on  a  primrose-yellow  ground.  H.  5|  in., 
diam.  45  in. 

Compare  note  on  No.  812. 

814.  Two  Tea-cups  and  Saucers,  "egg-shell"  porcelain.     About  1760. 

The  saucers  and  the  outside  of  the  cups  are  painted  with  different  groups  of  exotic  birds 
amongst  bushes  in  brilliant  colours ;  inside  each  cup  is  a  spray  of  flowers.  The  cups 
have  no  handles.     Cups,  H.   1}  in.,  diam.  2|   in.  ;  saucers,  diam.  4^  in.,  4^  in.  respectively. 

815.  Tea-cup  and  S.\ucer.     About  1760. 

Both   pieces  are  painted  with   sprays    of    flowers    and    a    butterfly,  in    natural    colours.     The 

cup  has  no  handle.     Cup,  H.  i\   in.,   diam.  35   in.;  saucer,  diam.  4?  in. 
Compare  note  on  No.  812. 


XIX.— GERMAN   (MEISSEN)   PORCELAIN    DECORATED 
IN  ENGLAND. 

Nos.   loi,  &c. 

The  three  following  pieces  were  made  at  the  Royal  Saxon  Porcelain 
Manufactory  at  Meissen,  near  Dresden,  about  1740.  The  polyclirome 
enamelled  decoration  was  added  over  the  glaze  in  England  during  the 
following  decade.  The  decoration  in  the  style  of  the  early  Chinese  famille 
rose  on  Nos.  loi  and  116  shows  some  resemblance  to  that  of  the  "New 
Canton  "  inkstands  made  at  Bow  in  1750.^  Certain  pieces  of  Stafford- 
shire salt-glazed  stoneware-  are  enamelled  in  very  similar  style,  whilst 
others  with  figure  decoration  are  analogous  with  No.  102.  It  is  pro- 
bable that  all  these  pieces  were  decorated  in  London,  by  an  enameller 
such  as  Giles  of  Kentish  Town.  Except  on  No.  loi,  the  decoration  is 
enriched  with  gilding. 

101.  Chocoi,atf,-pot    and    Cover,    ])ainted  in  iiuitation  of  Chinese  jiorcelain    of    tlio 

lainille  rose.     (Plate  92.) 

Pear-shaped  body,  scrolled  loop  handle,  projecting  lip,  slightly  domed  cover  with  shaped 
knob.  Painted  with  sprays  of  flowers  in  a  vase  which  stands  beside  a  railing,  repeated 
on  either  side  of  the  body  and  in  miniature  on  the  cover.     H.  5  in.,  diam.  3J  in. 

A  similar  piece  is  figured  in  a  Sale  Catalogue,  Antiquitdten  aus  dem  Besitz  des  Kunsthandlers 
Albert  Salomon,   Berlin,    1913,  pi.    11,    No.   186. 

102.  Coffee-pot  and  Co\'er.     (Plate  92.) 

Pear-shaped  body,  scrolled  loop  handle,  projecting  lip,  domed  cover  with  shaped  knob.  The 
same  figure-subject  in  colours  is  repeated  on  cither  side  of  the  body  and  in  miniature 
on  the  cover.  It  depicts  a  shepherd  seated  near  a  stream  beside  a  girl  who  is  spinning 
wool  from  a  distaff.  Both  are  dressed  in  costume  of  the  period.  A  dog  lies  at  their 
feet,  whilst  a  tree,  a  windmill,  ruined  buildings  and  groups  of  sheep  are  introduced  as 
accessories.     H.  6|  in.,  diam.  3I  in. 

The  shape  is  that  of  three  Meissen  coffee-pots  in  the  Museum,  Nos.  1956-1855,  1957-1855, 
and  C.  52-1909. 

116.  Tea-pot    and  Cover,  painted  in   the   style  of    Chinese    porcelain    of   the  fuinillf 
rose. 

Xeariy  ovoid  body  painted  nn  cither  side  with  a  phoenix,  waterfowl,  flowering  plants  on 
rocks  and  a  butterfly  ;  the  cover  is  similarly  painted  and  has  a  round  knolj.  The  rim 
of  the  pot  is  decorated  with  a  floral  border.  Curved  spout  of  octagonal  section,  loop 
handle  projecting  to  a  point.  The  cover  is  attached  by  a  silver  chain  to  the  handle, 
and   the  spout  has  been  restored   in  silver.     H.  3;]   in.,   diam.  3   in. 

A  sauce-boat,  a  plate,  a  jug  and  a  Ijottle  and  basin  (Nos.  893,  922,  931  and  953)  in  the 
Schreiber  Collection  and  a  mug  in  the  Museum  (No.  24-1885)  are  pieces  of  Staffordshire 
salt-glazed  ware  evidently  painted  by  the  same  enameller. 


Sec  p.  4.  -  F.^iJt(  ially  those  cited  in  the  note  to  No.  116. 


XX.— CHINESE    PORCELAIN. 

Nos.  817,  etc. 

817.  Tea-pot  and  Cover,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.  On  either  side  is  the  subject 
of  the  Crucifixion,  copied  from  a  European  engraving.  The  name  "Allen 
Loivustojt  "   is  inscribed  in  red  enamel  on   the  bottom.     About  1760. 

Of  the  same  form  as  No.  812.  In  the  Crucifixion  scene  numerous  figures  appear  groujjed 
round  the  three  crosses;  in  the  foreground  are  Roman  soldiers  casting  lots  for  the 
garments  of  our  Lord.  The  cover  is  painted  with  two  floral  sprays,  the  knob  and 
flange  being  gilt.     H.  5  in.,  diam.  4j  in.  n   u         »>i  t    , 

From  the  inscription  it  may  be  concluded  this  tea-pot  belonged  to  Hobert  Allen,  of  the 
Lowestoft  porcelain  works,  who  put  his  name  upon  it  and  probably  painted  the  sprays 
on  the  cover,  which  were  certainly  not  e.xecuted  in  China.  It  has  been  suggested  that 
Allen  also  painted  the  Crucifixion  groups,  reference  being  made  in  support  of  this  to 
the  east  window  of  the  parish  church  at  Lowestoft,  which  was  painted  by  him  in  1819 
with  the  same  subject.  This  suggestion  is,  however,  untenable.  The  tea-pot  belongs  to 
the  numerous  class  of  objects  decorated  in  China  by  native  enamellers  with  religious 
and  other  subjects  copied  from  European  prints. 

Allen  was  born  in  17^4  and  died  in  1835.  He  entered  the  Lowestoft  factory  as  painter 
in  I7j7,  and  about  1780  became  manager  of  it.  .\fter  it  was  closed  he  carried  on  an 
enamelling  workshop  in  the  town  in  which  he  decorated  wares  of  various  kinds.  Compare 
p.  158  above;  also  Chaffers,  Marks  and  Monngrams,  p.  853;  Spelman,  p.  76:  Church, 
p.  9,  ;  Bushell,  Chinese  Art,  ii.,  p.  40. 

Burton,   English  Porcelain,  fig.  71. 

45.  Pair  or  Vases,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     .'Xbout   1740. 

Of  hexagonal  section,  the  upper  part  of  the  body  swelling  outwards  and  decorated  with 
vine-stems  with  tendrils,  leaves  and  grapes  and,  amongst  them,  two  squirrels,  all  applied 
in  relief  and  coloured  after  nature.  The  lower  part  is  decorated  with  gilt-centred  con- 
ventional flowers  and  foliage  reserved  in  white  on  a  coral-red  ground.  Short  flaring 
neck,  spreading  base.     Each,  H.  5|  in.,  diam.  2  in.  ■     ,    ,  1  • 

These  vases  belong  to  the  class  of  so-called  "  soft  paste  "  porcelain,  characterised  by  a  _  thin 
glaze  with  a  surface  resembling  orange-peel,  known  by  Chinese  collectors  as  I-cn  Img. 
Compare  Bushell,  Oriental  Ceramic  Art,  p.  320,  Chinese  Art,  ii.,  pp.  25,  31. 

725c.  Coffee-cup,  painted  in  colours  and  gilt.     About   1760. 

The  shape  and  decoration  are  the  same  as  those  of  tlie  Plymouth  colTeo-cups  Nos.  7250  and  h, 
for  which  this  piece  served  as  a  pattern.     H.  2;  in.,  diam.  2,''j  in. 


XXL— FRENCH    (SEVRES)   PORCELAIN. 


The  Sclireiber  Collection  includes  two  examples  of  the  French 
soft  paste  porcelain  made  at  the  Manufacture  Royale  de  Porcelaine 
at  Sevres,  a  pair  of  groups  in  biscuit  porcelain  from  models  which 
were  imitated  in  Enj^land  at  the  Chelsea  and  Derby  factories. 


No.  428. 

428.  Pair  of  Groups  of  Children  in  biscuit  i)orcplain,  known  respectively  ns 
■'  La  Lanlevne  Magiqiie"  or  "  La  CUiriasite"  and  "  Lc  Tourniquet  "  or  "  La  Lotcrie." 
Made  in  1757  or  shortly  afterwards  from  models  executed  in  that  year  by 
Etienne  Falconet  (b.  1716,  d.  1791)  in  adaptation  of  two  groups  in  an 
engraving  by  Charles  Nicolas  Cochin  fils,  entitled  "  Foire  Je  Campagiic,"  after  a 
painting  by  Frangois   Boucher. 

The  first  group  represents  children  with  a  peep-show.  A  boy  acting  as  showman  stands  on 
one  side  of  the  peep-show  ;  a  girl  holding  a  basket  of  bread  leans  forward  to  look 
into  it,  whilst  a  little   boy  peers  over  her  shoulders  from   behind.     H.  6^    in.,   \V.    6\    in. 

In  the  second  group  two  boys  and  a  girl  are  gathered  round  a  fortune-telling  machine,  watch- 
ing the  pointer  ;  a  dog  crouches  at  the  feot  of  one  of  the  boys,  who  is  working  the 
machine,  and  a  basket  of  fruit  rests  on  the  ground  behind  the  girl.     H.  6j  in.,  W.  ()j  in. 

Models  of  this  pair  of  groups,  dated  1760,  in  the  collection  of  the  Manufacture  Nationale  at 
S&vres,  are  figured  by  Troudc,  Choix  de  Modeles,  pi.  24  ;  compare  also  15ourgeois,  Biscuit 
de  Sevres,  i.,  p.  46,  ii.,  p.  7.  The  full  titles  are  "  La  Lanterne  Magiqiie  montrce  a  la 
Foire  par  le  Savoyard  "  and  "  Le  Tourniijuet  preseiite  a  la  Foire  par  le  Marchand  de  Plaisirs." 
Groups  made  in  imitation  at  Chelsea  are  referred  to  in  the  catalogue  of  "  Part  of  the 
Remaining  Stock  of  the  Chelsea  Porcelane  Manufactory,"  sold  by  Messrs.  Christie  and 
.\nsell  on  February  i8lh,  1778,  as  "One  group  of  a  galantec-show,  and  one  ditto 
playing  at  hazard,  in  biscuit ;  "  see  Nightingale,  p.  50.  The  same  groups  appear 
under  Xos.  93  and  94  in  the  price-list  of  the  Derby  factory  as  "  Group  of  three  Figures 
playing  at  Hazard"  and  "Group  of  three  Figures  at  a  Raree  Show";  see  Hasleni, 
p.  1 7 J.  An  impression  of  the  engraving  from  which  the  subjects  are  taken  accompanies 
the  Collection,  No.  1821. 


INDEX. 

References  to  the  calaloL^ue  numbers  0/  the  objects  are  printed  thus:    15;  references  to 
pages  thus  :    15. 

"  Acceptance,"  group,  420. 

Ace  of  Clubs,  258. 

Acier,  Michel  \'ictor,  modeller,  427a. 

Actors,  figures,  2,  3,  135,  135a,  136,  185,  186,  196,  204,  205,  676. 

Adonis  and  Venus,  728. 

Aeneas  and  Anchises,  print,  71. 

Aesculapius,  figure,  418. 

Aesop's  Fables,  255,  352,  356,  384,  385,   387,  406. 

Affenkapelle,  figures,   172. 

Agate  intaglio,  312. 

Ages  of  Man,  Four,  prints,  786. 

Agreable  Lefon,  L',  engraving,   192. 

A'ir,  figure,  731. 

Allemande,  La  Danse,  group,  415. 

"Allen  Lowestoft,"  inscription,  817. 

Allen,  Robert,  painter,  817,  158- 

America,  figures,  8,  202,  684. 

Amiens,  peace  of,  790. 

Amour,  L\  print,   131,  607,  611,  623,  628,  667. 

Amsterdam,  objects  acquired  at,  26,  3i,  95,  252,  313,  315,  408,  420,  483,  558. 

Anchor  mark,  29,  153;  blue,  341,  349;  gold,  192-196,  202,  246,  251,  336,  337, 
347.  348,  362,  389  398,  438;  red,  167,  171-174,  208,  218  220,  237,  244,  328, 
338  340,  351,  361,  368,  369,  372,  373,  379,  384,  399,  400;  relief,  138,  144, 
150,    153,    167,  206,  210217,  236,  245,  334,  335,  375,  381-388. 

Anchor  and  dagger,  mark,  3,   13,  48,  62,  66,  67,  368,6. 

Angouleme,  due  d",  463,  538,  798,   158- 

Antwerp,  figures  bought  at,    176. 

Apple-green,  527,  528,  582,  582a,  82. 

Argyle,  Duke  of,  garden  of,  561. 

Arita  porcelain,  30. 

Arithmetic,  group,  427a. 

Artemis,  statue,  684. 

ylrfisi's  Vade-Meciim,  The,  500,  541,  561,  568,  2. 

Arran,  arms,  523. 

Ashburton,  Lord,  collection,  729. 

Ashbourne,  view  near,  792. 

Asia,  figures,   184,  685. 

Askew,  painter,  472,  77- 

Astronomy,  figures,   173,  411,  472. 

Augustus 'the  Strong,  King  of  Poland,  26. 


INDEX.  171 

Aultmann,  dealer,  327. 

Autumn,  figures,  23,    183,    193,  680,  681,  687,  688,   729,   730;  groups,    180,   417. 

Avon,  near  Fontainebleau,   138. 

B,  mark,  20,  421,  424,  492;  S3,    134. 

Bacon,  John,  sculptor,  20,  205 ;  5. 

Bacchus,  figure,   180. 

Bacchus,  Le  Bosquet  de,  engraving,  59. 

Bagpipe-player,  figures,   10,  41. 

Bajazzo,  figure,  21. 

Bandinel  Collection,  349. 

Barnes,  Zachariah,  potter,   151. 

Barr,  Martin,  of  Worcester,  492,  2,  81,  83,  161. 

Battersea,  enamel,   113,     177,    270,    271,    273-277,    290,    294,    488;     Hancock   at,  G, 

81  ;  porcelain  printed  at,   131. 
Beanflower  scent-bottle,  303. 
Bell  and  Black's  match- factory,    132,    132a. 
Bell-pull,  473. 
Bellona,  figure,    190. 
Bentley,  Richard,  65. 
Beygere  des  Alpes,  La,  grou[i,  420. 
Ber'tol,  dealer,  731. 
Betew,  Panton,  dealer,  304. 
Bevington  &  Co.,  of  Swansea,   163. 
Billingslev,  William,  potter,   161,   i6j. 
Biscuit  porcelain,  413,  419,  428,  429,  739,  65,   134. 
Bishop,  figure,  24. 
Blanc  dc  Chine,  6. 

Blemont,  Barthelemy  de,  potter,   138. 
Blenheim  Collection,  409. 
Bleu  de  voi,   284,  435,  438,  443,    445,    446,  467,  469,  476,  516,  574,  579,  586,   594, 

602,  605,  613,  631,  633,  636,  642,  644,  656,  657,  65. 
"  Blind  Earl's  j)attern,"   527,  528,  529,  587. 
Block,  dealer,  a. 
Bloor,  Robert,  of  Derbv,  76,  77. 
Blue,  mazarine,    241,   250,   251,   254,    257,    264,   283,   343,    347,  31,   65;   powder,  601, 

604,  651,  658;  scale-pattern,  478,  589,  650,  652,  661  ;  see  also   bleu  de  roi. 
Boasberg,  dealer,  95,  315. 
Bonhonnicves,  269-274,  276,  493. 

Bone,  Henry,  enameller,  726,   727,   753,   768,   770,   777,    134. 
Bone  ash,  2,  4. 

Bordeaux,  cups  bought  at,  646. 
Boreman,  Zachariah,  painter,  471,  792,  77. 
Boscawen,  Admiral,  portrait,  554. 
Bosquet  de  Bacchus,  Le,  engraving,  59. 
Boucher,  Frangois,  painter,    171,    192,  420,  423,  428,  65. 
Bow,  factory,  35,  40,  52,  58,  88,  684,    1,   3,  4,  29,  76,83,  134,  167;    ijorcelain,   1165; 

Chinese  porcelain  decorated  at,  816a,   165. 


172  INDEX. 

Bowcocke,  Jcihii,    12,   20,   22,  6Q,    198,  330,  vii,  4. 

Boydell,  J.,  publisher,  672. 

"  Brameld,"  mark,  794   796. 

Tkameld  t'v:  Co.,  potters,   15(1. 

Breloques,  307-310. 

Briand,  Tliomas,  modeller,  739. 

Brimstree,  hundred  of,  790. 

Bristol,  factories    at,    2,  3,  83,    123,    133;     porcelain,    87,     110,    496,    503,    684,    726, 

728-780;  statue  at,    134. 
"  Bristoll,"  mark,  87,   134. 
Britain,  John,  of  Bristol,    110,   720. 
Britannia,  figure,  4  ;  print,  555. 
British  Museum,  68,  242,  452,  516a,  4,  31. 
Brittan,  Francis,   110. 
Brittan,  John,  133. 
Broseley,   149. 

Browne,  Robert,  of  Lowestoft,   15S. 
Brownhills,  factory,   iig. 

Brunswick,  Prince  Ferdinand  of,  portrait,  785. 

Brussels,  exhibition,   110,  133;  objects  acquired  at,   182,  203,  330,  421. 
Bryant  and  May's  match  factory,    132,   132a,  vii. 
Buckenham,  sale  at,  729. 
Pnickles,  shoe,  442. 
Burke,  Edmund,  780. 
Burslem,  119,  153. 
Busiri,  designer,  672. 
Butti,  dealer,   134. 
Button,  dealer,  342,  523. 

C,  mark,   149,  164. 

Caillot,  dealer,   174. 

Cambrian  pottery,   163. 

Canary-yellow,  54O,  576,  585,  660,  675. 

Cane  handles,  304,  305. 

Canton,  New,  357,  4,   167. 

"  Card  toilette  bottles,"  258. 

Cardiff,  161. 

Carlyle,  Thomas,  488. 

Cars,  Laurent,  engraver,   139,  561. 

Carter,  dealer,  684. 

Cascade,  La,  engraving,  789. 

Castor,  Temple  of,  Rome,  498,  499a. 

Castle  Green,  Bristol,   123,   133. 

Caughley,  factory,   i,   149,   154,   164;  porcelain,  781    783,  790. 

C.B.D.,  mark,   164. 

Cerberus,  figure,   142. 

Chaffers,  Richard,  potter,  151. 

Chamberlain,  Humphrey,  painter,  516a;  Robert,  potter,  81,  83. 

"Chamberlains  Worcester,"  mark,  516a,  675,  83. 


INDEX.  173 

Champion,  Richard,  potter,  726,  730,  731,  739,   133,   134;  Sarah,  739. 

Chapin,  dealer,  401. 

Charity,  group,   181. 

Charlotte,  Queen,  porcelain  made  for,  254,  347,  31  ;  portrait,  492. 

Charta,  Magna,  201. 

Chatham,  Earl  of,  figure,  202,  31  ;  portrait,  556. 

Chelsea,  Church,  view  of,  348;  factory,  1-3,29,  65,  S2,  168;  model,  426 ;  porcelain, 
133-408,  438,  731,  6;  Chinese  porcelain  decorated  at,  811,  816,  165; 
^^'edgwood's  workroom  at,  65. 

"Chelsea  1745,"  mark,   157. 

Chelsea-Derby  porcelain,  327,  404,  409  458,  588,  65,   134;   trinkets,  327. 

Chetham,  arms,  523. 

China-clay,  2,  123. 

Chinamen,  figures,   140,  285. 

China-stone,  2. 

Chinese  characters,  marks,  35,  517,  619,  663,  S3;  porcelain,  45,  725c,  817,  168: 
ditto,  decorated  in  England,  81 1-816,  1O5  ;  ditto,  imitations  of,  35,  50,  80,  101, 
105,  108,  116,  128,  130,  132a,  151,  156,  158,  162164,  349,  373,  479,  483, 
484,486,  596,  614,  616  619,  632,  634,  645,  653,  655,  674,  712,  713.  721,  723, 
725,  725a,  757,  f',  30,  81. 

Christian,  I'hilip,  potter,   151. 

Cibber,  Mrs.,  actress,  figure,   186. 

"  Ciihere,  Les  Cavaliei-s  de,"  inscription,  270. 

Clapham,  Chelsea  vases  at,  241. 

Claret-colour,  239,  336,  455,  456,  31. 

Clerkenwell,  807. 

Clive,  ICitty,  actress,  figure,    135a. 

Clubs,  Ace  of,  258. 

Coalbrookdale  factor\',   164. 

Coalport  factory,   149,   161,   164  ;   porcelain,  810. 

Cobalt-blue,  2. 

Cochin,  C.  N.,  engraver,  59,  428. 

Cock  and  Jewel,  fable,  255. 

Coke,  Daniel  Parker,  of  Trusley,  466. 

Colonies,  American,  202. 

Columbine,  figure,    198. 

Comedy,  figure,  557. 

Commedia  deW  Arte  (Italian  Comedy),  characters  from,  21,  22. 

Cc)mmerce,  group,  427. 

Continents,  Four,  figures,  8,   184,  202,  684,  685. 

Convention,  Anglo- Prussian,  4. 

Conway,  Field-Marshal,  figure,  200,  31. 

Cooke,  crest  of,  577. 

Cooks,  figures,  20. 

Cookworthy,  William,  of  Plymouth,    134,  726,  \iii,   123,    133:    family,  crest  of,  743. 

Cooper's  Company,  London,  438. 

Copeland,  W.  T.,  potter,   154. 

Cornelian  uitagli,  313  323. 

Cottage  china,  134. 


174  INDEX. 

Coventry,  Earl  of,  527. 

Cowles,  William,  service  made  foi,  770. 

Cox,  James,  of  Chelsea,  29. 

Craenen,  dealer,  203. 

Craft,  Thomas,  of  Bow,  68,  4. 

Crescent,    mark,    83,    155;    black,    631;    l)lue    enamel,    574,  586,    644;    blue    printed, 

520,  521,  571,  803a;    blue,  underglaze,  479,   490,   496,  508,530,  579,  589,   616, 

618,  626,  633,  642;  gold,  644;  red,  625. 
Crcwkerne,  arms,  523. 
Crispe,  china- maker,  20. 
Crispin,  dealer,   12. 
Cross,  mark,  6,   134  :  blue,  723,  746,  748,  750,  753,  754,  758,  759,  761,  764766,  769, 

770,  772,  773,  775-778,  780;   incised,  564;  red,  65,    106. 
Crossed  swords,  mark.     See  Swords,  crossed. 
"  Crown  Derby  "  porcelain,  77. 
Crowther,  John,  4  ;   Robert,  4. 
Cumberland,  Duke  of,   133,   135a,  2f). 
Cupid,  figures,   265,   270,   292,   295,   300,    319,    323,    327,    409,    410,    422,   426,   429; 

painted,  449. 
Cupids,  groups  of,  411,   427,  427a. 
Curiosite,  La,  group,  428. 

d,  mark,  38. 

D,    crowned,    mark,    460-467,    471,     472,    474-477,    76;     with    anchor,     mark,     440, 

443-447,  450,  452-455,  (5 
Dagger,  mark,  53. 

Dagger  and  anchor,  mark,  3,    13,  48,  62,  66,  67,  368,  6. 
Dance,  Nathaniel,  painter,  205. 
Danse  Allewande,  La,  group,  415. 
Daphne,  figure,  263. 
Davenport,  John,  potter,   153. 
"Davenport,  Longport,"  mark,  791. 
Davis,  William,  of  Worcester,  Si. 
Davlesford  House,  Sale,  339. 
Deift  ware,   Bristol,   110. 
De  Grasse,  Admiral,  465. 
De  Maan,  dealer,  735. 
Denmark,  Crown  Prince  of,  264. 
Derby,  factory,   1-4,  29,30,65,    76,  119,  161,  169,  428,   731,   792;    porcelain,    409-477, 

684,   153  ;  trinkets,  327. 
Derwent,  view  on  the,  471. 
"  De  Vaux,  Miss,"  inscription,  497. 
Devonshire,  Duchess  of,  452. 
Diane  Chasseresse,  statue,  684. 
Dillwyn,  Lewis  Llewelyn,  M.P.,  809. 
Dilhvyn,  Lewis  Weston,  163. 
Dirksen,  dealer,  413. 
Discretion,  statuette,  410. 


IXDEX.  J  75 


Diseiise  d'Aventure,   La,  engraving,  561,  610. 

Distilling,  figures,  296. 

Dixon,  J.,  engraver,  205. 

Dovedale,  view  of,  792. 

Downes,  arms,  493. 

Dyaiightsman's    Assistaul,   The,  2. 

Drummer,  figure,   18. 

Dresden,   172,  30,  167;  porcelain  bought  at,   791. 

Dublin,  National  Museum,    134. 

"  Duck's  Egg,"  porcelain,   163. 

Duesbury,  William,  of  Derby,    138,    174,  4,  29,  65,  76,    in) 

Dwarfs,  figures,   167. 

Dyson  Perrins  Collection,  787a,  82. 


Eagle  and  Jackdaw,  fable,  356. 

Earl's  pattern,  Blind,  527-529,  587. 

Earth,  figure,  731,  732. 

Eberlein,  Johann  Friedrich,  modeller,    180,    181. 

Edinburgh,  bust  acquired  at,    134;  painting  at,    177 

Edkins  Collection,  739. 

Egg-shell  porcelain,  814,  816. 

Elements,  Four,  figures,  731,   732. 

Elizabeth,  Queen,  bust,  557. 

Ely,  Marquis  of,  arms.  523. 

Emden  Collection,   180. 

Empire  style,  791. 

Esdaile,  William,  Collection,  241. 

Etuis,  Chelsea,  262-268. 

Evans,  Sevres  painter,  726. 

Exchange,  Royal,  bust  at,    134. 

Exeter,  porcelain  bought  at,  801. 


F,  mark,  96. 

Faber,  John,  engraver,  554. 

Fable  candlesticks,  255. 

Fables,  Aesop's,  255,  352,  356,  384,  385,  387,  406. 

Falconet,  Etienne,  sculptor,  415,  420,   428. 

FalstalT,  figures,    135a,    136,  204. 

Fame,  print,  488,  547,  549,  552,  553,  555,  556. 

Famille  rose,    101,    116,  645,    167;  vei'te,  713. 

Faulkener,  Sir  Everard,  30. 

Fen  Ting,  porcelain,  45. 

Fcng-hiiang,    349. 

Ferdinand  of  Brunswick,  Prince,  portrait,  785. 

Fetes,   Veniliennes,  engraving,   177. 

Fife-player,  figure,   18. 

Fine  Gentleman,  The,  figure,   135. 


176  INDl'X. 

Fine  Lady,  The,  figure,    1 35a. 

Fire,  figure,  731. 

Fitzlienry  Collection,   I. 

Fitzwilliain,  Earl,   156. 

Flaudin,  Madame,  dealer,  416. 

Flight,  Thomas,  and  Sons,  81,   149,   161. 

Fogg,  dealer,  20. 

Foire  de  Caiupagnc,  engraving,  428. 

Fontainebleau,   138. 

Forum,  Rome,  prints,  498,  499a. 

Fox,  Dog  and  Cock,  fable,  352. 

Fox,  Henry,  Lord  Holland,  30. 

Fox,  Miss,  viii. 

France,  porcelain,  2  ;  war  with,  790. 

Fraiifois  I.,  Nourrice  de,    138. 

Franke,  J.  H.  C,  painter,  696. 

Frankfort-on-the-Main,  objects  bought  at,    121,  327. 

Franks,  Sir  A.  WoUaston,  683. 

Frederick  the  Great,  4,  254;  figure,  696;  portraits,   113,  488,  505,  547,  549. 

Freemasonry,  emblems,  86,  545,  558. 

French  porcelain,  428,   i(>8  :  sprig  pattern,  463,  538,    1,5?. 

Fretted    square,    mark,    478,  507,  523,  537,  588,  599,  602,  604,  608,  615,  622,  635, 

654,  656,  661,  83. 
Frit,   I. 

F'rve,  Thomas,  of  Bow,  35,  4- 

Fuchien  porcelain,  imitations  of,  50,  80,    132a,    151,    156,    158,   162-164,  6. 
Fiirstenberg  porcelain,   282,   463. 

G,  mark,  414,  416,  430,  435,  805. 

Gainsborough,  Thomas,  painter,  541,  560,   784,  82. 

Galantee-show,  group,  428. 

Gallant  kissing  his  hand,  figure,  26. 

Ganz,  dealer,  252,  483,  558. 

Gardeners,  figures,  23,  689. 

Gavniiures  de  Lhemuicc,    192,    193,   706,   707. 

Garrick,  David,    135;    ligures,    135a,    185.  205,  676. 

Geometry,  figure,  411. 

German  porcelain,  2,   167. 

George  IL,  29,    133;  bust,   134;  portraits,  4,  546,  551. 

George  HL,  254,  347,  492;  arms  of,  790;  portrait,  555. 

Gilbody,  Samuel,  potter,   151. 

Giles,  enameller,  167. 

Gisburne,  Rev.  Thomas  of  Derby,  452. 

Goatherd,  figure,  734. 

Gorkum,  dealer,  259. 

Gouyn,  Charles,  29. 

Graham,  Sir  Bellingham,  arms,  572. 

Granada,  porcelain  bought  at,  273. 

Granby,  Marquis,  figure  of,  6,  5  ;  portrait,  553. 


INDEX  177 

Great  Newport  Street,  workroom,  65. 

Green,  Guy,  of  Liverpool,   131. 

Greenwich,  statue  at,   134. 

"  Greethead,  Josiah  &  Catharine,"   inscription,  757. 

Griffin,  mark,  794-796,   156. 

Grignion,  Charles,  engraver,  562. 

Guerto,  iVIrs.,  dealer,  801. 

Guest,  Mr.  Ivor,  487. 

Hague,  objects  acquired  at  The,   18,  264,  413. 

Haliburton,  Mrs.,  Collection,  730. 

Hamburg,  objects  acquired  at,  276,  409. 

Hamburger,  dealer,  332. 

Hamilton,  arms,  523. 

Hampton,  villa  at,    135a. 

Hampton  Court,  vase  at,  237. 

Hancock,    Robert,     engraver,     131,    487,     488,     492,    500,    505,    541.    549-551,    553, 

555  557,  561-563,  568,  607,  610,  611,  623,  627,  628,  630,  666  668,  f  ,  Ni 
Ilandelaar,  dealer,  421. 

Hanley  Museum,   119;  porcelain,  803a,   155. 
Hard  paste,   i,  2,   123,   133. 
Harford,  Joseph,  of  Bristol,  780. 
Harlequin,  figures,    178,    198,  318. 
Hastings,   \\'arren,  pattern,  339. 
i  layes,  arms,  816a. 
Hayman,  Francis,  painter,   135,  562. 
"  Hazard,  playing  at,"  group,  428. 
Heath,  John,  of  Derby,  29,  76. 
Henry  V.,  bust,  557. 
Herculaneum  potteiy,  Liverpool,   151. 
Hercules,  figures,   139,  412,  413. 
1  leylyn,   Edward,  of  How,  4. 
Hickey,  Joseph,  of  Bristol,  780. 
I  listory,  figure,  472. 
I  loare,  ^^'iIliam,  painter,  556. 
Holdship,    Josiah  and   Richard,    of    Worcester,    488,    546,    540,    550,    607,    623,  628, 

667,  82. 
i  lolland,  Lord,  30. 
I  lolland  House,  30. 
I  lop-trellis  pattern,  605. 
Hopetoun,  Lady,  683. 
Horse  and  Stag,  fable,  387. 
Horse  Guards,  uniform,  6. 

I  louston,   Richard,  engraver,  5,  6,  488,  547,  552,  553,  556. 
Hudson,  15enjamin,  572. 
Hughes,   Mr.,  of  Liverpool,  71. 
I  lume,  arms,  523. 

Hurdy-gurdy  player,  figure-,    178,   738. 
1  lussar,  figure,    199. 


,78  INDEX. 

Hydra,  Hei-culcs  and,  group,  412,   413. 

Hygieia,  figure,  410. 

"Hyson  Tia,"  inscription,    |12. 

I,  marl<,    18. 

Imari  ware,  imitations  of,  3^7,  663,  30,  82. 

Indian  women,  figures,  8,  202,  684. 

Intagli,  312-323. 

Isleworth  porcelain,    106. 

Italian  Comedy,  figures,  21,  22. 

Italy,  porcelain   in,  2. 

Jackdaw,  the  Vain,  fable,  255. 

Jackfield  pottery,  164. 

Jacob,  dealer,  728. 

jade,  Chinese  character  for,  35. 

"Japanese    porcelain,    imitations    of,     42,    55,    69,   91,    98.    127,    237,    238,    337,    346, 

350,  382,  383,   388,    403,    405,    507,   508,    535,    597,    599,   604,   624,   638,    639, 

641,  647,  659,  663,  718,  745,  82. 
Jasper  lid,  273- 

"Jet-enamelled"  porcelain,  539. 
Jewitt,  Llewellynn,  collection,  236. 
Joss-stick  holder,   150. 
jubilee  of  George  III.,  492. 
June,  J.,  engraver,  39. 
Jupiter,  symbol  for,  mark,   123. 
Jurnel,  dealer,  425. 
Justice,  figure,    182. 

K,  mark,  27,  123. 

Kaendler,   Johann    Joachim,    modeller,    17,   21,   25,  26,    29,    94,     172,     174,     188,     197, 

198,   5 

Kakivemon,    potter,    style    of,    42,    55,  69,    91,    98,    127,    237,    238,    349,    350,    382, 
383,  388,  403,  405,  597,  624,  641,  659,  6,  30. 

Kalb  and  Soujet,  dealers,  408. 
Kaolin,  2,   123. 
Kean,  Michael,  of  Derby,  76. 
Kent,  William,  sculptor,  557. 
Kentish  Town,   167. 
Kingsbridge,  collection  at,  viii. 
Kite,  Mr.,  of  Devizes,   110. 
Kneller,  Sir  Godfrey,  painter,  431. 

L,  mark,  788. 

L,  double,  mark,  646,  683,  76,  S3,    119. 

"  Labrado,"  inscription,  554. 

Ladies'  Amusement,   The,  39,    110,  484,  630,  xvii,  2,  4,  82. 

Lantevne  magique.  La,  group,  428. 

Lazarus,  dealer,  254. 


IXDLX.  179 

Lear,  King,  figure,   137. 

Le  Bas,  J.  P.,  engraver,  423,  82. 

Leclerc,  F.  G.,  medallist,  432. 

Leda  and  the  Swan,  group,    171. 

Lemoyne,  Frani^ois,  painter,   139. 

Lequoi,  painter,  726. 

Lethe,  Garrick's,    135,   135a. 

Lettuce-leaf  dishes,  342. 

Lion  and  Mouse,  fable,  384. 

Lissauer,  dealer,  409. 

Littler,  William,  potter,   iig. 

Liverpool  porcelain,  784-789,   151. 

Lock,  author,  201. 

Loftus,  Nicholas,  arms,  523. 

London,  objects  acquired  in,  58,  322,   342,  504,  523,    740;    porcelain    enamelled    in, 

65,  572,  806,  807,    161,   1O5,   107;    wareliouscs  ni,  83,   158. 
Longport  porcelain,  791,    133. 

Longton  Hall  porcelain,  676-683,  788,   i,  3,   119. 
Lonsdale,  Earl  of,  Collection,  337. 
iMcrie,  La,  group,  428. 
Louis  XVL  style,  65,  83,   134. 
Louisbourg,  capture  of,  554,  784. 
Louvre,  Paris,  works  of  art  in,    139,  684. 
"  Love  in  disguise,"  figure,  426. 
Lowestoft    church,  596,  817;    factory,   i,  3,   15S  ;    porcelain,  797-799;    "  trille    from," 

797,  798. 
Lowris'  china  house,  87,   133. 
"Lucreticv,  Doinina',"   inscription,    176. 

M,  mark,  416,  155. 

Macarony  dog  and  cat,  figures,  416. 

Madrid,  figure  bought  at.  7. 

Magna  Charta,  201. 

Mann,  Sir  Horace,  254. 

Manners,  General  John,  ligure,  6  ;  portrait,  553. 

Maries,  Three,  group,   170. 

Marlborough,   Duke  of,  Collection,  409. 

Mars,  figures,   190,  552,  553;  symbol  for,  marl<,  5. 

Martindale,  arms,  573. 

"  Mascoraders,"  figures,    174. 

May-blossom  decoration,  249. 

May  Day,  engraving,  562,  563. 

Mazarine-blue,  241,  250,   251,   254,   257,   264,   283.  343,  347,  31,  65. 

McArdell,  James,  engraver,    135,    143,   204,  492,  555. 

Merklenburg-Strelitz,  Duke  of,  254,  347,  31. 

Meissen  factorv,  2,  5,  167;  mark,  401,  668,  764,  771,  774,  779,  7C.,  83;  models 
for  figures,  I,  17,  21,  25,  26,  29,  94,  166,  172,  174,  180,  181.  188,  189, 
195,  i97,  198,  280,  330,  427a,  430,  5,  134;  porcelain,  101.  102.  116;  style, 
245,  335,  339,   372,   378,   386,   390,   407,  30,  82. 


I  So  INDEX. 

Mercury,  figure,   179;  symbol  for,  mark-,  2,   147,  5. 

Mersey,  River,   151. 

Merthyr  'lydfil,  161. 

Metz,  figures  bouglit  at,  731. 

Meyer,  Jeremiah,  painter,  555. 

Minden,  battle  of,  6,  553,  785. 

Minerva,  figures,  7,  412,  413,  556. 

Minerva  Medica,  Temple  of,  Rome,  664a. 

Minton,  Thomas,  potter,   180,  470,  803,  154. 

Minuet  dancers,  figures,   177. 

Mirror,  stand  for,  250. 

Monkey  orchestra,  figures,   172. 

Moon,  Chinese  character  for,  617. 

More,  Hannah,  739. 

Morpurgo,  dealer,  313. 

Morley,  Earl,  726. 

Mortlock,  John,  dealer,  806,  807. 

Mosley,  Charles,  engraver,   13Sa. 

Mould  for  porcelain,    132. 

Munchen,  dealer,    18. 

Murray,  Capt.  H.  B.,  bequest,  421. 

Music,  group,  424. 

"Music  Lesson,"  group,   192. 

Musicians,  figures,  425. 

N,  mark,  457. 

Nantgarw  porcelain,  804-807,   161,   163,  164. 

"  NANTGARW  c.  w.,"  mark,  804,  806,  807. 

National  Portrait  Gallery,  556. 

Negroes  and  negresses,  figures,   16,   17,  29,   187. 

New  Canton,  4. 

New  Hall  factory,  2,  133. 

Nilson,  J.  E.,  engraver,   192. 

"  No.,"  mark,  65. 

Nceiid  de  Cravatc,   Lc,  grouji,  420. 

Nollekens,  sculptor,  304. 

Norman,  Mr.  Emerson,   167. 

Norwich,  figures  from,   167. 

Nottingham,  466. 

Nouryice  dc  Fraufois  I.,  figure,    138. 

Numerals,  marks,   108,   112,   129,   158. 

Nursing  figures,   138,  301. 

O,  mark,  434. 
Omphale,  figure,    139. 
Oppenheim,  299. 
Oracle,  L\  group,  420. 
Orchestra,  monkey,  figures,   172. 
Ornevtanistes,  2. 
Otaheite  swallow,  809. 


INDEX.  i8i 

J',  mark,  38. 

Painting,  figure,   173. 

Palissy,  Bernard,  potter,   138. 

Paris," objects  acquired  in,    12,    174,  299,  401,  416,  425   442;  statue  in    684. 

Parrot  pattern,  645. 

Partridge  pattern,  69,  91,  624,  641,  659,  6;   tmeens,  330. 

Paste  of  English  porcelain,   i. 

Pastille-burners,  249,  741. 

Patch-boxes,  275,  277. 

Patel,  Pierre  Antoine,  painter,  489,  608. 

Pea-green,  246,  247,  31. 

Peak,  Derbyshire,  view  in,  471. 

Peddie,  arms,  523. 

Pedlar,  figure,   168. 

"Pencilled  porcelain,"  518. 

Pennington,  Seth  and  John,  potters,   151. 

Pensent-ils  an  raisin?  group,  423. 

Pesne,  Antoine,  painter,   113,  488,  547,  549. 

Petuntse,  2. 

Phillips,  Charles,  engra^•er,  409. 

Piccadilly,  516a. 

Pigeon  tureen,  329. 

Pillement,  Jean,  designer,  482,  609,  2,  82. 

Pinxton  factory,  466. 

Pipe-bowl,  494. 

Pipe-clay,  4. 

Pitt,  William,  the  Elder,  figure,  202;  pcjrtrait,  556. 

Plenty,  figure,  419. 

Pluto",  figure,   142. 

Pluyne,  Van  der,  dealer,    180,  463. 

Plymouth,  factory,  2,  133;   porcelain,  684-727. 

Pococke,  Dr.,   133. 

Poland,  King  of,  26,  254. 

Polwortli,  arms,  523. 

Pond,  Arthur,  engraver,    143. 

Ponte  Rotto,   Rome,  672. 

Pope,  Alexander,  bust,  431. 

Popolo,  Piazza  del,  Rome,  664a. 

Pots,  Two,  fable,  385. 

Powder-blue,  601,  604,  651,  658,  "^J. 

Prideaux  Collection,  691,  695,  706,  707,  710,  712  714,  717,  720-727,  752,  770. 
viii,   123,   134. 

Printing  on  porcelam,  2,  6,  81,  134,  149,  151,  154;  black,  4,  58,61,  65,  73,  88,  89, 
93,  122,  482,  487  489,  492,  498  500,  505,  522,  532,  533,  539,  545  569,  607, 
610  612,  623,  627  630,  665  668,  670,  672,  784  786,  789,  796;  blue,  520,  521, 
571,  759,  790,  803a;  Inown,  59a,  59b,  76,  664;  crimson,  470,  669;  grey,  620; 
iliac,  124,  125,  481,  513,  541,  570,  664a,  671;  purple,  77,  608,  609;  piuplish- 
black,  59,  74  ;  red,  71. 

"  Proposal,"  group,  420. 


1 82  INDRX. 

Prudence,  figure,  410. 

Prussia,  arms  of,  4;  King  i.f,    113,  254,  488,  505,  547,  549,  696 

Punch,  figures,   167,   137. 

Punch-pot,  363. 

Ouail-pattcrn,  69,  91,  624,  641,  659. 
Quebec,  battle  of,  5,  552,  784. 
Queen's  Square,  Bristol,  statue,    134. 
Quin,  James,  actor,  figure,    135a,   136,  204. 

R,  mark,    192,    193. 

Rabbit  tureen,  328. 

Rafter,  Kitt_v,  actress,  figure,    135a. 

Ramsay,  Allan,  painter,  554. 

Randall,  enameller,  807. 

Ranelagh  figures,   176. 

Raphael,  dealer,  7. 

Raree-show,  group,  428. 

Reaper,  figure,   191. 

Red  Indian  woman,  figure,  8. 

Reynolds,  Sir  Joshua,  painter,  6,   105,  508,  553. 

Rhodes,  David,  enameller,  61,  65. 

Richard  III.,  figure,    135a,  205,  557. 

Richmond,  figures  bought  at,  730. 

Rights,  Bill  of,  201. 

Robins  and  Randall,  enamellers,  807. 

Robinson,  enameller,  65. 

Rockingham,  Marquis  of,  i  ^r,. 

Rockingham  Works,  794-796,   156. 

Rodney",  Lord,  465,  555. 

Rohnstock,  portrait  at,   113. 

Rome,  views  in,   125,  498,  499a,  664a,  672. 

Rose,  John,  jxitter,   149,   i(">4. 

Rose,  jamilh\    101,    116. 

Ross,  James,  engraver,  558;  82. 

Rotherham,  156. 

Rotterdam,  objects  acquired  at,    180,  209,   273,  300,   328,  463,  735,   736,  738. 

Rotto,  Ponte,  Rome,  672. 

Roubiliac,  Louis  Francis,  sculptor,  23,    178,    192,    193,  31. 

Rousseau,  Jean  Jacques,  bust,  432. 

"Rural  Lovers,  The,"  print,  541. 

Rysbrack,  sculptor,   134. 

S,  mark,  781,   149,   164. 

S,  double,  mark,  803,  154. 

Sadler,  John,  printer,  612,  784,  785,   151. 

St.  Vincent,  Cape,  battle  of,  555. 

Salisbury,  exhibition  at,   168,  219,  225,  229,  232,  690,  703;  mug  bought  at,  108. 


INDEX.  183 

Salopian  porcelain,  140. 

Salt-glazed  ware,  53,    116,    117,  4<>6,  503.    119,   167. 

Samuel,  dealer,  740. 

Saqui,  painter,  726. 

Saver,  Robert,  publisher,  541,  568,  627,  670,  2,  Sj. 

Savers,  dealer,  646. 

Saxon  Court  Orchestra,   172. 

Saxon  Porcelain  Manufactory,  Royal,   167. 

Saxonv,  Elector  of,  26. 

Scale-pattern,  478,  589,  650,  652,  661,  82. 

Scheemakers,  Peter,  sculptor,  313,  557. 

Scent-bottles,   166,  262,  279-303. 

Science  crroups,  411. 

Scotin,  G.,  engraver,  789. 

Scotland,  National  Gallerv  of,    177. 

Seals,  312-325,  327. 

Seasons,  figures  and  groups,  12,  23,  27,  95,  169,  180,  183,  191,  193,  195,  417,  421. 
430,  680,  681,  687,  688,  695,   729,   730,   786. 

Senatorial  Bridge,  Rome,  view  (;f,  672. 

Senteuv,  Eau  de,  282. 

Seven  Years'  War,    113. 

Sevres,  factory,  726,  2,  169;  mark,  646,  7(\  S3.  155:  models,  415,  420,  435;  porce- 
lain,   171,  428;  style,  449,  453,  605,  613,  657,   791,  31,   161. 

Shakespeare,  figure,  313;  print.  557. 

Sharp,  music,  mark,  35,  83. 

Shelton  porcelain,   133. 

Shepherds  and  shepherdesses,  figures,   194,  735,  736. 

Shorthose,  John,  potter,   155. 

"  Shorthose  &  Co.,"  mark,  803a. 

Shropshire  potteries,  149. 

Silversmith's  work,   157,  29,  81. 

Sinclair,  arms,  523. 

"Small,"  incised  mark,  421. 

Smith,  Capt.  II.,  sketch  by.  5,  552. 

Smith,  J.,  engraver,  431. 

Soapstone,  2,  81. 

Soft  paste,  45,   i,   133. 

Soho,  29. 

Spa  Fields,  807. 

Sprimont,  Nicholas,  of  Chelsea,  29. 

Speyer,  dealer,  420. 

Sphinxes,  figures,   143,   144. 

"  SPODE,"  mark,  800-802. 

Spode,  Josiah,  potter,  2,  153. 

Spring,  figures,    12,    193,    195,  430,  687,   688,  695,  729,  730. 

Square,  fretted,  mark.  478,  507,  523,  537,  588,  599,  602,  604,  608,  615,  622,  635, 
650,  654,  656,  661,  83. 

Staffordshire  porcelain,  36,  47,  117,  332,  354,  470,  676  683,  791,  800-803a,  2,  81, 
119,   133,   153-155;  salt-glazed  ware,  S3,  496,  503,   167. 


iS4  INDEX. 

stairs,   L.hIv,  69. 

Stand  for  a  mirror,  250. 

Steatite,  2,  81. 

Stephens,  William,  769,  778,   i34- 

Stern,  S.,  dealer,  276. 

Stockholm,  National  Museum,    171,  423. 

Stoke-upon-Trent,  470,  800-803,   119,   153.   i54- 

Stork,  figure,   150. 

Strawberry  Hill,   135a. 

"  Street,  Richard,"   inscription,  792. 

Stroobant,  dealer,   182. 

Stuart,  arms,  572. 

Sullivan,  Luke,  engraver,  487,  541,  560,  562. 

Summer,  figures,    191,    193,  417,   729,   730. 

Sunflower  dishes,  345. 

Swallow  of  Otaheite,  809. 

Swansea  factory,  161,   163,   164  ;  mark,  808,  809. 

Swinton  porcelain,   156,  793-796. 

Swords,  crossed,  mark,  401,  407,  668,  764,   771,  779,  9,  31,  76,  83,   134. 

T,  mark,  51,  65,  711. 

TafE  Valley,  161. 

Tancred,  Garrick  as,  figure,    185. 

Taraval,  |.  H.,  painter,  432. 

Targett,  dealer,   108. 

"Tea  Partv,  The,"  print,   131,  500,  610,  668. 

Tebo,  modeller,  5-7,    10,    11,  41,  43,  51,  711,  729-732,   734,   737,  738,   5.  ^j>   '31- 

Tehua,  province,  6. 

Tennyssen,  dealer,  264. 

TF,  monogram,  mark  resembling,  35,  38,  52,  58,  83. 

Thibaud,  modeller,  5. 

Thorns,  Merton,  Collection,  568,  670,  2. 

Thomson,  poet,   185. 

Thimble,  306. 

Thorp  Cloud,  view  of,  471. 

Time  and  Love,  group,  409. 

Tin,  sign  for,  mark,  706,  707,  709a,  711-718,  720,  721,  723,  724,   726,  727,  123,  134. 

Tim;,  porcelain,  45. 

"T'ithe  Pig,  The,"  group,  203. 

T',  mark,  5-7,   10,    11,  41,  43,  51,  711,  729,  731,  737,  738,  5.  ^2,   134- 

Tobacco-stopper,  311. 

"  Topers,  The,"  figures,  694. 

Tournai  porcelain,  731. 

Tourniquet,  Lc,  group,  428. 

Toys,  Chelsea,  30. 

Tragedy,  figure,  print,  557. 

Trajan's  Column,  views  of,  498,  499a. 

Transfer-printing,  81,  134,  149,   151- 

Trapnell  Collection,  720. 


INDKX.  185 


Tregellis,  Miss,  viii. 

Triangle,  mark,    157,    160,  333,  377,  2  j. 

Triangle  player,  rigur(\  738. 

'i'rident,  mark,  84,  808,   iG^. 

Trinkets,  Chelsea,  327. 

Triton,  figure,  414. 

Trusley,  466. 

Turkish  costume,  figures  in,  2,  3,  25,  29,   196. 

Turner,  Thomas,  dealer,   139,   150,   175. 

Turner,  Thomas,  potter,  149,   164. 

Turquoise-blue,  276,  31. 

Tyers,  Jonathan,  562. 

Union  Jack,  mark,  83. 

Utrecht,  objects  acquired  at,  259,  332,  431. 

V,  mark,  673. 

Van  der  Pluyne,  dealer,  463. 

\'andyke,  Anthony,  painter,  409. 

Van  Galen,  dealer,  26. 

Van  Herck,  dealer,  176. 

Van  Minden,  dealer,  209,  273,  300,  328. 

Vauxhall  Gardens,  562. 

Vcniticiincs,  Fetes,  engraving,    177. 

Venus,  figures,  9,  728. 

\'espasian.  Temple  of,  Rome,  view,   125. 

Vienna  porcelain,  411. 

Virgin,  figure,   170. 

Vivaudicre,  Mrs.  Gibber  as,   186, 

Vivares,  Francis,  engraver,  489,    541,  608,  672. 

\'olunteer  movement,  790. 

W,  mark,  485,  580,  605,  83. 

Wales,  Princess  Dowager  ol',  488,  547. 

Walker,  R.,  drawing  by,   110. 

Walker,  Samuel,  potter,   161,  163. 

Wall,  Dr.   ]ohn,  of  Worcester,  787a,  Si. 

Wallace  Collection,  789. 

Walpole,  Horace,    1 35a,  200,  254,  773,  viii,  29. 

Waltzers,  figures,   174. 

Wanitz,  dealer,  174. 

Wasters  from  Bow  factory,    132a,  vii,  4. 

Watch-chain  pendants,  307-310. 

Watelet,  C.  II.,  engraver,    432. 

Water,  figure,  731. 

Watteau,  Antoine,  painter,  59,    177,   561,  610,  661,   789,  82 

Weatherby,  of  Bow,  4. 

Webster,  Moses,  painter,  807. 


i86  IXDKX. 

Wedgwood,  Josiah.  potter,  65,  414,  5,   134. 

Wemyss,  Earl  of,  CoUecUnn,  6,  553. 

West  Indies,  battle  in,  465. 

Westminster  Abbey,  313,  557. 

Whiteford,  Mr.  Sidney  T.,  726,  743. 

Whitton,  Middlesex,  view  at,  561,  566. 

Wilkes,  John,  figure,   135a,  200,  201. 

Wille,  J.  G.,  engraver,    113. 

Willett  Collection,   157. 

William  III.,  statue,   134. 

William  IV.,   156. 

William  Augustus,  Duke  of  Cumberland,  29;  bust  of,    133. 

Williams,  Sir  Charles  Hanbury,  30. 

Wilson,  Thomas,  of  Bridlington,  572. 

Wimborne,  Lord,  487. 

Winter,  figures,    12,  27,  95,    169,    193,    195,  421,  688,  695,  729,  730. 

Withers,  Edward,  painter,  465,  77. 

Woffington,  Peg,  actress,    143. 

Wolf  and  Crane,  fable,  384. 

Wolf  and  Goat,  fable,  406. 

Wolfe,  General,  figure,  5,  5;  portraits,  552,  784. 

Wolfsohn,  dealer,  791. 

Woobourn,  Surrey,  view  at,  487,  541,  562. 

Woodward,  Henry,  actor,  figure,    135. 

Woollett,  William,  engraver,  561,  566. 

Worcester    Corporation    jug,  578;    factory,  450,   1-3,  6,    Si,   134,  149,   161;    porcelain,  ; 

478-675,    713,     15S  ;    Chinese    porcelain    decorated    at,    812-815,    i(>b ;     Works  I 

Museum,  53,  75,  518,  555,  645.  { 

Worlidge,  Thomas,  engraver,    135a,  546.  | 

"Wreathing"  in  Plymouth,  porcelain,   123.  ■ 

Yorkshire  porcelain,   156. 
Young,  William  Weston,  potter,   161. 
Yii,  Chinese  character,  mark,  35. 
Yueh,  Chinese  character,  617. 

Zodiac,  signs  of,  730.  j 


Platk  I 


2 

227 

12 

7 
188 

22 

12 

7 

2 

1 

20 

30 

25 

1 

29 

197 
HOW. 

29 

Plate 


4, 

^J;^  it  ^ 


.  f^ 


vMt  ^  tfS 


4? 
1 


181 

15 

19 

15 

24 

17 

198 

21 

198 

17 

95 

3 

8 

BOW. 

9 

94 

Plate  3 


4.       JiinTAN.NIA. 

B()\\". 


Plate  4 


O 


Plate  5 


Plate  6 


Plate  7 


23.     AinuMN. 
BOW. 


Plate  8 


5      9 


Plate  9 


143       701      136     146       143 
158        152         149  162  164 

154        155       151      147        159 
BOW. 


Plate  io 


137.      King   I.i.ak. 
130\V. 


Plati- 


142 


141 


113 

HOW. 


Plate  12 


m      O 


Plate  13 


105 


71 


84 

57 

85 

93 

51 
86 

46 

109 

564 

119 
368 

r.ow. 

106 

107 
t 

56 


67 


Plate  14 


166 


133 


301 


161 


134 


157 


CI  11;  I. SKA. 


Plate  15 


Plate   i6 


139.      Hhkcui.es  .AND  Omphai.i:,  after   I.ciiKiyno. 


Plate  17 


Pl.ATIi    l8 


•w* 


^^ 


^ 

^-"x^ 

^o-^. 


■^ 


i^^«>^'^^  ^ 


174 

229 

207 

183 
172 

207 

230 

173 

167 

208 

167 

173 

211 

219 

175 
ClIlvLSlC  \. 

219 

218 

Plate  iq 


168 

202 

168 

187 

186 

184 

185 

187 

190 

170 
CIIICLSKA. 

190 

Plate  20 


171.       l.i;i)A    AND     I  HE    SWAX. 

CHELSEA. 


Plate  21 


182 
201 


176 
204  200 

CHKI.SKA. 


Plate  22 


Plate  2^ 


191 

CIlI'.l.SKA. 


Plate  24 


192.      1  HI,   Music   Lksson.     .Modellcil  by  Roubiliac  after  Bmiclicr. 
CUKLSKA. 


Plate  23 


~       s. 


Plate  26 


196 

Clll'LSKA. 


Platk  27 


202.      I. OKU  CiiATriAM. 
CIIKI.SKA. 


Plate  28 


2;     J 

CM  — 


Platf,  29 


237 
CIIKLSKA. 


Plate  30 


Plate  -^i 


194 

240 

194 

255 

241 

255 

Clll.l.SI- 

;.\, 

Plate 


Plate  33 


f    ^    ^l^ 


% 


A'-     E; 


/i^-.■^ 


290      195    300     199     285     195 


294 

288 

283 

289 

297 

299 

293 

292 

291 

298 

274 

209 

303 

269 

275 

276 
CllKLSKA. 

272 

277 

Plate  34 


363 

369 

120 

371 

121 

366 

367 

399 
372 

99 

374 
373 

98 

351 

328 

81 

361 

259 
CIIl'LSKA. 

379 

Plate  35 


377 


352 


378 


376 

333 

375 

383 

405 

356 

388 

387 

346 

CHELSF.A. 

385 

Plate  36 


243 
386 

341 

339 
334 

CHKLSL 

A. 

340 

245 

401 

Plate  37 


Plate  38 


253 


390 

248 

396 

389 

439 

250 
CIIEI.SKA. 

362 

253 


Plate  39 


Plate  40 


414 

180 


179  409 

205  424 

CHELSEADI-.KP.V. 


Plate  41 


419 

426 

410 

433 

410 

429 

427a 

430 

427 

430 

411 

425 

431 

418 

432 

425 

416 

203 

415 

417 

415 

CI  IK 

:i.SK.\-i)i' 

Rl 

I'.V. 

Plate  42 


1'latk 


43 


423.     Pensciit-ils  an   Raisin,  aftei-  Rouclicr. 
CllKI.Si;.\I)i:RliV. 


Plate  44 


413.     Minerva  crowning  Constancy. 
CHF.LSE.'\-I)KRHY. 


n 


Plate  45 


392 


258 
452 


446 


456 


242 

437 

394 

444 

455 

45' 

451 

441 

448 

Clll-I.SI'.A-Dl-.RI'.V. 


Plate  46 


Platk  4^ 


Plati-;  48 


436 


4S'J 


435 
463     468 


469        453 

477  465  477 

472  460  472 

CHELSKA- DERBY  anu  DERnV. 


Plate  49 


Plate  50 


478 

WORCESTER 


Plate  51 


43 

\VOKCI£STER. 


Plate  52 


Plate  53 


35 
WORCESTER. 


Platk  54 


Plate  55 


599 


480 


597 


643 
659 

486 
588 

639 
624 

517 

97 
WORCESTER. 

641 

Pl.ATK    56 


487 


558 

488 
499a 

565 

607 

609 

672 

72 

FORCES  ri:R. 

568 

620 


Plate  57 


489  549 

WORCESTER. 


Plate  58 


545 

561 

566       554 

563 

125 

570 

608      569 

124 

555 

556 

629 

539 
WORCi'.STKR. 

630 

Plate  59 


c-*... '  -^ 


Plate  6o 


506 


511 


540 


543 


WORCESTER. 


Plate  6i 


719 
75 


618 


53  617 


534 
634 


118 
518 


52 

WORCI-.Sl'ER. 


89 


Plate  62 


578 


576 
673 


542 
544 

WORCESTER. 


577 

484 
674 


Plate  63 


503 

589 

595 

606 

613 

615 

663      483 

502 

482       661 

512 

594 

509 

WO  I 

ai'.sr 

■,R. 

Platk  64 


i-. 

^ t;j=:^*^-*- 

^^ 

658 

523 

658 

592 

485 

600 

593 

581 

603 

582a 

504 

\V{)RCi:STKR. 

585 

r  =L 


%l 


Plate  65 


,:V>»v>^I%,lJ,;^,^ 


"■iSacqiijIiu 


575 


583 


590 

537 

520 

WORCESTER. 


574 


584 


I''late  66 


573.     -Mrc,  dated   "  Aprd    ^tli,   177c 


587 

\V()UL■l•:s^I•l^ 


Plate  67 


599 


604 


Pl.ATK    68 


516a 

W()RCl':S'ri'.R    iClianiberlainV). 


117 
LONGTOX    II AI. 


Plate  6g 


679  677 

I.DXC'IOX    MALL. 


Plate  70 


680 

683 

678 

189 

682 

681 

169 

47 

332 

47 

LO.\(i 

I'I'OX  HAIL. 

Plate  71 


36 


LONG  TON    IIAIJ.. 


Plate  7; 


684.     An[i:k'IC.\. 


685.     Asia. 


I'l  VMDiril. 


Plate  73 


687 
PLYMOUTH. 


735 
BRISTOL. 


Plate  74 


757 


689 

703 

689 

697 

710 

698 

691 

696 
l'I.^-\l()C 

I'll. 

691 

712 

Pr.ATr  75 


690  693  690 

38  718  717  688 

707       688        707       688        707 
I'l.YMOLTM. 


Plate  76 


Plate  77 


733 


728 
731 

r.Ris'roL. 


733 


Plate  78 


i       b 


Plate  jg 


729.     \\'ixrKR  AND  Sprixg. 


730.     Spring  a.\i.  Winter. 
T'.RIS'|-OI,. 


Plate 


Plate  8i 


737 

711 

737 

760 

770 

761 

738     744 

739 

746 

738 

755 

734 
I'.KMsTOI,. 

753 

Platk  82 


740 

'.RisruL. 


Plate  83 


no 


r>RIST<)l,       Suit  paste  porcelain. 


Plate  8^ 


716 


'.RisTOL  OK  i'],v.\ior'rii. 


Plate  85 


Plate  86 


Plate  87 


n« 


fc-i3 


790 


784 


789 
.I\'KRI'(K)L. 


785 


Plate  88 


Plate  89 


129 


108 

797 


130 


123 


596 


123 


l.OWKS'I'OFT. 


Plate  go 


792 


Jug  of  Uncertain  Origin. 


798 


LOWKS  rOl'T. 


Plate  gi 


m  5         z 


Plate  92 


(M  O 

O         Li, 


Plate   03 


I   (2) 


s 


6  (20) 


-/- 


10  (65) 


./ 


15  (157) 


/.^ 


Cj 


v^ 


2  (3) 


4     10 


^ 


+- 


7  (96)  8  (104) 


9  (66) 


II      106)  12  (84)  13  (514) 

BOW. 


Nr^ 


17   '373 


4r 


lb   ilSOi 

18 

(349) 

;& 


31'   1 445  J 


(407) 


\I/ 


19  (340- 


T 


/ 

5  '18) 

Jo 


14  i515) 


27  (457) 


V  - 


I   1 


:8  (4241 


20  (246)  21   (219)         22  (196)  23  (193  2.|    401 

CIIICLSEA    AND   CIIKI.SKA  Dl.l'ir.V. 

1  he  numbers  in   brackuts  arc  those  of  the  nbiects  from  which   the  m.irkb  an-  taken. 


\ 


Plate   94 


29  (466) 


30  (465)  31   (476) 

DERBY. 


V-   (474) 


33  (683j 

I-ONGTON 

HALL. 


3+  (35) 


35  (35) 


3&  (53) 


37  (38) 


-^n      c        ^       t 


40  f644) 
38  (580)  39  (529)  41  (641) 


44    571J 


4^8 


4-  1635 


43  1668 


43    656 J 


46  (646) 


47  I517j 


48  (492)  49  (516a I 

WORCESTER. 


50  (675) 


The  numbers  in  brackets  arc  those  of  the  objects  from  which  the  marks  arc  taken. 


Plate  95 


51   l27i 


56  (738) 


'■n- 


52  (713) 


57  (753) 


"IE" 

'A 

54  (716: 

53  i707) 

PI.YMOITH. 

-L 

X 

(723) 


58  <754J 


59  (761) 


60  (762j 


yt- 


61   (764) 


qr 


69  (770) 


62  (765) 


X 
3. 


63  (769i 


;  I 


65  (773)  66  (774)  67  (771) 


X4 


64  (,772/ 


6S   ,768) 


70  (775)  71  (776)  72  (777)  7J  (779) 


I'.RISIOL. 
The  numbers  in  brackets  arc  those  of  the  <.l)jci  ts  from  which  the  marks  are  taken. 


Plate  96 


^5 


}|  -3    112      LOWESTOFT. 


74  (790)     CAIGHLEV 


Liavcnuor! 

LONOPOPT 


78   (791) 


1 


7<^    803 


77  (800. 


Sbode 


«o  (802) 


76  (792)     Ukcektain. 


^••oHImm  «  C: 


<Si     803a) 


STAFl'ORDSHIkE. 


(804)  83  (805) 

NAXTCiARW. 


84  ('808 


85  (809) 


SWANSEA. 


.  i 


V) 


r 


TM 


86  (795 J 


88   1,796) 


87  (794J 

SWINTOX     fRoCKINGHAM). 
I'lie  numlxTS  in  brackets  are  those  of  the  objects  frnm  wliiili   the  iiiaric-  an-  taken. 


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